The White Road

The White Road

John Connolly thrilled readers with his bestselling novels, "Every Dead Thing, Dark Hollow," and "The Killing Kind." Now he delivers spellbinding suspense as Charlie Parker races to unravel a brutal crime committed in the Deep South. After years of suffering unfathomable pain and guilt over the murders of his wife and daughter, private detective Charlie Parker has finally...

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Title:The White Road
Author:John Connolly
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Edition Language:English

The White Road Reviews

  • Dirk Grobbelaar

    This is the fourth

    book. At this stage the series isn’t showing any sign of running out of momentum or

    .

    Yes, the

    novels are

    and

    , but they’re also singularly

    . Connolly has a

    writing style.

    Thes

    This is the fourth

    book. At this stage the series isn’t showing any sign of running out of momentum or

    .

    Yes, the

    novels are

    and

    , but they’re also singularly

    . Connolly has a

    writing style.

    These are

    novels. There is a supernatural undercurrent that is becoming a little more prominent with each outing. It’s not intrusive, but there’s certainly no denying that it’s not

    as subtle, ambiguous or easy to dismiss here as it is in the first few novels. It’s still fairly open to interpretation, though, so even if the fantastical does not appeal to you, you can easily still enjoy these novels.

    Connolly definitely has a flair for this kind of thing: these novels are pretty

    . They are also

    and saturated with ambience.

    kept me enthralled right to the satisfying climax.

    There really isn’t much point in starting the series here. There is a very distinctive and definitive pattern to Charlie Parker’s character development and the story progression in general. You really need to start with

    . The novels get darker with each installment, and it’s a truly fascinating journey…

    … even if there is a fair amount of tragedy to be found between these pages. If you are a fan of horror-tinged mystery-thrillers, and not averse to a severe case of gooseflesh, you owe it to yourself to read this series!

    lost

    nothing

  • Chris

    I have to start this off with a word of caution. To truly enjoy this absolutely amazing series, you have to start at the beginning. Starting anywhere other than Book 1---All The Dead Things and reading each book in order---should be punishable by public flogging. Would you recommend watching the Star Wars Trilogy in reverse order? Didn’t think so. This series is thought out in the big picture and each book builds on and relates back to the ones that precede it. It would be a crime to read them o

    I have to start this off with a word of caution. To truly enjoy this absolutely amazing series, you have to start at the beginning. Starting anywhere other than Book 1---All The Dead Things and reading each book in order---should be punishable by public flogging. Would you recommend watching the Star Wars Trilogy in reverse order? Didn’t think so. This series is thought out in the big picture and each book builds on and relates back to the ones that precede it. It would be a crime to read them out of order.

    I am only on episode 4 in this series and am deliberately spacing out the books to prolong the enjoyment. I am glad that I came to this series late because I have quite a few volumes before I have to wait for Mr. Connolly to write new installments.

    The White Road is a place. Well, maybe a location is a better word. A metaphysical highway leading to….not sure yet, that is probably a few books ahead. The White Road is traveled by the dead, some of the living with special talents, and others that were never alive, or at least never fully human. The supernatural elements that were only hinted at in Every Dead Thing and Dark Hollow and started to gather in the wings in The Killing Kind are making their presence known as we begin to travel down the White Road.

    What sets this already amazing weird detective series apart from all others is Connolly’s skill. The man can write circles around 99% of the writers today. Alternating between poetic dark mysticism and savage crime fiction this series is spellbinding in the true sense. Every time I open one of these books I pretty much am no good to anyone for the couple of days it takes to read the story. You are under its spell and will think about it pretty much every minute until you finish. These are realistic detective stories with a dark undercurrent that whispers of demonic origins.

    Add to this Connolly’s characters. A cast of villains that are so over the top, so savage and hateful, so downright creepy, that you feel their presence as you read. Each book brings a set of flawed characters that you will root for or despise, but never forget. And then there are Charlie Parker, Louis and Angel. Louis, a semi-retired assassin so deadly that the mob has decided to leave him alone because it is just too dangerous to try to kill him and risk pissing him off; Louis’ significant other Angel, a non-apologetic thief who will follow Parker to the end of the earth and beyond because, as he says, some debts can never be paid. Louis and Angel are the muscle, and at times the laugh out loud humor, behind Parker’s brains and passion for justice as he travels down the White Road, seeking out the Dark Angels who bring horror and devastation to the world and, hopefully, not losing all that he loves in the process.

