Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World

Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World

Alternate cover for this ISBN can be found hereFrom the coauthors of the New York Times bestseller Abundance comes their much anticipated follow-up: Bold—a radical, how-to guide for using exponential technologies, moonshot thinking, and crowd-powered tools to create extraordinary wealth while also positively impacting the lives of billions.Bold unfolds in three parts. Part One focu/>...

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Title:Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World
Author:Peter H. Diamandis
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Edition Language:English

Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World Reviews

  • Cody Shorter

    11 Things I learnt from Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World (Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler)

    bold book

    1) There is so much change happening in this world at an exponential rate. It amazes me how much technology is impacting us and will continue to do so.

    From the book:

    Consider that, twenty years ago, the idea that a computer algorithm could help companies with funny names (Uber, Airbnb, Quirky) dematerialize twentieth-century businesses

    11 Things I learnt from Bold: How to Go Big, Create Wealth and Impact the World (Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler)

    bold book

    1) There is so much change happening in this world at an exponential rate. It amazes me how much technology is impacting us and will continue to do so.

    From the book:

    Consider that, twenty years ago, the idea that a computer algorithm could help companies with funny names (Uber, Airbnb, Quirky) dematerialize twentieth-century businesses would have seemed delusional. Fifteen years ago, if you wanted access to a supercomputer, you still had to buy one (not rent one by the minute on the cloud). Ten years ago, genetic engineering was big government, and big business and 3-D printing meant expensive plastic prototypes. Seven years ago, the only robot most entrepreneurs had access to was a Roomba, and AI meant a talking ATM machine, not a freeway-driving autonomous car. Two years ago, the idea of living past a hundred was a crazy idea. You get the picture.

    2) The Six D’s of Exponentials.

    From the book:

    I have developed a framework called the Six Ds of Exponentials. These Six Ds are a chain reaction of technological progression, a road map of rapid development that always leads to enormous upheaval and opportunity.

    Digitalisation. This idea starts with the fact that culture makes progress cumulative. Innovation occurs as humans share and exchange ideas. I build on your idea; you build on mine.

    Deception. What follows digitalisation is deception, a period during which exponential growth goes mostly unnoticed. This happens because the doubling of small numbers often produces results so minuscule they are often mistaken for the plodder’s progress of linear growth.

    Disruption. In simple terms, a disruptive technology is any innovation that creates a new market and disrupts an existing one.

    Demonetisation. This means the removal of money from the equation.

    Dematerialisation. While demonetisation describes the vanishing of the money once paid for goods and services, dematerialisation is about the vanishing of the goods and services themselves.

    Democratisation is what happens when hard costs drop so low they becomes available and affordable to just about everyone.

    3) Attitude is everything

    From the book:

    Climbing Mount Bold is not just technologically difficult, it’s also incredibly psychologically difficult. Every innovator interviewed for this book emphasized the importance of the mental game, arguing that without the right mindset, entrepreneurs have absolutely no chance of success. I couldn’t agree more. Attitude is the ball game. If you think you can or think you can’t—well, you’re right.

    4) You have to get use to everyone thinking you and your ideas are crazy.

    From the book

    As Burt Rutan, winner of the Ansari XPRIZE, once taught me: “The day before something is truly a breakthrough, it’s a crazy idea.” Trying out crazy ideas means bucking expert opinion and taking big risks. It means not being afraid to fail. Because you will fail. The road to bold is paved with failure, and this means having a strategy in place to handle risk and learn from mistakes is critical.

    5) Flow is an incredible way to hack productivity. Flow is something that really interests me and I will definitely be checking it out more.

    From the book

    As Virgin CEO Richard Branson says, “In two hours [in flow], I can accomplish tremendous things . . . It’s like there’s no challenge I can’t meet.”

    6) You’ve got to start somewhere. If you don’t have a following or a source of credibility, create one.

    From the book:

    So if you’re lacking a track record, make one. Start your bold project with a much smaller effort aimed at letting others see you pull it off.

