The Army of Dr. Moreau

The Army of Dr. Moreau

Following the trail of several corpses seemingly killed by wild animals, Holmes and Watson stumble upon the experiments of Doctor Moreau.Moreau, through vivisection and crude genetic engineering is creating animal hybrids, determined to prove the evolutionary theories of Charles Darwin. In his laboratory, hidden among the opium dens of Rotherhithe, Moreau is building an...

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Title:The Army of Dr. Moreau
Author:Guy Adams
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Army of Dr. Moreau Reviews

  • Riju Ganguly

    Alan Moore had begun his "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" series using some of the greatest works of Victorian fiction as the source of the protagonists & antagonists, but then had allowed things to drift into a surreal fugue state that is typical of his mind (genius, but not exactly.....). Guy Adams didn't attempt something THAT ambitious, but his pastiche is actually a highly enjoyable work that reminds one of the first couple of volumes of 'TLOEG'. The title says a lot, but the

    Alan Moore had begun his "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" series using some of the greatest works of Victorian fiction as the source of the protagonists & antagonists, but then had allowed things to drift into a surreal fugue state that is typical of his mind (genius, but not exactly.....). Guy Adams didn't attempt something THAT ambitious, but his pastiche is actually a highly enjoyable work that reminds one of the first couple of volumes of 'TLOEG'. The title says a lot, but the dialogues, the action-packed narrative, and the superlative mixing of comic & grotesque across the pages, make this book a very special piece. Highly Recommended.

  • OpenBookSociety.com

    Review brought to you by OBS reviewer Angie

    I have not read any of the original Sherlock Holmes books, and was really excited to read something that was an ‘homage’ to this classic series. I was not disappointed in the least.

    I have to admit that having seen the recent Sherlock Holmes movies with Robert Downey Jr., I did imagine him in this role as I was reading. It made it quite exciting and really helped to bring it to life in my imagination.

    What I enjoyed about this story was the crossover in

    Review brought to you by OBS reviewer Angie

    I have not read any of the original Sherlock Holmes books, and was really excited to read something that was an ‘homage’ to this classic series. I was not disappointed in the least.

    I have to admit that having seen the recent Sherlock Holmes movies with Robert Downey Jr., I did imagine him in this role as I was reading. It made it quite exciting and really helped to bring it to life in my imagination.

    What I enjoyed about this story was the crossover in another well-known story, The Island of Dr. Moreau by HG Wells. It was fascinating to see how the author was able to intertwine the stories in such a way that they felt natural. The interaction between the characters was seamless and felt truly accurate to both original works and the period of the story.

    I don’t often read books a second time, but this one will definitely make it on that short list!

  • Margaret

    I bought this book on spec with a voucher I got for Christmas. I am so glad I did. This has to be one of my favourite Sherlock Holmes books outside of the canon.

    The word "romp" is often over used in book descriptions, but it certainly describes "The Army of Dr. Moreau". A wild, riotous romp through Victorian London, the chase led by Sherlock Holmes and a posse of characters from other novels.

    The premise of the book is that Dr Moreau was working for Mycroft's mysterious Department before and

    I bought this book on spec with a voucher I got for Christmas. I am so glad I did. This has to be one of my favourite Sherlock Holmes books outside of the canon.

    The word "romp" is often over used in book descriptions, but it certainly describes "The Army of Dr. Moreau". A wild, riotous romp through Victorian London, the chase led by Sherlock Holmes and a posse of characters from other novels.

    The premise of the book is that Dr Moreau was working for Mycroft's mysterious Department before and during the incidents of Wells' book "The Island of Dr. Moreau". Moreau appears to be dead, but his creations are creating havoc in London. Who is behind it, and what is their motive? Mycroft enlists his little brother Sherlock and his friend, John Watson, along with Professor Challenger, Cavor, and one or two others, to get to the root of the problem.

    The interactions between the Holmes' brothers and Watson are gorgeous. Guy Adams was writing this novel around the same time he was writing the BBC Sherlock tie-in book, and there is a little bleed through in repartee, not to mention one genuine steal from his Sherlock book, which had me laughing.

