Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery

Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery

Amazing Grace tells the story of the remarkable life of the British abolitionist William Wilberforce (1759–1833). This accessible biography chronicles Wilberforce's extraordinary role as a human rights activist, cultural reformer, and member of Parliament.At the center of this heroic life was a passionate twenty-year fight to abolish the British slave trade, a battle Wilbe...

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Title:Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery
Author:Eric Metaxas
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Edition Language:English

Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery Reviews

  • Mike (the Paladin)

    I went 4 stars on this book, and then went back and gave it 5. As far as "literary rating" or readability I'd say that I liked Mr. Metaxes' book on Bonhoeffer a little better. Again that's in readability. This book tends to have a lot of detail about the world and time of William Wilberforce that doesn't relate directly to the "main" topic ("The Heroic Campaign to End Slavery) but does relate to him, his life, and touches on the main topic peripherally. While it tends (at times) to slow the narr

    I went 4 stars on this book, and then went back and gave it 5. As far as "literary rating" or readability I'd say that I liked Mr. Metaxes' book on Bonhoeffer a little better. Again that's in readability. This book tends to have a lot of detail about the world and time of William Wilberforce that doesn't relate directly to the "main" topic ("The Heroic Campaign to End Slavery) but does relate to him, his life, and touches on the main topic peripherally. While it tends (at times) to slow the narrative a bit, it is valuable and widens the picture of Wilberforce and the world in which he lived.

    This is an exceptional book about an exceptional person. The observation is made in the text of the book that it's amazing how little is known about William Wilberforce today. His name should be as well known as any of the giants of history that school children can (or should be able to) name. It seems in many ways that he succeeded so well that the very ideas and REALITY he struggled against is one that "we" in the modern world have trouble realizing.

    Slavery, while still around in the shadows of our world today, practiced by evil people out of the light was until the middle of the 19th century not only nothing remarkable, but the accepted norm of the world. Regarded as necessary and normal, having been around THROUGHOUT RECORDED HISTORY slavery was "no big deal". However, the abolitionist movement was widely considered to be radical, dangerous, anti-government and anti-economy. It was also thought to be the purview of "religious fanatics". Wilberforce's struggle in England and final success gave strength and encouragement to the struggle here.

    I can not give you a generalized view of all that this book covers, the information it contains and the story it tells. Well that and a recommendation.

    I'D SAY, DON'T MISS IT.

    I'm a Christian (if you're not, please don't tune out, no sermon coming or anything) as such I'm aware that Jesus never intended the Christian Church to be a "civil governing body". We are not to establish a Christian Theocracy...we are to live as Christians letting that permeate our entire lives and be good citizens. Throughout history there have been times when Christians have had to confront evils so heinous that they could not turn away.

    Slavery was/is one of those.

    The story told in this is one of struggle against overwhelming odds and also one of great faith.

    I don't think I can recommend this book too highly. Yes, 5 stars.

  • Heather

    Wow, this book is truly amazing. And I almost had to skip over parts because of the descriptions of the horrible brutality that the slaves in the West Indies were subjected to. I'm just in awe of William Wilberforce and the men who fought so hard and so long (year after year in the British Parliament, through Napoleon's war, etc.) to get the abolition laws to pass. And once they finally had a victory, the years and decades spent to reinforce those laws and to create support for the displaced sla

    Wow, this book is truly amazing. And I almost had to skip over parts because of the descriptions of the horrible brutality that the slaves in the West Indies were subjected to. I'm just in awe of William Wilberforce and the men who fought so hard and so long (year after year in the British Parliament, through Napoleon's war, etc.) to get the abolition laws to pass. And once they finally had a victory, the years and decades spent to reinforce those laws and to create support for the displaced slaves who were finally freed. William Wilberforce is comparable to Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King in my opinion. Not only did Wilberforce fight against slavery his entire political career, decade after decade, he fought against an entire nation's moral degradation, and brought moral and religious enlightenment to a fallen and miserable world. Wilberforce's greatest challenge was not to abolish the slave trade, but to change the hearts, minds, and the conscience of the most greedy and corrupt beings possible to imagine.

  • Cynda Cat

    Excellent delightful narrator: Johnny Heller. Did the voices to extent that I recognized he was doing voices but not to extent of sounding cheesy.

    Eric MetMetaxas writes a psychological biology. He gives the reader an in-depth understanding of parents, family, foster parents, schoolmates, his particular life-long friend William Pitt, the Younger

    The book is heavily directed towards US Americans. In the parts where Metaxas describes young Wilberforce's worldview and where Metaxas describes the on-g

    Excellent delightful narrator: Johnny Heller. Did the voices to extent that I recognized he was doing voices but not to extent of sounding cheesy.

