I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban

I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban

I come from a country that was created at midnight. When I almost died it was just after midday.When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education.On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at p...

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Title:I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban
Author:Malala Yousafzai
Rating:
Edition Language:English

I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban Reviews

  • Diane

    Reading this book reminded me of how much I take for granted every day: Freedom of speech. Freedom of religion. The freedom to go to the store without needing a male escort. And the ability to get an education, regardless of gender.

    "I was a girl in a land where rifles are fired in celebration of a son, while daughters are hidden away behind a curtain, their role in life simply to prepare food and give birth to children."

    Malala, who is now 16, is an outspoken advocate for girls to have the same r

    Reading this book reminded me of how much I take for granted every day: Freedom of speech. Freedom of religion. The freedom to go to the store without needing a male escort. And the ability to get an education, regardless of gender.

    "I was a girl in a land where rifles are fired in celebration of a son, while daughters are hidden away behind a curtain, their role in life simply to prepare food and give birth to children."

    Malala, who is now 16, is an outspoken advocate for girls to have the same right to go to school as boys. In her native Pakistan, she lost that ability when the Taliban took over: "I was 10 when the Taliban came to our valley ... It seemed to us that the Taliban arrived in the night just like vampires. They appeared in groups, armed with knives and Kalashnikovs ... They looked so dark and dirty and that my father's friend described them as 'people deprived of baths and barbers.'"

    The Taliban started bombing schools and decreed that girls couldn't get an education. Malala's father was a school principal and encouraged her to speak out. She was only 15 at the time, but threats were made against her and her family. And in October 2012, when she was riding the school bus with her friends, a man with a gun climbed aboard the vehicle and shot Malala in the head.

    Amazingly, Malala survived the bullet and was able to recover. She and her family currently live in England, but Malala writes about how much she misses her home country and wishes she could return to be with her friends. Her graciousness was such that she did not wish revenge on her attacker, and instead prays for peace.

    "I thank Allah for the hardworking doctors, for my recovery and for sending us to this world where we may struggle for our survival. Some people choose good ways and some choose bad ways. One person's bullet hit me. It swelled my brain, stole my hearing and cut the nerve of my left face in the space of a second. And after that one second there were millions of people praying for my life and talented doctors who gave me my body back. I was a good girl. In my heart I had only the desire to help people."

    Malala's story is both heartbreaking and inspiring. I admire her courage and her tenacity, and also hope that her country will one day find peace. "Why are we Muslims fighting with each other? ... We should focus on practical issues. We have so many people in our country who are illiterate, and many women have no education at all. We live in a place where schools are blown up. We have no reliable electricity supply. Not a single day passes without the killing of at least one Pakistani."

    The book is lovingly written, and I also appreciated her stories about the history of Pakistan and her people, the Pashtuns. While reading the book I realized that I knew more about the history of other countries in the region, such as Afghanistan, Iran and India, than I did about Pakistan, and it was very informative. I would highly recommend the book to anyone interested in women's rights, current events, history or inspirational memoirs.

    "Today we all know education is our basic right. Not just in the West; Islam too has given us this right. Islam says every girl and every boy should go to school. In the Quran it is written, God wants us to have knowledge. He wants us to know why the sky is blue and about oceans and stars ... The Taliban could take our pens and books, but they couldn't stop our minds from thinking."

    I was thrilled to hear that Malala had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her humanitarian work. I have recommended this book to numerous people in the past year, and am still amazed by her courage. Three cheers for Malala!

  • Natasha

    Being a fellow Muslim, I was indeed intrigued and awed by the courage of this young girl who is brave enough to state out what is wrong with her country and strive for education to be available for all.

    Coming from a country where education is a main priority and females over populated the men in schools,colleges and universities, I was indeed aghast to discovered that in certain parts of the world, women are being treated as second class citizens. It brought a tear to my eyes, how Malala and her

    Being a fellow Muslim, I was indeed intrigued and awed by the courage of this young girl who is brave enough to state out what is wrong with her country and strive for education to be available for all.

    Coming from a country where education is a main priority and females over populated the men in schools,colleges and universities, I was indeed aghast to discovered that in certain parts of the world, women are being treated as second class citizens. It brought a tear to my eyes, how Malala and her friends struggled to continue their education despite the horrors of war, earthquake and ongoing power struggle between the military and the Islamic militants in Pakistan. Certainly Malala owed much of her courage from her own father who is an education activist and is the owner of a private school. Their family background and details about the Swat Valley is described vividly in the book and readers get to know more about the places that she have lived and been to.

    This book should be given out to every teens so that they would realised how important an education is and not to think of schooling so lightly. I felt so grateful to be able to live in a country where although the majority are Muslims, the women are not banned from attending schools and told to stay at homes to serve the men. Thank you, Malala for bringing attention to your plight. Isn't it ironic that instead of silencing Malala with the gunshot, the Taliban instead have given her an even bigger voice that have been heard the world over.