    One interesting character is Kane, a human/hound hybrid. John Watson's method of disposing of this creature after being hunted by it is both humourous and somewhat poignant.

    I heartily recommend this book to all Sherlockians, and I would also recommend it to any Sherlock fans who find the jump from Sherlock to Arthur Conan Doyle canon a little abrupt. This book is perfect to ease your way properly into the genre.

  • Milo (BOK)

    “A great read. Most Sherlock Holmes fans will find something that they like in Adams’ latest tale of the World’s Greatest Detective .” ~The Founding Fields

    I’m going to admit that I wasn’t really introduced to Sherlock Holmes as a character until Steven Moffat’s brilliant modern-day adaption of the series in BBC’s Sherlock. I’d heard about him before, I mean – who hadn’t? It was Sherlock that got me hooked to Conan-Doyle’s creation, and it was Sherlock that got me reading the individual stories,

    “A great read. Most Sherlock Holmes fans will find something that they like in Adams’ latest tale of the World’s Greatest Detective .” ~The Founding Fields

    I’m going to admit that I wasn’t really introduced to Sherlock Holmes as a character until Steven Moffat’s brilliant modern-day adaption of the series in BBC’s Sherlock. I’d heard about him before, I mean – who hadn’t? It was Sherlock that got me hooked to Conan-Doyle’s creation, and it was Sherlock that got me reading the individual stories, which anybody should read (They’re free downloads on IBooks). When I heard about The Army of Dr. Moreau, Guy Adams’ second novel with Sherlock Holmes, I knew I had to read it as soon as I could. Some of you may know Guy Adams through his work at Angry Robot, with The World House and Restoration (That was where I first heard about Adams, even though I haven’t read the books yet), others may be wanting to read some more Sherlock Holmes. Whatever your taste is, The Army of Dr. Moreau is certainly an enjoyable read.

    Dead bodies are found on the streets of London with wounds that can only be explained as the work of ferocious creatures not native to the city.

    Sherlock Holmes is visited by his brother, Mycroft, who is only too aware that the bodies are the calling card of Dr Moreau, a vivisectionist who was working for the British Government, following in the footsteps of Charles Darwin, before his experiments attracted negative attention and the work was halted. Mycroft believes that Moreau’s experiments continue and he charges his brother with tracking the rogue scientist down before matters escalate any further.

    Although The Army of Dr. Moreau may seem at times a tad too supernatural for Conan-Doyle fans, that doesn’t make it any less enjoyable. It is perhaps one of the more enjoyable reads that I’ve read in while now, standing up there with Jim Butcher’s White Night, because – any Dresden Files novel is a fun read, long-running fans of the series will know that by now. The Army of Dr. Moreau sticks to Conan-Doyle’s characters very well, painting an accurate portrayal of Holmes and of course, is narrated in a first person POV by John Watson. What I liked about this tale is that Adams has managed to make Watson unavailable for some scenes that take place, forcing other characters to have a couple of chapters every now and again where they get the chance to tell the story. We get a POV from both Holmes brothers, (yes – Mycroft does show up in this tale) – and a couple of others.

    Released last month, The Army of Dr. Moreau is certainly an engaging read, and Adams, like Conan-Doyle before him, made it seem as though it’s Watson narrating the tale, and not the author in certain places, and there’s even a visit to Watson’s editor, who suggests to him that he should perhaps make his cases more extravagant and longer for readers rather than the short stories that he’s used to, in a brilliant bit of foreshadowing.

    See the full review at The Founding Fields:

    .

  • Milou

    This is one of the better Sherlock Holmes adaptations I have come across so far, while also perfectly capturing the haunting and distributing atmosphere of The Island of Doctor Moreau. Guy Adams portrayed Sherlock very well as the genius, charismatic, cocky, somewhat heartless man he was in Conan Doyle's stories, without making him an asshole. His interactions with his brother and Watson are spot on.

    This story is filled with amazing humour that made me chuckle more than ones. This mainly comes

    This is one of the better Sherlock Holmes adaptations I have come across so far, while also perfectly capturing the haunting and distributing atmosphere of The Island of Doctor Moreau. Guy Adams portrayed Sherlock very well as the genius, charismatic, cocky, somewhat heartless man he was in Conan Doyle's stories, without making him an asshole. His interactions with his brother and Watson are spot on.

