Einstein: His Life and Universe

Einstein: His Life and Universe

Einstein was a rebel and nonconformist from boyhood days, and these character traits drove both his life and his science. In this narrative, Walter Isaacson explains how his mind worked and the mysteries of the universe that he discovered....

DownloadRead Online
Title:Einstein: His Life and Universe
Author:Walter Isaacson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Einstein: His Life and Universe Reviews

  • Laurel

    I decided to read this book primarily because of my fiance's interest in Einstein's life and theories. I thought it might help me to actually have a somewhat intelligent reply on the rare occasion he starts talking physics (don't tell him I said so, but he is much smarter than I am). :)

    I felt a bit daunted by the length of it at first (700 pages, or 22 hours on 18 CDs), but the book is engrossing from the start. The periodic and quite detailed descriptions of Einstein's theories and research wer

    I decided to read this book primarily because of my fiance's interest in Einstein's life and theories. I thought it might help me to actually have a somewhat intelligent reply on the rare occasion he starts talking physics (don't tell him I said so, but he is much smarter than I am). :)

    I felt a bit daunted by the length of it at first (700 pages, or 22 hours on 18 CDs), but the book is engrossing from the start. The periodic and quite detailed descriptions of Einstein's theories and research were a bit (okay, maybe way) over my head at times, but that didn't in any way damper my enjoyment of the book. When I did understand the physics, I found it all rather fascinating. I especially enjoyed learning the details of Einstein's life, relationships, struggles and philosophies. In fact, much to my surprise, there were times I had trouble putting this book down. Isaacson creates a vivid and engaging portrait of who Einstein was as a whole -- both the brilliant and the quirky -- and gives us a wonderful glimpse into how this man's amazing mind led to some of the most incredible scientific discoveries in history. Very well-written and meticulously researched.

  • Luís C.

    Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    Albert Einstein regarded as the scientific history of the twentieth century. Einstein proposed the famous equation

    . This equation proved to be revolutionary for future studies in nuclear physics, but in those days the means to prove experimentally were not available. Thus, the energy E m represents the mass, both interconnected by the speed of light c. This equation related to mass conversions of energy, therefore, it could

    Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity

    Albert Einstein regarded as the scientific history of the twentieth century. Einstein proposed the famous equation

    . This equation proved to be revolutionary for future studies in nuclear physics, but in those days the means to prove experimentally were not available. Thus, the energy E m represents the mass, both interconnected by the speed of light c. This equation related to mass conversions of energy, therefore, it could be assumed that the two entities were different manifestations of the same thing.

    Bohr atomic model

    The Danish physicist Niels Bohr developed a hypothesis in 1913 according to which electrons were distributed in distinct layers (or quantum levels) some distance from the nucleus. Thus, the electronic configuration of the various elements was constituted.

    For Bohr electrons spun in fixed orbits from which no radiation is emitted. Thus the old concept of the atom as indivisible, inert, and simply buried, and the hypothesis of a complex structure later would appear to be complicated to generate manifestations of energy.

    The Manhattan Project

    In 1939, at the beginning of World War II, Albert Einstein recommended that US President FD Roosevelt go ahead with the atomic bomb development project. Einstein explained that, thanks to the research conducted by Enrico Fermi and Leo Szilard in the United States, and Frédéric Joliot and his wife Irene Joliot-Curie in France, it was almost certainly faster to unleash a nuclear chain reaction that would unleash a large amount of energy. This will also allow the construction of a new class of pumps.

    Einstein also mentioned the scarcity of uranium reserves in the United States and that this mine-mineral was in former Czechoslovakia and the Belgian Congo. A collaboration between scientists and industry was proposed to develop the atomic bomb mentioned above as soon as possible.

    He reported that Germany had suspended the sale of uranium from the Czech mines, which the Reich had resumed. This could mean that scientists at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute would approach experiments in the field of nuclear fission, too.

    Albert Einstein's fear of nuclear war was the result of his in-depth knowledge of the progress of research in this field. He had to emigrate to the United States in 1933 from Germany at the beginning of the persecution of the Jews.

    read:

  • brian

    here's a letter a young einstein wrote to his pal.

    the 1st paragraph: more waugh than egghead, eh?

    and that 2nd paragraph?

    those 'papers'?

    ?

    holy shit.

    here's a letter a young einstein wrote to his pal.

    the 1st paragraph: more waugh than egghead, eh?

    and that 2nd paragraph?

    those 'papers'?

    ?

    holy shit.

    and later in life he wrote this gorgeousness:

    just for fun, let's compare/contrast with:

    - Cardinal William Henry O'Connell

    and later, witnessing the rise of hitler, albert shot off this email to FDR:

    the last one, not really.

    but it's a close approximation.