    7) Create a set of principles/values you live by

    From the book:

    Start collecting mind hacks by examining your own life and seeing what strategies consistently worked along the way. Turn those strategies into your laws. Why is this so important? Because fear is hell on decision making. As threat levels begin to rise, the brain starts limiting our options. The fight-or-flight response is the extreme version of this story. When we are confronting mortal terror, our choices are literally limited to three: fight, flight, or freeze. But the same thing starts to happen with lesser fears. As Emory University neuroeconomist Gregory Berns wrote in an article for the New York Times: “Fear prompts retreat. It is the antipode of progress.” And that’s why it’s important to write down your own laws. You’re essentially creating an external hard drive for when your internal hard drive is guaranteed to crash.

    8) Passion and purpose are key:

    From the book:

    So what’s his secret? Musk has a few, but none are more important to him than passion and purpose. “I didn’t go into the rocket business, the car business, or the solar business thinking this is a great opportunity. I just thought, in order to make a difference, something needed to be done. I wanted to have an impact. I wanted to create something substantially better than what came before.” Musk, like every entrepreneur in this chapter, is driven by passion and purpose. Why? Passion and purpose scale—always have, always will. Every movement, every revolution, is proof of this fact. Plus, doing anything big and bold is difficult, and at two in the morning for the fifth night in a row, when you need to keep going, you’re only going to fuel yourself from deep within. You’re not going to push ahead when it’s someone else’s mission. It needs to be yours.

    9) The book delves into the traits of Richard Branson, Elon Musk, Larry Page and Jeff Bezos. What was interesting was that they all have different tolerances for risk. There are many paths to greatness. Below is Elon Musks’ take on risk:

    From the book

    “The lesson I would pass on to others,” he says, “the one rule I would have for entrepreneurs is, Don’t leave any dollars in reserve, you can always feed yourself, but don’t leave money on the table. I spent it all.”

    10) Incentive prizes are now easier to accomplish through the HeroX platform. Incentive prizes, when used correctly (the book sets out an impressive step by step how-to) can leverage money and knowledge.

    11) Ideas can turn into reality much easier with today’s technology, however we can’t just rely on technology

    From the book:

    Here’s the most important point: Abundance is not a techno-utopian vision. Technology alone will not bring us this better world. It is up to you and me. To bring on this better world is going to require what could easily be the largest cooperative effort in history. In other words, there is a bold and bright future out there. But, as with everything else, what happens next is up to us.

    All in all, a brilliant inspiring book. One i’ll no doubt read again.

  • J.F. Penn

    Fantastic book which sparked tons of ideas for me. Should be required reading for all entrepreneurs or indeed anyone interested in where the world is heading in the next 10-20 years. Just wow!

  • Jay Dawkins

    Peter's laws:

    1. If anything can go wrong, Fix It!!… to hell with Murphy!

    2. When given a choice… take both!!

    3. Multiple projects lead to multiple successes.

    4. Start at the top, then work your way up.

    5. Do it by the book… but be the author!

    6. When forced to compromise, ask for more.

    7. If you can’t win, change the rules.

    8. If you can’t change the rules, then ignore them.

    9. Perfection is not optional.

    10. When faced without a challenge, make one.

    11. “No” simply means begin again at on

    Peter's laws:

    1. If anything can go wrong, Fix It!!… to hell with Murphy!

    2. When given a choice… take both!!

    3. Multiple projects lead to multiple successes.

    4. Start at the top, then work your way up.

    5. Do it by the book… but be the author!

    6. When forced to compromise, ask for more.

    7. If you can’t win, change the rules.

    8. If you can’t change the rules, then ignore them.

    9. Perfection is not optional.

    10. When faced without a challenge, make one.

    11. “No” simply means begin again at one level higher.

    12. Don’t walk when you can run.

    13. When in doubt: THINK!

    14. Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is a blessing.

