Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self

Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self

Dare to begin the journey. Within these pages lie powerful truths that can change your life...and inspire you to settle for nothing less than Something More.You may have a beautiful home, a family you adore, and work that you enjoy. But why do you secretly sense that you need something more to be truly happy? Because it's true. The wisdom, warmth, compassion, and disarming...

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Title:Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self
Author:Sarah Ban Breathnach
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Something More: Excavating Your Authentic Self Reviews

  • Diana Lowrie

    This book is a source to finding that voice of an authentic self. Written especially for women by a woman herself I think it depicts a lot of challenges we face going throughout life. Especially facing the challenge of finding our own identity not just an extention of an entity (be it family, wife, mother..). This book is a challenge and stirs up a lot of questions within a woman's soul that is both perplexing at time and full of joyful moments of ah ha's and wow I knew that but now I get it mom

    This book is a source to finding that voice of an authentic self. Written especially for women by a woman herself I think it depicts a lot of challenges we face going throughout life. Especially facing the challenge of finding our own identity not just an extention of an entity (be it family, wife, mother..). This book is a challenge and stirs up a lot of questions within a woman's soul that is both perplexing at time and full of joyful moments of ah ha's and wow I knew that but now I get it moments. A read for someone who might feel a bit lost or craving "Something More" in their life.

    Out of a job and car and between semesters at school I was faced with some depression and feeling sorry for myself. I'm still and undecided major and feel I should know more about what I want to do with my life so I turned to this book which I happened to have obtained early in 2006. This book seemed to be calling my name at just the right time. (I really think that is the key to enjoying a good book, I think they find you at the right time.)

  • Ileana

    A few quotes:

    "There is no agony like bearing an untold story inside you." Zora Neale Hurston

    "It is not easy to find happiness in ourselves, but it is not possible to find it elsewhere". Agnes Repplier

  • Jana

    I found this book while I was in the middle (or end) of a very bad relationship with someone I worshiped. That was the problem, I wasn't worshiping or even respecting myself.

    This book opened my eyes and heart and helped me work not only out of and through that poisonous situation but also helped me to understand the meaning of the words loving yourself, respecting yourself, honoring yourself and boundaries: How to have them and stand by them.

    My favorite part of the book: "Bad men come into our

    I found this book while I was in the middle (or end) of a very bad relationship with someone I worshiped. That was the problem, I wasn't worshiping or even respecting myself.

    This book opened my eyes and heart and helped me work not only out of and through that poisonous situation but also helped me to understand the meaning of the words loving yourself, respecting yourself, honoring yourself and boundaries: How to have them and stand by them.

    My favorite part of the book: "Bad men come into our lives to torture us into loving ourselves" paraphrased.

    Boy did she ever hit the nail on the head there.

    I came out of the end of this book a better, stronger, changed woman. It really helped me to grow. It was the right book at the right moment.

  • Ayana Mishelle

    This is a great book for critical thinking. Great for teachers. I own a very worn copy it is a book you can read again and again I have two books by breathnach and I will own everything she writes . she also wrote simple abundance which is a daily reader that i read just about everyday. this book was written for women but men can read it too !! We won't mind !!1

  • Maryellen

    I never did get into Sarah Ban Breathnach's popular "Simple Abundance," although I am re-reading it now, but this book was my daily rocket launcher into a vital and authentic life. It is unashamedly for women only.

    Her writing style is quite full of feelings and she does get a bit carried away with enthusiasm at times, but that may be a good thing. The book started me on excavating my authentic self, and I'm 62 years old and thought I knew myself pretty well. With prompting from this book I got t

    I never did get into Sarah Ban Breathnach's popular "Simple Abundance," although I am re-reading it now, but this book was my daily rocket launcher into a vital and authentic life. It is unashamedly for women only.

    Her writing style is quite full of feelings and she does get a bit carried away with enthusiasm at times, but that may be a good thing. The book started me on excavating my authentic self, and I'm 62 years old and thought I knew myself pretty well. With prompting from this book I got to work on scrapbooking my life, art journaling it, collaging it, writing a large chunk of memoir, and really shining a light on places within that were trying to hide out or stay below the surface.

    I am normally not too tolerant of anecdotes of "real people" as examples of concepts being discussed, but there is just enough of interesting and inspiring stories to keep it real.

    She has lots ofgreat exercises to do to dig down and get the True you. One of them, "field work," involved categories to help you get at your authentic self by collecting images that to you meant: authentic success, authentic style, return to self, relationships, spiritual journey, someday, The House of Belonging (your authentic home, cooking, decorating, etc.), entertainment and "mystery" images that reached out and grabbed you but you're not sure at this time why exactly. I love to art journal and I got curious to find out which categories were most represented in my art journals. I found an absolute majority were representative of return to self followed by authentic success and spiritual journey. It was enlightening.

    This is a book you must make your own by writing in it, highlighting it, writing in the margins and talking back to the author.