    This story is filled with amazing humour that made me chuckle more than ones. This mainly comes from the side characters, but also the jests between the Holmes brothers and Watson.

    This story features not only our familiar Sherlock, Watson and Mycroft, but also a grown up Wiggins. It was a delight to see him back again. Of course we also see several characters of The Island of Doctor Moreau pass by, if only by name. Next to that we have a team of well-known scientists, such as Professor Challenger (The Lost World), Professor Lindenbrook (A Journey to the Centre of the Earth) and Abner Perry (At the Earth's Core). And then there is Inspector George Mann (author of The Will of the Death [4*], The Infinity Bridge [4*] The Osiris Ritual [5*])

    However, I do have some criticisms which makes this book loose a star. First of all, the mystery isn't very mysterious and things are solved a bit too easy. Secondly, Sherlock and Watson have an argument in the beginning of the book about Sherlock showing-off, after which Sherlock decides not to explain anything anymore and let Watson figure things out on his own. As fitting as this childishness is to the characters, it kinda feels as a way for the author to get out of having to write brilliant deductions. It makes Sherlock more all-knowing instead of a genius... the deductions are what makes Sherlock Sherlock. It also works with the concept of evolution, but it is handled wrong. That is not how evolution works!

    Overall a very fun, quick and atmospheric read which I highly recommend for both Holmes and Dr Moreau fans.

  • Cory

    I skipped to the back of this book and read the notes section first. In it, the author said that he could raise much the same points that H.G. Wells raised in the original

    regarding man's inhumane treatment of animals in scientific experiments. I remember immediately thinking, "Man's inhumane...? Man's inhumane treatment of animals???

    what you got out of

    ? Inhumane treatment of

    ??????"

    I immediately concluded the author was not a very

    I skipped to the back of this book and read the notes section first. In it, the author said that he could raise much the same points that H.G. Wells raised in the original

    regarding man's inhumane treatment of animals in scientific experiments. I remember immediately thinking, "Man's inhumane...? Man's inhumane treatment of animals???

    what you got out of

    ? Inhumane treatment of

    ??????"

    I immediately concluded the author was not a very deep person.

    Sadly, as I finished the book, I found that this was a correct assessment. This is the book equivalent of a summer blockbuster. Arnold Schwarzenegger could have played Sherlock Holmes in this and it wouldn't have looked out of place.

    This book doesn't fit in the Sherlockian canon. Holmes's ability to cold-read someone and tell their life story or make amazing deductions with a little logical extrapolation of available information takes a back seat to the white-knuckle action that would be more at home in the pen of Sylvester Stallone than Arthur Conan Doyle. This fits squarely in the Robert Downey, Jr. re-imagining.

    Coupled with the lack of depth in understanding his source material, Guy Adams makes the villain a complete psychopath rather than use some imagination and come up with a motive for why he was an ecoterrorist with an ironic method. So we don't get to see a misanthrope who's convinced himself he's right; rather, we get someone who has no firm grip on reality anyway who somehow escaped a proper diagnosis. That was disappointing.

    At least Holmes himself, in bit of metahumor, points out that this case wasn't a mental challenge as is typical of his cases. Boy, you said a mouthful.

    Also, far from a benevolent figure, Mycroft Holmes is portrayed similarly to the Cigarette Smoking Man from

    . He clearly has his own agenda and tries to hide government secrets from everyone involved. It's been a while since I've read a Holmes story with Mycroft in it, but I don't remember the detective's brother being a minor villain.

    All-in-all, great fun. But it lacks the cool deductive skill that the Sherlock Holmes stories are known for, and all the philosophical depth is stripped from

    . It was good, but it could have been better.

