Lazarus, Vol. 2: Lift

Lazarus, Vol. 2: Lift

While Forever keeps watch on her sister Johanna, she finds hints of rebellion brewing in LA. At the same time, the Barrets, a family of "Waste," lose their home and land, and must pursue their only chance for a better life - a 500-mile journey to Denver in the hope that one of their family will be noticed by the Carlyles and "lifted" to Serf status. Collecting LAZARUS #5-9...

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Title:Lazarus, Vol. 2: Lift
Author:Greg Rucka
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Lazarus, Vol. 2: Lift Reviews

  • Mike

    Another great Buddyread with my amazing Shallow Comics Readers for Indie week!

    My God is Forever ("Eve") a hard, cold person. Raised as she was, ever at arms' length, and constantly trained in death, tactics and diplomacy, it's no wonder - but still, man did it produce results. I'm a pretty odd duck, and I was raised pretty well all things considered. If I'd been raised like that, I think I'd be a ravaging baboon with a fixation on pleasuring myself with my own weapons.

    And sunuvabitching, they b

    Another great Buddyread with my amazing Shallow Comics Readers for Indie week!

    My God is Forever ("Eve") a hard, cold person. Raised as she was, ever at arms' length, and constantly trained in death, tactics and diplomacy, it's no wonder - but still, man did it produce results. I'm a pretty odd duck, and I was raised pretty well all things considered. If I'd been raised like that, I think I'd be a ravaging baboon with a fixation on pleasuring myself with my own weapons.

    And sunuvabitching, they bring in new characters from the Waste class, and finally give us a glimpse what it's like to live outside of ANY support network, raging chaos just outside of view of what might've passed for subsistence living, once upon a time.

    This world was fascinating enough just through the lens of The Family - now we get to see it through the eyes of Waste at the same time, for related plot lines, and maybe even see a few crossed paths? Damn guys, you're making me hard just with all this excitement of such solid storytelling.

    Gimme more now. Oh shit, I'm caught up? I think I ought to drive across town, find out where Rucka lives and show him a little Stephen-King-in-Misery hospitality.

  • Crystal Starr Light

    Bullet Review:

    Fantastic! WOW! We get background on Forever, but also we see how life is for non-family - for non-serf. The waste that populate most of the planet.

    Full Review:

    Now that we're moving into volume 2, Rucka and gang open up the story with several storylines. In the first, we see Forever training as a child, how desperately she wants the love and affection of her father and how far she will go to get that affection. The second and third stories are "main timeline" - Forever tries to sus

    Bullet Review:

    Fantastic! WOW! We get background on Forever, but also we see how life is for non-family - for non-serf. The waste that populate most of the planet.

    Full Review:

    Now that we're moving into volume 2, Rucka and gang open up the story with several storylines. In the first, we see Forever training as a child, how desperately she wants the love and affection of her father and how far she will go to get that affection. The second and third stories are "main timeline" - Forever tries to suss out the terrorist plot against the family, and the latter introduces a bunch of new characters, Joe, Bobbie, Michael, and Lee Barrett as they suffer the loss of their farm due to severe flooding.

    I adored Volume 1 - it was exactly the type of dystopian story I love to read, with great characters, an interesting, complex story and good worldbuilding. Ruck and company use Volume 2 to flesh out and expand on Volume 1 - instead of just focusing on the Carlyle family, we get to see into the life of your average "waste". And like you would expect, it isn't fun - and also like you find out, half of the battle is who you know.

    Sequels or middle-volumes are hard to write reviews for - you neither want to repeat yourself, but also, you don't want to give anything away from the earlier volumes. So pardon me as I fumble around for proper words to describe Volume 2.

    What I feel makes Volume 2 just as good as Volume 1 is that it spends time exploring Forever's background and why she does a lot of what she does. I suppose you could say, there's some pretty obvious foreshadowing of a showdown in the future, but for me, it works. Forever is a character that could easily just become a fighting machine, a Terminator. The backstory shows her humanity, while the main plotline shows her as she starts to question her surroundings.

    The other part of Volume 2 that was critical was the inclusion of the Barretts. This gives the story its reason for existing - the lives the waste live are horrible and while they may not be slaves in the traditional sense, they will be forever paying off debts to the family in economic slavery. And as I found in Volume 1, the new characters of Volume 2, namely the Barretts, are for the most part, memorable - Michael loves to read, an eternal seeker; his mother, Bobbie, is somewhat a hot-head, but passionate for her children; Joe is her calming companion. (Leigh admittedly doesn't spend much time in the book, so I am removing her from the "memorable" part.)

    The hard part for authors is following up a smash Volume 1 with a solid Volume 2, proving you have a concept, characters and story that aren't just a fluke or just work in one setting. Rucka and gang have that here - I'm currently working on Volume 3 and already I can see the world is getting ever more complicated and intriguing.

  • Chad

    Just another example of why Image is where all the best comics are published today. (My 90's self never would have thought I'd ever be saying that.) Great art by Michael Lark. Yet another great story by Greg Rucka. This man can do no wrong.