    I was sad to have it end, which is why I am again picking up "Simple Abundance."

  • TW Yeung

    the book starts out as Sarah's routine run-of-the-mill details about Victorian living and stories of different women that have inspired her, but ends with one of the most brilliant anecdotal evidence through her experiences to inspire women of what "our" life is meant to live as and for. her words strike the innermost chord and the effect is both earth-shattering and enlightening.

    i can't thank Sarah enough for her candidness and her bold authenticity, which continue to inspire myself to live an

    the book starts out as Sarah's routine run-of-the-mill details about Victorian living and stories of different women that have inspired her, but ends with one of the most brilliant anecdotal evidence through her experiences to inspire women of what "our" life is meant to live as and for. her words strike the innermost chord and the effect is both earth-shattering and enlightening.

    i can't thank Sarah enough for her candidness and her bold authenticity, which continue to inspire myself to live an authentic and true loving happy life possible.

  • Amy Leigh

    on the surface, this is the sort of cheesy book that i buy in secret and read behind everyone's back. there are flowers on the cover. its subtitle is 'excavating your authentic self.' the only way it could be more embarrassing is if it came with a tea cozy and a purple t-shirt all packaged up in a floral gift box.

    however. it's written by a smart, sensitive, and inspiring woman who's dealt with death and divorce and depression. it's about the ways women tend to give ourselves away to the other pe

    on the surface, this is the sort of cheesy book that i buy in secret and read behind everyone's back. there are flowers on the cover. its subtitle is 'excavating your authentic self.' the only way it could be more embarrassing is if it came with a tea cozy and a purple t-shirt all packaged up in a floral gift box.

    however. it's written by a smart, sensitive, and inspiring woman who's dealt with death and divorce and depression. it's about the ways women tend to give ourselves away to the other people in our lives, especially those we are in relationship with. and it's about how to find yourself again after shit blows up in your face and tears you to pieces.

    also, it recommends making collages. which is super cheesy and really really fun. i have made three so far, and they are great.

  • Helynne

    There are two subspecies of humans, Breathnach notes at the beginning of her 1998

    --the resigned, who live in quiet desperation, and the exhausted, who live in restless agitation. Her goal in this book, a followup to her popular

    , is to lead readers beyond these discomforting categories by helping each of us to discover the person we were really meant to be and thereby, to find our maximum level of satisfaction and joy. She does this v

    There are two subspecies of humans, Breathnach notes at the beginning of her 1998

    --the resigned, who live in quiet desperation, and the exhausted, who live in restless agitation. Her goal in this book, a followup to her popular

    , is to lead readers beyond these discomforting categories by helping each of us to discover the person we were really meant to be and thereby, to find our maximum level of satisfaction and joy. She does this very well, and with some really interesting instructions. "I've told you before that authenticity pushes us past our comfort zone--it's meant to"(13), Breathnach tells us in her first chapter entitled "Our Authentic Lives." "Blessings on your courage. You buried treasure lies within" (15). Like

    ,

    is a series of small essays, but this time they are divided into nine chapters rather than set up in a calendar format. Early in the book, Breathnach again advocates the pet project she urged in the earlier book--the illustrated discovery journal. She instructs readers to clip magazines and catalogues for various pictures and sayings that appeal to each of us, then to make them into collages that represent various categories of our lives--Authentic Success, Relationships, Spiritual Journey, Someday, etc., "This is a meditative insight tool . . these are the illustrated versions of the book your soul is writing for and about you" (26). "There are only three ways to change the trajectory of our lives," she continues--"crisis, chance and choice" (40). Her subsequent essay on choices and the courage to make them without fear or regrets is an interesting one. Breathnach shares the story of a severe head injury she suffered years earlier, and how she recovered from the resulting brain damage by creating an alter ego --"my Authentic Self"--that pulled her out of the fog and led her on a more honest path than she had been on before. Her ensuing essays, whether inspiring, thought-provoking or funky, and all enriched with quotations from numerous other writers and philosophers from Emily Bronte to Anais Nin to Mick Jagger and many more, focus on this same dedication to mining a more honest and actualized self. Breathnach concludes, "For the sake of all that his holy, believe that you deserve nothing less than Something More" (325).

  • Kerry & naomi

    A few years ago, I was wallowing: wallowing in self-pity; stressed and burned out at my job and debating ending my current career and starting over; frustrated with the singles scene when I was a part of it, frustrated with the lack of men to date when I kept myself out of it.

    I had regularly scheduled crying jags. When I voiced my dissatisfaction with being alone to my friends, they wished I could be happy on my own. When I voiced the idea that I wasn’t planning to marry and would spend my life

    A few years ago, I was wallowing: wallowing in self-pity; stressed and burned out at my job and debating ending my current career and starting over; frustrated with the singles scene when I was a part of it, frustrated with the lack of men to date when I kept myself out of it.

