The Unquiet

The Unquiet

"But that is the nature of revenge. It escalates. It cannot be controlled. One hurt invites another, on and on until the original injury is all but forgotten in the chaos of what follows."John Connolly's originality and talent for storytelling have quickly made him one of today's preeminent thriller writers. Now, in "The Unquiet, " private detective Charlie Parker returns...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Unquiet
Author:John Connolly
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Unquiet Reviews

  • carol.

    Intense.

    Connolly writes detective-style mysteries with a dash of supernatural elements. The trouble is, neither Parker, nor the reader, is entirely sure what might just be unusual and what might be somewhat otherworldly. Parker, his lead character, has been haunted by the ghosts of his wife and child since they were killed, and once again, Parker is struggling with their ghosts. They're real enough that others can sense them, although his estranged wife, Rachel, points out that in her perception

    Intense.

    Connolly writes detective-style mysteries with a dash of supernatural elements. The trouble is, neither Parker, nor the reader, is entirely sure what might just be unusual and what might be somewhat otherworldly. Parker, his lead character, has been haunted by the ghosts of his wife and child since they were killed, and once again, Parker is struggling with their ghosts. They're real enough that others can sense them, although his estranged wife, Rachel, points out that in her perception, ghosts are kept alive by people refusing to let go of the past. Parker is still at their house in Maine, taking small jobs like the one for Rebecca, who has a stalker. It turns out that the stalker has a somewhat sympathetic cause, trying to find Rebecca's father, a psychologist who worked with abused children, and who was last seen about the same time as his own daughter. Parker, empathetic both to woman in distress and parents of missing children, finds himself drawn deep into the case.

    I literally had to take breaks from this book. Not because it was horrific, but because it was so intense. While building the plot tension, Connolly creates a vivid world with lush description. There are tiny moments of humor that made me smile, almost gratefully, with the opportunity to provide breathing space. Here's one tiny bit, right before Parker heads into an emotionally fraught interview in a Supermax.

    There's also solid social commentary snuck in about Supermax prisons, mental health, and the complicated issues around child abuse. As always, the lovely writing encouraged me to go slow, to linger on each image. I wanted to find out the end, but yet dreaded the final confrontation, the solution that I knew would be terrible and heart-wrenching. Without doubt, I'll go on to the next book, but I might wait a spell before doing so.

    Four-and-a-half stars, rounding up for leaving me breathless.

  • Kimberly

    One of the most straight-forward of the Charlie Parker novels I have read, and quite possibly the most bleak, as well. As always, Connolly weaves a tale that is able to completely immerse you from the very beginning, and hold your attention until the final page. Angel and Louis (Connolly's usual comic-relief duo) are present in this novel, but to a much lesser degree than in some of its predecessors.

    The storyline doesn't contain as many divergent paths as earlier novels in the series, but was no

    One of the most straight-forward of the Charlie Parker novels I have read, and quite possibly the most bleak, as well. As always, Connolly weaves a tale that is able to completely immerse you from the very beginning, and hold your attention until the final page. Angel and Louis (Connolly's usual comic-relief duo) are present in this novel, but to a much lesser degree than in some of its predecessors.

    The storyline doesn't contain as many divergent paths as earlier novels in the series, but was no less intriguing for that. Connolly, as usual, knows just the right buttons to press to assure your complete attention. Another incredible read in the Charlie Parker series.

    Highly recommended!

  • Dirk Grobbelaar

    This one was dark, but for a whole different reason than the previous ones. Connolly has never been one to shy from dark and grim in his Charlie Parker series, but here he takes on the subject of child abuse. If you’ve been following the series (and you should if you haven’t) you’ll know that Parker’s life has been somewhat fraught with distress and all kinds of darkness. To paraphrase another review of this book, one would almost hope that the author would give the poor guy a break. Not here, h

    This one was dark, but for a whole different reason than the previous ones. Connolly has never been one to shy from dark and grim in his Charlie Parker series, but here he takes on the subject of child abuse. If you’ve been following the series (and you should if you haven’t) you’ll know that Parker’s life has been somewhat fraught with distress and all kinds of darkness. To paraphrase another review of this book, one would almost hope that the author would give the poor guy a break. Not here, however, as Parker is haunted by his own dead child while he tries to solve the mystery of a disappeared psychiatrist, an investigation which opens up a wormy can of ugly things (notably the aforementioned child abuse). It’s a mystery in the best tradition of detective fiction, but with the trademark tinge of ambiguous supernaturalism slightly tuned down. Just slightly. Because, you see, … hollow men.