    15. The squeaky wheel gets replaced.

    16. The faster you move, the slower time passes, the longer you live.

    17. The best way to predict the future is to create it yourself!

    18. The ratio of something to nothing is infinite.

    19. You get what you incentivize.

    20. If you think it is impossible, then it is… for you.

    21. An expert is someone who can tell you exactly how it can’t be done.

    22. The day before something is a breakthrough, it’s a crazy idea.

    23. If it were easy it would have been done already.

    24. Without a target you’ll miss it every time.

    25. Fail early, fail often, fail forward!

    26. If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.

    27. The world’s most precious resource is the persistent and passionate human mind.

    28. Bureaucracy is an obstacle to conquer with persistence, confidence and a bulldozer when necessary.

    Awesome read. Inspiring. Now back to work!

  • Jose Papo

    Bold is a great book and it talks about the new technological trends and also on the power of platforms based on the six Ds: Digitalization, Deception, Destruction, Demonetization, Dematerialization Democratization. It also talks a lot about moonshot thinking and crowdsourcing strategies. I gave 4 stars because I believe that the book "Exponential Organizations" by Salim Ismail of Singularity University is more practical and already have many of the ideas found on "Bold".

  • Bob Page

    There's a ton of useful information about crowdsourcing and crowdfunding here, but the book is very focused on starting things and incentivizing people rather than the far more difficult and interesting slog of actually doing the work. For example, we're told we need more flow and get 17 flow triggers, but the authors don't tell us how they've re-arranged their lives to be in flow. Omissions like this make some of the concepts feel superficial. If you're interesting in crowdsourcing, crowdfundin

    There's a ton of useful information about crowdsourcing and crowdfunding here, but the book is very focused on starting things and incentivizing people rather than the far more difficult and interesting slog of actually doing the work. For example, we're told we need more flow and get 17 flow triggers, but the authors don't tell us how they've re-arranged their lives to be in flow. Omissions like this make some of the concepts feel superficial. If you're interesting in crowdsourcing, crowdfunding, or how to be Diamandis, it's well worth reading. But this is far more narrow than the promised "go big, create wealth, and impact the world". Cast by the wayside is the technician/operator advantage of being insanely good at a few things. (Diamandis's rules include "When given a choice... take both!" and "Multiple projects lead to multiple successes.") There isn't a whole lot of practical advice here on what you need to find business partners, operate a company, monopolize the market, etc.

    Entrepeneurs Organization has a rule: "Members don’t give advice; they speak from prior experience" - and the strongest parts of the book are where Diamandis is directly recounting his experience starting Space Adventures and Starfleet Academy, not giving generalized advice. Perhaps this would have been better if Diamandis just wrote a memoir with all of his businesses and left out the hype, advice, and Kotler's flow research (which is already available in another book.)

  • Risto Kärkkäinen

    If (you are interested in making a positive impact) {

    read this.

    }

    else {

    continue rereading fifty shades of grey.

    }

  • Kit Pang

    Great read for entrepreneurs and anyone interested in today's technology and thinking BIG

  • The

    Google did this, Facebook did that, Richard Branson is ballsy....

  • HBalikov

    Despite what it says in the title, this is not a "how to" book, it is an inspirational book. There are plenty of "case studies" to demonstrate that wealth can be created and you can have impact on those around you and, maybe even those you don't know. However, this is no more a road map than Columbus had when he departed on his trip to the Far East.

    I was a bit more disappointed with the chapter on building communities. There are plenty of lists but, as was said about many a river in Texas, it m

    Despite what it says in the title, this is not a "how to" book, it is an inspirational book. There are plenty of "case studies" to demonstrate that wealth can be created and you can have impact on those around you and, maybe even those you don't know. However, this is no more a road map than Columbus had when he departed on his trip to the Far East.

    I was a bit more disappointed with the chapter on building communities. There are plenty of lists but, as was said about many a river in Texas, it may be a mile wide but only a few inches deep.

    Enjoy the inspiration; there is plenty to be inspired about. But, before you start out, get more/better advice on how to go big.

  • Tim

    This book appeared on a couple of lists of best business books. I should have been warned off by the hype of the title, "Bold--How To Go Big, Create Wealth, and Impact the World." Don't expect anything new here, it's recycled. If you haven't read anything about crowdsourcing, crowdfunding, building communities, etc. and want to catch up, maybe. But you can get up to speed on these concepts with Wikipedia in less time without the breathless delivery.

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