    The story follows Forever Carlyle, the youngest daughter in a family who controls the western half of the U.S. They've ground everyone else under their heels and people are barely surviving as serfs for the family. Forever is slowly discovering the underside o

    Just another example of why Image is where all the best comics are published today. (My 90's self never would have thought I'd ever be saying that.) Great art by Michael Lark. Yet another great story by Greg Rucka. This man can do no wrong.

    The story follows Forever Carlyle, the youngest daughter in a family who controls the western half of the U.S. They've ground everyone else under their heels and people are barely surviving as serfs for the family. Forever is slowly discovering the underside of her family as she provides security for their fiefdom.

  • Sesana

    Every bit as fascinating as the first volume. This volume gives more insight into the world of Lazarus, and gives a very welcome look at the "Waste" classes. I felt like there was more plot momentum and less exposition in this volume, and I'm feeling more and more comfortable in the world that Rucka is building here. I also love that this is a single, complete story, without wrapping up every single loose end in the story. I'd say that there's even more interesting things ahead for this series.

  • Veronique

    This series is gaining strength. The first volume left me wondering about how this bleak world works, especially with so few having control over so many, and how they would enforce and keep it. In light of this, it was interesting to see Forever's training flashbacks and childhood, although this is so sad. I truly want to hurt ALL the Carlyles.

    It’s also a smart move to show us people outside the ‘families’ and their efforts to survive in this unforgiving world. The Barrets’s experience is heart

    This series is gaining strength. The first volume left me wondering about how this bleak world works, especially with so few having control over so many, and how they would enforce and keep it. In light of this, it was interesting to see Forever's training flashbacks and childhood, although this is so sad. I truly want to hurt ALL the Carlyles.

    It’s also a smart move to show us people outside the ‘families’ and their efforts to survive in this unforgiving world. The Barrets’s experience is heart-breaking.

    This is not the nicest narrative, with all thise violence and pain and death, but it has caught my interest. Who is contacting Eve and telling her about her ‘father and siblings’???? And what will happen when she finally believes it?

  • Kaitlin

    This is a volume that I was very excited to get to because I only very recently picked up Volume 1 and was blown away by how much I ended up enjoying the concept of this world and the character of Forever. In this book we get introduced to a few more of the characters such as the 'Barrets'. I have to say that this book was very captivating and I found myself wanting to pick it up as soon as I could to read and enjoy it because I was so sure it would be wonderful, and it didn't disappoint.

    In this

    This is a volume that I was very excited to get to because I only very recently picked up Volume 1 and was blown away by how much I ended up enjoying the concept of this world and the character of Forever. In this book we get introduced to a few more of the characters such as the 'Barrets'. I have to say that this book was very captivating and I found myself wanting to pick it up as soon as I could to read and enjoy it because I was so sure it would be wonderful, and it didn't disappoint.

    In this storyline we not only meet the Waste Barret family (waste is the population who do not have any protection from a 'Family' [a ruling power in this dystopian future] and are usually not well off or well looked after) but we also get to learn more about the Family, the dynamics of the world, and the past of Eve (aka Forever).

    I found the introduction of the Barret family to be a fairly easy one to connect with because they were instantly in trouble and couldn't get the hep that they needed, making them an easy set of characters to feel for. I liked Leigh and Michael, the brother and sister, and I also liked the girlfriend of Michael who accompanies them a lot. They were all people who seemed to have a pretty bad lot in life, but they made the most of it, and I could feel for them and root for them.

    The backstory for Eve was also something I enjoyed a lot. We got to see more of how she toughened herself up and made herself the Family Lazarus (essentially a specially designed bodyguard/hit-woman). I liked that we now understand more of her history, and I look forward to seeing what she will do about the messages she keeps getting (which is something we haven't resolved yet, but which promises to be messy when it is addressed no doubt).

    The artwork of these is not my favourite by any means, but it's easy enough to follow and connect with the characters still and the musty muted tones do seem to work well with the world. I liked the sunset scenes and the night time scenes which were more beautiful and showed that there are still moments of wonder, even in such a messed up world.

    Overall this was once again a very wonderful read from the team of Lazarus and I will be on the look out and ready to pick up volume 3 whenever I can find it because I certainly want to know what is going to happen next and the whole 'lift' storyline and idea was very fascinating to me. 4.5*s and certainly a recommended graphic novel!

  • Tina Haigler

    I liked this one but not as much as the first. Honestly the middle was kind of confusing because two of the characters looked similar but belonged to different groups. It kind of messed me up a little bit and took some of the enjoyment out of it. All they had to do was change the hair color of one of the characters and I would've been fine. Other than that it had a good story and art. The ending was interesting and made me want to read Vol. 3.