  • Fiona

    That honeycomb world John Connolly introduced us to in

    is back - and the one thing you can rely on when the past decides to pay a visit to the present is that ghosts might be sad, or lonely, or forgotten; but they're also angry.

    This book links closely to the last, though (as it should be) you can read each book as a standalone. There's enough here to clue you in to the last without spoilers, but this series is starting to build its own honeycomb foundation, and there's major eve

    That honeycomb world John Connolly introduced us to in

    is back - and the one thing you can rely on when the past decides to pay a visit to the present is that ghosts might be sad, or lonely, or forgotten; but they're also angry.

    This book links closely to the last, though (as it should be) you can read each book as a standalone. There's enough here to clue you in to the last without spoilers, but this series is starting to build its own honeycomb foundation, and there's major events in here that carry more weight when you know the past that they link to.

    John Connolly has turned his attention to the South US in this instalment, and when you're talking ghosts of the past, the South has plenty. There's a scene at the beginning, where folks are on their way out for an afternoon of wholesome entertainment, picnicking, wives scolding their husbands for what's now considered mild bad language. And then they hang and burn a black man for breaking a window. It's jarring, and it's shocking, and the history of white supremacist groups, as well as their modern incarnations, runs all throughout this book to keep you aware that there are people out there who'd like to return to those

    days of the past. There's an added dimension, too, of reading this in 2019, 15 years after publication, and feeling like humanity has taken a recent step backwards. Still, look for the helpers, right? And they're here in plenty - the Charlie Parker books usually at least attempt to balance the dark and the light, and with the dark in this book you need one hell of a balance.

  • carol.

    Charlie Parker is still finding his way, but he is coming to understand that his form of justice has jagged edges. Louis, one of Parker's best friends, knows even more about Charlie's form of justice than he does:

    The beginning is a bit like following a trail of breadcrumbs, as Connolly recounts the public lynching of a black man in 1964, Louis settling up old debts, a retired guard in the Carolina swamp plotting revenge and Parker trying to bring closure on the case of Cassie Blythe. Parker is back to his normal cases, leaving white crime behind, but still trying to stay close to home with Rachael pregnant with their child. He seems almost desperate for normalcy, but can't escape the ghosts of the dead and his feeling of obligation. To make matters worse, Faulkner, the evil preacher from the last story, is about to be freed from jail, and Parker, Louis and Angel know they'll be first on his list.

    A lawyer friend from NYPD days calls from South Carolina, wanting Parker to find information exonerating his client, Artys Jones, a poor black man, from the rape and murder of a white woman. The woman, Marianne Larousse, is the daughter of a man who virtually owns the the area with tobacco, oil wells, mining and factories, so despite Marianne and Artys seeing each other, no one is inclined to give him the benefit of the doubt.

    Wrapped around and threaded through the case in Carolina of the dead woman is the history of racism in the south. It was chilling coincidence that I read this as #45 talked about 'both sides doing wrong' at a white supremacist rally where a peaceful counter-protestor was killed. It was clear that Connolly did a lot of research about hate groups in the Southern U.S. as a connection develops between the Neo-Nazi movements, the white supremacists and the fringe. It is rare to learn so much from a thriller, but it gave a horrifying feel of realness about the story, that different kinds of crazy might align themselves together to consolidate a power base.

    Much more would run the risk of spoiling. I thought that this was a much stronger book than the previous ones for me, with better balance between the evil and the philosophy. The setting was extremely well done, from an endless swampy wilderness, to a run down industrial area. The mystery had a couple of solid twists, making it satisfactory on that level as well. If anything, this reminded me of a more horrific Tana French (these Irish!). Definitely not one I read before bedtime, at the risk of adrenaline twitches. There's even a tiny bit of humor mixed in, as one of Parker's contacts is looking for help finding a date in return for a professional favor. My only complaint would be that the resolution to all the threads (but not the mystery) felt rushed and over convenient, with an odd switch into third person omniscient that contrasted uncomfortably with the Parker's first person and the occasional cut of third person limited used in the rest of the story. Overall, though, that was a minor complaint that only stood out because the rest of it was so interesting and full. I'll definitely move on to the next.

  • Heidi

    Review to follow.

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