    Eric MetMetaxas writes a psychological biology. He gives the reader an in-depth understanding of parents, family, foster parents, schoolmates, his particular life-long friend William Pitt, the Younger

    The book is heavily directed towards US Americans. In the parts where Metaxas describes young Wilberforce's worldview and where Metaxas describes the on-going arguments of Parliament, slaveship owners, and other participants in Parliaments' decisions to eliminate the slave trade and later to emancipate slave. Metaxas explains 18th- and 19th-century English thought in 21st-century US ways. He repeatedly mentions US/America.

    Wilberforce acts as a Force for Loving Kindness, yes. But more than that, he has a solid grasp of theology of English--Anglicans and Methodists and a solid grasp on the Dignity of Mankind. ("Man/Mankind" would be Wilberforce's term, not mine.)

    As Wilberforce approaches adulthood, the Age of Democracy quickly arrives. He is born at the perfect time, has the perfect experiences, has the perfect connections, has the perfect political status to become a Great Agent for Good.

    Wilberforce started with/amassed a fortune that allowed him to be a prime organizer of Societies, Intisitutions, Associations, and other Organizations that furthered development of democracy.

    When receiving general educations, we are often led to appreciate of the Victorian Age with Victoria being assisted by her committed and somewhat empowered husband Prince Albert. Yet that understanding is plainly wrong.

    One afternoon, the Duchess of Kent asked for Wilberforce to call. He is 55 or 60 years old, playing on the floor with Young Victoria.

    Quote from book:

    Here on the miniature plain of the carpet in a prophetic tableau of domestic happiness is the child who would lend the future era her name met the man who give it its character.

    End of Quote

    Why do we not remember him? Why did the US not take example of some citizens of GB who wanted to strive to restore some of the dignity of Africa by supporting the return amd the empowerment of their human assets in Sierra Leone. Something similar and more successfully would be done in Haiti.

    Movie Comment. I first learned of Wilberforce by watching movie

    . The movie cannot do justice to world-history-changing events nor even to the people involved in the struggle. And nothing about civil rights activities taken by inner group of Wilberforce along with many others in India, Sierra Leone, Haiti or about how Napoleon upon leaving Elba capitulated and emancipated the slaves almost immediately as ploy to deflect English anger.

    I strongly suggest reading this book.

  • Jason Koivu

    is a biography written with WAAAY more cheek than I expected!

    The slight and frail English gentleman William Wilberforce...

    ...was the heroic and eloquent man at the head of the push to abolish the slave trade.

    Wilberforce is a name not well known in America as perhaps it may be in England. Right or wrong, we Americans think "Lincoln" when we think of the end of slavery. Of course, slavery continues to this day. Eric Metaxas'

    does an admirable job in reminding us who d

    is a biography written with WAAAY more cheek than I expected!

    The slight and frail English gentleman William Wilberforce...

    ...was the heroic and eloquent man at the head of the push to abolish the slave trade.

    Wilberforce is a name not well known in America as perhaps it may be in England. Right or wrong, we Americans think "Lincoln" when we think of the end of slavery. Of course, slavery continues to this day. Eric Metaxas'

    does an admirable job in reminding us who deserves the credit in passing the laws that put an end to the legalized trade in human lives.

    It is a noble subject, but Metaxas actually uses sarcasm and like humor nearly through out and, while funny at times, it's off-putting in a biography. Perhaps he felt the subject matter needed levity. Perhaps he looked to capture Wilberforce's own gay sense of humor. Whatever the reason, it didn't always set well with this reader.

    From the title it should be readily apparent that religion (in this case Methodism) will be given a feature role. While not a puritanical prude from start to finish, Wilberforce was heavily influenced by his faith and let it guide him in many of his life's choices. From the book's tone, I would guess Metaxas is, if not Methodist, at least a like-minded Christian. He writes with an obvious bias. It's almost completely transparent at times with very little reading between the lines necessary. That swamps integrity in my book. However, when it comes to non-fiction, for some reason biographers are often allowed a long leash when it comes to balanced, fair and honest journalism.

    At heart, I would call the above faults, but I managed to overlook them and if you too can stomach an agenda not your own, then

    will ring in your heart the chimes of glorious freedom! Or at least it will be a worthy read on a worthy man. Either way, it's worth your while.

  • Natalie Vellacott

    I'm not sure where this book came from, but it was worth reading. It is a comprehensive biography of the life and work of William Wilberforce. It was especially interesting to learn more about his personal life and character. There is a lot of historical detail which stems the flow in places, but will be of interest to some. Wilberforce's perseverance in the cause of abolition is impressive and exhausting! The biographer makes it clear that it is rooted in his Christian faith although there is l

    I'm not sure where this book came from, but it was worth reading. It is a comprehensive biography of the life and work of William Wilberforce. It was especially interesting to learn more about his personal life and character. There is a lot of historical detail which stems the flow in places, but will be of interest to some. Wilberforce's perseverance in the cause of abolition is impressive and exhausting! The biographer makes it clear that it is rooted in his Christian faith although there is less about this than I was expecting.

    Excellent as a biography, but I would have liked to read more about his faith.

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