    I had regularly scheduled crying jags. When I voiced my dissatisfaction with being alone to my friends, they wished I could be happy on my own. When I voiced the idea that I wasn’t planning to marry and would spend my life alone, they told me I would find someone. (This is called the Great Singles Paradox: if you are unhappy being alone, everyone thinks you should learn to be happy anyway; if you decide to be alone and are happy about it, everyone thinks you should find someone.)

    I was in that place where the question at the forefront of my mind was, “Is this all there is?” The mantra I kept hearing, whispered in my thoughts, was, “There has to be something more.”

    And there is: a book by Sarah Ban Breathnach entitled

    . I zoomed (or rather with my slow internet connection, limped) to Amazon.com and placed my order.

    Did I expect this book to hold all the answers to my angst and confusion and despair? No. If that is what you, dear reader, would expect from this book, you’ll be disappointed, but a book can teach you how to look for those answers within oneself.

    has the potential to be such a book.

    Sarah Ban Breathnach uses archaeology as the framework for

    . The idea is to excavate one’s Authentic Self. The Authentic Self is the real person inside each of us who doesn’t care what “they” think, who does exactly what she wants to do, who gets what she wants because she knows intuitively that she deserves it.

    Ban Breathnach’s method to excavating one’s Authentic Self calls for introspection and an exploration of one’s past. She gives “assignments” in the form of “field work” and “site reports” at the end of major sections. The field work consists of things like going through old photographs (if available), creating an illustrated “discovery” journal, and playing the games we played as children. The site reports ask questions for the reader to explore in journal entries; questions like, “Were there events in your childhood that seemed very mysterious when they occurred?” and “How do you define comfort?”

    The first and main assignment of

    is to cull old magazines and photographs for images that appeal to the reader, cut those images out and put them in one of nine different manila envelopes labeled: Authentic Success, Authentic Style, Return to Self, Relationships, Spiritual Journey, Someday, The House of Belonging, Entertainment, Mystery. Once the reader has accumulated a goodly amount of clippings and paraphernalia, her goal, with the field work at the end of each section, is to make a collage in her discovery journal with the items in the enveloped corresponding to the section she just finished reading.

    I’m not an arts-and-crafts type of person. I didn’t own a glue stick until this item started appearing on school supply lists; I (still) can’t draw a decent picture of anything to save my life. Upon first reading, I was in a very demanding and stressful job (you know, the one that will make or break your entire career) that required a good chunk of my free time for social commitments, while I led my own hectic social life. The very idea of taking on one more thing, of feeling I “had to” pushed me to my limit. I made a conscious decision to not make an illustrated discovery journal. (I also loathe scrapbooking and refuse to do “vision” boards.)

    Ban Breathnach states, up front, that “you cannot do the illustrated discovery journal incorrectly.” I wasn’t worried about doing it incorrectly; its goal is a journey to the soul and there is no right or wrong in that regard. I was worried about feeling compelled to do it, just as I had turned reading the daily devotion from the

    forerunner,

    , into a chore that must be gotten through each day and crossed neatly off my list of things to do. I didn’t do the discovery journal. Ban Breathnach states that the reader should read the entire book through, then go back and create the discovery journal as she rereads each chapter. I didn’t do that either. In following my own will in this instance, I discovered a part of “Something More” which means doing something less.

    Ban Breathnach writes beautiful, thoughtful sentences that flow well throughout the book. She tells of personal experiences in her own life and stories from the lives of others to illustrate the points she’s trying to make in each chapter. She also uses an abundance of quotations, some well known, others obscure, that are particularly apt and well-chosen.

    Ban Breathnach writes short chapters that often reminded me of the daily devotion sections of

    . The short chapters, many no more than a page, also make it easy for the reader to put down the book and think about that chapter before moving on to the next.

  • Diana Bogan

    I never read "Simple Abundance" which preceded this book, so I have nothing to compare "Something More" against. I picked up this book at a swap several years ago, not even sure why I was drawn to it. Over the past month, I finally took the time to slowly read through it nightly before bed. This book deeply resonated with me. Sometimes a simple quote is all it took to unhinge my soul and bring to the surface issues that my mind seemed to wrestle with in my sleep. Sometimes it was the examples an

    I never read "Simple Abundance" which preceded this book, so I have nothing to compare "Something More" against. I picked up this book at a swap several years ago, not even sure why I was drawn to it. Over the past month, I finally took the time to slowly read through it nightly before bed. This book deeply resonated with me. Sometimes a simple quote is all it took to unhinge my soul and bring to the surface issues that my mind seemed to wrestle with in my sleep. Sometimes it was the examples and stories she shared that moved me to thought and emotion. I love this book, because I came to it at the right time. With these types of books I believe you have to read them when you're ready or have reason to need the messages they contain. I'm not sure that had I read it when I found it, that it would have held as much meaning for me. This happened to be my time for something more.

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