  • Jan Philipzig

    In

    , Rucka and Lark gradually broaden the story's scope. While the first volume's focus on the intrigant upper crust sometimes felt like watching

    or

    (not an experience I am keen on), this second volume starts to explore life outside the family's guarded walls - a world defined by poverty, desperation, crime, corruption, and guerrilla activity. Nothing terribly original or surprising, but Rucka and Lark get the details right, and the result is a slow-burning, sty

    In

    , Rucka and Lark gradually broaden the story's scope. While the first volume's focus on the intrigant upper crust sometimes felt like watching

    or

    (not an experience I am keen on), this second volume starts to explore life outside the family's guarded walls - a world defined by poverty, desperation, crime, corruption, and guerrilla activity. Nothing terribly original or surprising, but Rucka and Lark get the details right, and the result is a slow-burning, stylish, relevant, increasingly complex read. My only concern is that it may be a bit

    slow-burning for its own good, as it isn't all that entertaining to watch familiar tropes in slow motion.

  • ✘✘ Sarah ✘✘ (former Nefarious Breeder of Murderous Crustaceans)

    and I am naught but a

    . Why? Because I almost gave up on this

    after reading this instalment. I thought it was

    . And kinda sorta

    . And kinda sorta

    . So I wasn't exactly

    at the prospect of reading the next volume in the series.

    , that's right. I'm a complete and total

    . Because had I given up on this

    , I wouldn't have read

    . And C

    and I am naught but a

    . Why? Because I almost gave up on this

    after reading this instalment. I thought it was

    . And kinda sorta

    . And kinda sorta

    . So I wasn't exactly

    at the prospect of reading the next volume in the series.

    , that's right. I'm a complete and total

    . Because had I given up on this

    , I wouldn't have read

    . And Conclave is

    . Hence, I am naught but a

    . QED and stuff.

    .

    ·

    :

    ★★★★

    ·

    :

    ★★★★

    ·

    :

    ★★★★

    ·

    :

    ★★★★★

  • Sam Quixote

    Hundreds of thousands flock to Denver for the “Lift”, aka the job interview from hell, where “Waste” (people who live under the Families’ rule but are unemployed) get the chance to be “Serfs” (receive jobs and in return get a better way of life for them and theirs). Meanwhile, there’s a threat against the Carlyle family that Forever must neutralise, and we’re introduced to the Barrets, a “Waste” family, who lose their home and make the journey to Denver to try and become “Serfs”.

    Lazarus Volume 2

    Hundreds of thousands flock to Denver for the “Lift”, aka the job interview from hell, where “Waste” (people who live under the Families’ rule but are unemployed) get the chance to be “Serfs” (receive jobs and in return get a better way of life for them and theirs). Meanwhile, there’s a threat against the Carlyle family that Forever must neutralise, and we’re introduced to the Barrets, a “Waste” family, who lose their home and make the journey to Denver to try and become “Serfs”.

    Lazarus Volume 2 is largely a setup book. It explains Greg Rucka and Michael Lark’s dystopian future world a bit more while introducing new characters that, given the amount of space allocated to them, will likely have a major role to play in future volumes. Unfortunately, this is also a very dreary read with Rucka borrowing heavily from other dystopian sci-fis and not bringing enough of his own to the series or developing the story he started fairly well in the first volume.

    One story thread follows Forever as a kid, training vigorously to become the killing machine her father wants her to be. We return to this flashback throughout the book and all that happens is that she’s not good enough at first and then she is by the end. Predictable and boring.

    In fact, Forever steps back quite a bit in this volume as she’s involved in more of a background plot. In the present, she’s looking for a terrorist group with her family’s name on a bomb. Think she stops them in the end? And that’s that plotline! Again, predictable and boring.

    Instead of this it would’ve been preferable if Rucka had explored the idea of the Lazarus itself – where did this come from? Why is it that each ruling family has one and only one? Rather than look into this, we get the dreary terrorist subplot and the repetitive training scenes.

    The bulk of the story concerns new characters, the Barrets, as they lose their home in Montana and hit the road to Denver. It’s a tough world surviving out there in this dystopian future where everything sucks, and they struggle against bandits and a total lack of resources. It’s a scenario that anyone who’s read/watched their share of sci-fi will have seen innumerable times before and Rucka’s rendering is nothing short of drearily unimpressive. I’ll just say it: Robert Kirkman does this scenario so much better in The Walking Dead, and I’m not even that much of a fan of that series either!

    There’s one cool scene near the start where Forever visits her family’s border with rival group, Bittner and Hock, one of whose soldiers shoots Forever, but of course she heals. Rather than picking up her own gun and taking him out, she uses her words to have the soldier’s own people punish him for his potshot. It’s an imaginative and original moment which is why it stood out to me amidst the rest of this rote story.

    Rucka’s storytelling is very unimaginative but his writing is competent and Michael Lark’s art is very good. I can’t fault Lazarus Volume 2 too much on a technical level, but the story is unappealing, very dull and overly miserable without any payoff. I realise this is only Volume 2 so there’s unlikely to be any payoff yet but I’m not encouraged to go any further to see what happens next. I simply don’t care about any of these characters or their world - I don’t think this series is for me.

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