  • Andrea Elkins

    Putting aside the ridiculous lack of scientific reality, I enjoyed this one a bit more than the previous one I read by Adams. The only jarring bit to me was the introduction/inclusion of the various "scientists" that were to serve as a consulting role to Holmes. Only one actually accompanied them on an adventure, and he contributed nothing but hot air. In the author's note at the end, Adams says that he included them as nods to various authors like Jules Verne, but I found the device simply

    Putting aside the ridiculous lack of scientific reality, I enjoyed this one a bit more than the previous one I read by Adams. The only jarring bit to me was the introduction/inclusion of the various "scientists" that were to serve as a consulting role to Holmes. Only one actually accompanied them on an adventure, and he contributed nothing but hot air. In the author's note at the end, Adams says that he included them as nods to various authors like Jules Verne, but I found the device simply distracting.

  • Jay Sprenkle

    Pros:

    It did have some wonderful lines: "Only went and got myself bitten by a sharktopuss, didn't I? I mean seriously, the bloody thing went for me like a cross between a Chinese dinner and my mother-in-law."

    The author didn't hide facts. A mystery where you don't get all the clues and the perpetrator is someone created out of whole cloth at the end is very unsatisfying.

    Cons:

    The mystery was not very interesting.

    I didn't care much for any of the characters. They were all childish and shallow.

    The

    Pros:

    It did have some wonderful lines: "Only went and got myself bitten by a sharktopuss, didn't I? I mean seriously, the bloody thing went for me like a cross between a Chinese dinner and my mother-in-law."

    The author didn't hide facts. A mystery where you don't get all the clues and the perpetrator is someone created out of whole cloth at the end is very unsatisfying.

    Cons:

    The mystery was not very interesting.

    I didn't care much for any of the characters. They were all childish and shallow.

    The author changed the perspective several times during the story without warning.

    The end felt very rushed and poorly done compared to the rest of the book. The last fight with the big bad guy was particularly horrid. I think it was supposed to be funny but it really fell flat for me.

  • Amber

    This review is listed under

    For more information on this project, click

    Not a good book to end

    on. You just can't win them all.

    I half-expected this book to disappoint me. Over the course of this endeavor, I've come across books that really just flew off the edge of common sense and face planted in the world of the ridiculous. I've come across some select books that were absolute gems, but the key word

    This review is listed under

    For more information on this project, click

    Not a good book to end

    on. You just can't win them all.

    I half-expected this book to disappoint me. Over the course of this endeavor, I've come across books that really just flew off the edge of common sense and face planted in the world of the ridiculous. I've come across some select books that were absolute gems, but the key word here is "select".

    The worst part is is that it starts off fantastically as bodies wash up in random places and Holmes is called to investigate. How Watson was roped into a false sense of security only to be stabbed in the back and taken away by the villain was a nice touch. Kane was kind of funny, once I saw who he really was. It was nice to see Professor Challenger in there, as a nod to another ACD work.

    But Holmes said something to the effect that Moreau's army was just the remains of his experimentation being exploited by a mastermind and he was right. When half-human half-animal hybrids came into the mix, I knew we were headed for the ridiculous and I dreaded it. Why do you think it took me so long to finish it?

    The climax did not feel very tense, I didn't feel worried about any main characters being hurt (as we only knew very little about them, they weren't needed all that much), and I

    wanted to see some more closure in dealing with Moreau's successor. So they laid a stupidly simple trap and all Holmes had to do was lock him in a room. Woohoo, that's so exciting......

    The way Kane was handled was just stupid. Yeah, I expected him to be a Pit bull, not a puppy! Sorry if I sound a bit harsh, but that is about the

    thing an author can do: resolve something that is supposed to be terrifying by ending it with a joke. This author should be forced to watch the

    episode

    before he's allowed to handle dogs again.

    It's such a shame. This had potential. But it just did not seem like a Holmesian case and was not very grounded in reality at all, something that I have come to expect from good Holmes pastiches.

    Oh, and just a little advice for anyone writing a Holmes pastiche.

    After all, you don't want to get carried away.

  • James Swenson

    A character named Sherlock Holmes, who shares the name, occupation, and nationality (but not the personality) of the famous detective, is menaced by human-animal crossbreeds.

    These monsters are the product of a serum that, injected into a living creature, causes instant "evolution" in that creature.

    You don't have to be a Holmes purist to recognize idiocy when you see it.

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