    This wasn’t the easiest book to read, because of the subject matter. As such, it isn’t an easy review to write, so I’ll stop now and just leave this exit statement:

  • Brandon

    In March of 2009, I started reading Charlie’s journey through the criminal underworld with “Every Dead Thing”. While having a little supernatural stuff thrown in there, his character reminded me of a “Batman-ish” vigilante. You had the classic story line of a traumatic event happening to an undeserving person which leads into spending their life trying to make amends for what happened. I loved it – I was hooked right away. The first book was full of such anger, he hated the world and wanted just

    In March of 2009, I started reading Charlie’s journey through the criminal underworld with “Every Dead Thing”. While having a little supernatural stuff thrown in there, his character reminded me of a “Batman-ish” vigilante. You had the classic story line of a traumatic event happening to an undeserving person which leads into spending their life trying to make amends for what happened. I loved it – I was hooked right away. The first book was full of such anger, he hated the world and wanted justice for the murder of his wife and child.

    With Connolly’s “The Unquiet”, we’re six books in and two removed from one of the best Parker novels yet, “The White Road”. In this installment, we find Parker dealing with the separation from the mother of his second child. He picks up a job protecting the daughter of a long since missing child psychologist, Daniel Clay. Daniel’s daughter, Rebecca, is being troubled by a man who believes Daniel is still alive. The man in question, Merrick, desperately wants to find the location of Daniel about some unfinished business. Daniel Clay’s disappearance is linked to a scandal involving a case of alleged child abuse leading to death which had subsequently ruined his career. However, nothing was actually confirmed on whether Mr. Clay had anything to do with the events in question, just that his disappearance seems to indicate his involvement.

    Parker’s life is just a huge mess. He can’t seem to make a decision between what he believes is his moral obligation to seek out and help those troubled in life and accepting his role as a father and family man. The novel spends a good chunk of time on the personal life; heavily sinking into Parker’s dilemma. It’s like he’s just sulking around, hoping things will clear themselves up. He seems to have no desire to make any sort of final decision.

    Despite my feelings on Parker, his associates Louis and Angel remain excellent. Louis has some of the best lines I’ve read in this series. From his rant on hockey to his explanation of his political views; I just loved him.

    I’m a huge fan of Connolly’s wit and sarcastic humor but with a brooding Parker, the novel seems to just fall a little short of what I’m used to. Maybe that’s what Connolly was going for but it’s not something I’m a fan of – at least not this far into the Parker saga. I think the novel also suffered from its length. Finishing at just over 500 pages, I felt it could have been a little tighter. A lot seemed like filler to me.

    Despite my overall feelings toward the book, it had a superb ending. Connolly wraps things up well and treats the reader to an epilogue which progresses to the next book nicely. I have to admit, I was intrigued by something hinted at in the final pages – enough to make me pick up the next book right away. Actually, the final 100 pages or so really saved this. If not for some key events occurring before the conclusion, this could’ve been completely forgettable and feel like a less than perfect entry in the Parker series.

    Cross Posted @

  • K.D. Absolutely

    is an ex-New York police officer. Now working as a private detective, he is also hunting the killer of his wife and daughter. A mother named

    hires him to shoo away

    a.k.a. “Revenger” who is stalking and tormenting Rebecca and her daughter. Merrick wants to know the true whereabouts of Rebecca’s father

    who mysteriously disappeared five years ago. Daniel Clay used to work as a psychiatrist specializing in abused children. Parker is torn b

    is an ex-New York police officer. Now working as a private detective, he is also hunting the killer of his wife and daughter. A mother named

    hires him to shoo away

    a.k.a. “Revenger” who is stalking and tormenting Rebecca and her daughter. Merrick wants to know the true whereabouts of Rebecca’s father

    who mysteriously disappeared five years ago. Daniel Clay used to work as a psychiatrist specializing in abused children. Parker is torn between the people who want to know the truth and those who want it to remain as mystery forever. Parker does not know that Merrick is being used by a sinister old lawyer. The said lawyer wants to settle old scores with Parker. Parker goes to a place called Gilead, a mysterious place in Northern Maine where a sect has been accused of child abuse years before.

    refers to the people who abused the children in Gilead. With that as a theme, this book is bleak, full of despair and loneliness. To give you a sample, the book opens with this statement:

    It is a crime novel, yes, but has the right amount of supernatural overtone that at some point, people compare to the works of Stephen King. This markedly differentiates him from his competitors in suspense thriller genre like Robert Ludlum, Jeffrey Archer, Vince Flynn or even Dan Brown. For this reason, this book will

    be my first and last John Connolly. I enjoy some amount of supernatural or paranormal ingredients when it comes to crime novels.

    The only downside is that this is my first John Connolly and I struggled with his recurring characters aside from detective Charlie Parker.

    and

    are Parker’s close friends and allies in combat. They are an unlikely couple whose quibbles and good humor are sometimes the source of comic relief. Louis is a huge black man who used to be a hired killer while Angel is a small white man and ex-burglar. I also felt that the character of

    should have been given more meat as it is very interesting. According to Wiki, he was an actual person with a concession stand at Old Orchard Beach in Maine. He was a part of state’s cultural heritage.

    The book maybe dark and sad but it is definitely interesting, prose is taut and clear and there is a bit of light (hope) at the end of the tunnel of loneliness and despair.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.