  • Diane

    One of my favorite picture books that I saved from childhood is called

    by Ibi Lepscky. It's the story of Albert as a child, showing him as quiet and absentminded, and preferring to play the violin rather than roughhouse with other boys in the neighborhood. It also tells the story of when Albert had a fever and had to stay in bed, his father gave him a compass. Albert became fascinated by the needle and asked so many thoughtful questions about the magnetic fields and the poles of

    One of my favorite picture books that I saved from childhood is called

    by Ibi Lepscky. It's the story of Albert as a child, showing him as quiet and absentminded, and preferring to play the violin rather than roughhouse with other boys in the neighborhood. It also tells the story of when Albert had a fever and had to stay in bed, his father gave him a compass. Albert became fascinated by the needle and asked so many thoughtful questions about the magnetic fields and the poles of the earth that his father, who could not answer them all, realized how smart his son was.

    "Albert was indeed a child different from all others. His gaze, which everyone thought to be absentminded, really reflected a very busy mind, a mind that was exploring places where nobody else could follow. It was the mind of a genius."

    My mother, who was a mathematics professor and who was quite smart herself, gave me this book and frequently read it with me. It inspired in me a deep awe for Albert Einstein, one that has carried through to adulthood.

    Walter Isaacson seems to have the same reverence for Einstein — there is an underlying fondness and admiration in this biography. "His tale encompasses the vast sweep of modern science, from the infinitesimal to the infinite, from the emission of photons to the expansion of the cosmos. A century after his great triumphs, we are still living in Einstein's universe ... His fingerprints are all over today's technologies. Photoelectric cells and lasers, nuclear power and fiber optics, space travel, and even semiconductors all trace back to his theories. He signed the letter to Franklin Roosevelt warning that it may be possible to build an atom bomb, and the letters of his famed equation relating energy to mass hover in our minds when we picture the resulting mushroom cloud."

    At more than 600 pages, the book covers Einstein's entire life, with an emphasis on his "miracle year" of 1905, and his activities during both world wars. There isn't a lot about his childhood in Germany, but I was happy to see there was some truth in the story of his father bringing him a compass when he was sick in bed.

    Now before I wax too rhapsodic about this book, I need to warn my fellow readers that there is some serious physics-speak in here. I was listening to this on audio (read by the wonderful actor Edward Herrmann) and the chapters that discussed Einstein's scientific theories were difficult to follow. Fortunately, those confusing sections did not overwhelm the book, and there were plenty of interesting biographical details to share. Here are some of my favorites:

    There are so many more interesting stories and details in this book, and I went through dozens of Post-Its to mark passages. This is the second book by Walter Isaacson I've read, the other being

    , and he is a talented writer and biographer. I especially appreciate his skill at weaving quotes and anecdotes into the narrative. For example, this is a typically elegant and amusing paragraph from Isaacson:

    Even though I listened to an audiobook, I was happy I had requested a print copy from the library to peruse, because the book is filled with charming photographs of Einstein. His eyes could positively twinkle, and that shock of hair was rarely tamed. I really enjoyed most of this book, and if I had been more studious and applied myself, I probably could have made better sense of the heavy chapters on physics. But there is a reason I ended up in the humanities and not the sciences, and I shall continue to admire Mr. Einstein's work from a distance.

    "When I am judging a theory, I ask myself whether, if I were God, I would have arranged the world in such a way."

    "I have no special talents, I am only passionately curious."

  • Ahmad Sharabiani

    Einstein : his life and universe, Walter Isaacson

    How did Einstein's mind work? What made him a genius? Isaacson's biography shows how his scientific imagination sprang from the rebellious nature of his personality. ...

    تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز نهم ماه ژوئن سال 2011 میلادی

    عنوان: زندگی و جهان اینشتین؛ نویسنده: والتر ایساکسن؛ برگردان: علی بهفروز؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، دانشگاه تهران، 1389، در 700 ص، فروست: انتشارات دانشگاه تهران، شماره 3084، شابک: 9789640360514، موضوع: اینشتین، آلبرت، 1879 تا 1955 م.؛ فی

    Einstein : his life and universe, Walter Isaacson

    How did Einstein's mind work? What made him a genius? Isaacson's biography shows how his scientific imagination sprang from the rebellious nature of his personality. ...

    تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز نهم ماه ژوئن سال 2011 میلادی

    عنوان: زندگی و جهان اینشتین؛ نویسنده: والتر ایساکسن؛ برگردان: علی بهفروز؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، دانشگاه تهران، 1389، در 700 ص، فروست: انتشارات دانشگاه تهران، شماره 3084، شابک: 9789640360514، موضوع: اینشتین، آلبرت، 1879 تا 1955 م.؛ فیزیکدانان، سرگذشتنامه، نسبیت، نظریه میدان واحد - سده 20 م

    نظریه‌ پرداز بزرگ نسبیت بودند و تئوری

    E = mc2

    را ارائه دادند که پیامد آن دانشمندان فیزیک، به انرژی هسته ای دست یافتند. ا. شربیانی

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.