  • Miranda Reads

    Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani girl, was just fifteen years old when the Taliban decided

    That she was

    to be alive.

    That she was

    and so much more.

    What was the heinous, terrible actions that necessitated her being shot?

    Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani girl, was just fifteen years old when the Taliban decided

    That she was

    to be alive.

    That she was

    and so much more.

    What was the heinous, terrible actions that necessitated her being shot?

    - particularly for girls - and was doing such an inspirational job, that she became a 'problem'.

    Her father, a schoolmaster, founded many schools throughout her childhood and he always gave Malala the option to speak up for her right to education.

    She corresponded with newspapers, campaigned on the radio and even appeared on television.

    She gave

    especially the girls, who were forced to cover up and stay at home. To give up their education because it was "improper".

    Malala expressed

    for her people and for the right to education - time and time again.

    And when the Taliban heard of her, they decided that she, a fifteen year old girl,

    And so they tried. They

    on her way to school on October 9th, 2012.

    But something happened that they had not calculated -

    And the attempted murder (assassination? I think she's important enough to bump this to attempted assassination) didn't cow her or put her in her place.

    She survived and she is ready to

    This book felt like a honest chat between the author and the world - she unashamedly details the poverty, the cruelty and the losses that her family, and the families around her, suffered.

    But at the same time, she speaks so

    about her love for God, her country and even for those who attacked out of fear or misguidance.

    Normally, when there is a second author, the book begins to feel false - as in there's too much influence from the more professional writer, and that erases all of the personal voice. But that was not the case in this one.

    Malala's felt

    , the way she spoke about her life in Pakistan - from her humble beginnings to the success of her father's school -

    especially when she talked about her freedom being taken away slowly.

    This is a book that should be read by everyone - especially the those who oppose her - because if you can feel one ounce of love that Malala feels for her country and education, then I honestly don't see why anyone would keep fighting it.

    The Finer Books Club - 2018 Reading Challenge - an audiobook read by the author

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  • Tanya Tyson

    Just to be clear, the rating is for the book not the person Malala herself. I read this quickly whilst on holidays and was keen to find out more about her story after seeing a short tv piece just before leaving home. I think her story is amazing and her courage remarkable, her plight and vision inspiring but the book itself I found to be an odd mix of political and historical fact and personal reflections that didn't quite gel for me. Still a worthy read and I really appreciated the insight into

    Just to be clear, the rating is for the book not the person Malala herself. I read this quickly whilst on holidays and was keen to find out more about her story after seeing a short tv piece just before leaving home. I think her story is amazing and her courage remarkable, her plight and vision inspiring but the book itself I found to be an odd mix of political and historical fact and personal reflections that didn't quite gel for me. Still a worthy read and I really appreciated the insight into the young girls life with her family. I can see that the historical documentation that was added, presumably by the other author, is there to inform people like me who have a flimsy grasp on the political events and motivations of power brokers in that region of the world, however I found Malala's personal account to be much more interesting and think the book would have done better with a different angle that focused on just her story or even told the political through her eyes or words...I found myself wondering sometimes "who am I listening to here?" and feeling a little as if I was being coerced into forming a political opinion based on the interpretations being offered in the factual accounts.

  • Summer

    I really wanted to love this book. I don't think anyone can deny the difficulties this girl has faced or the impact she has had on the world. However, the book reads like an odd jumble of Pakistani history, politics, and personal experience that never quite comes together into a cohesive narrative. The first few chapters are very inconsistent and meander all over the place with no clear destination; it sounds more like a collection of memories or family stories interspersed with factual informat

    I really wanted to love this book. I don't think anyone can deny the difficulties this girl has faced or the impact she has had on the world. However, the book reads like an odd jumble of Pakistani history, politics, and personal experience that never quite comes together into a cohesive narrative. The first few chapters are very inconsistent and meander all over the place with no clear destination; it sounds more like a collection of memories or family stories interspersed with factual information about Pakistan and the history of the Swat valley, and I had a very difficult time staying engaged and keeping track of the many people mentioned. The story becomes a little more streamlined as Yousafzai starts to recount her older childhood years leading up to the banning of education for girls, but I still had issues with the writing. This is one of the more egregious examples, but I think it captures the serious need for editing: "The new girls had horrible stories. Ayesha told us how one day on the way home from Sangota she had seen a Taliban holding up the severed head of a policeman by its hair, blood dripping from the neck. The Sangota girls were also very bright, which meant more competition. One of them, Rida, was excellent at making speeches." (p.144). It is certainly inspirational to hear Yousafzai's and her father's stories about speaking up in defiance of politicians, local mullahs, and the Taliban, but I think many readers might lose interest trying to follow the disjointed narrative. The book feels like it was really rushed, which is a serious shame. Someone this brave and interesting deserves a better book.

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