Night Chills

Night Chills

#1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz unleashes a contagion on a small Maine town--one that triggers the darkest desires of the soul.Designed by top scientists and unleashed in a monstrous conspiracy, night chills are seizing the men and women of Black River--driving them to acts of rape and murder. The nightmare is real. And death is the only cure......

DownloadRead Online
Title:Night Chills
Author:Dean Koontz
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Night Chills Reviews

  • Rebecca McNutt

    was one of the most disturbing Dean Koontz novels I've ever read, really shocking and creepy.

  • Fred

    *****draft****

    In my second read, I do remember Paul Annedale (widower) & Jenny (widow) fall “closer” in love & how she able to help him. It’s seems better if he had a little like this in other books.

    Leonard Dawson, General Klinger & Dr. Origen Salisbury have the

    experiment in the Black River town....taking control of men & woman.

    Salisbury’s total woman control role is

    than I remember.

    *****draft****

    In my second read, I do remember Paul Annedale (widower) & Jenny (widow) fall “closer” in love & how she able to help him. It’s seems better if he had a little like this in other books.

    Leonard Dawson, General Klinger & Dr. Origen Salisbury have the

    experiment in the Black River town....taking control of men & woman.

    Salisbury’s total woman control role is

    than I remember. Saying “I am the key” & they repeated “I am the lock”.....

    The Monthly Group Read Link above contains/prints

    One of Dean Koontz’s first books, published 1976, he was 31.

    In a Maine town, Black River; Leonard Dawson, General Klinger and Dr. Origen Salisbury lead a "Key/Lock" mind control study over the town. Their project name is "Total Behavioral Modification through Subliminal Perception".

    Salisbury uses the "Key/Lock" code phrase, saying "I am the key", the woman says the phrase "I am the lock" and then he controls the woman. Dawson & Klinger complete Black River citizen tests showing total mind control with all actions, citizens did want to escape Black River and ordered murder between themselves.

    What can four residents led by Paul Annedale & Sam Edison (and their 2 daughters) do to the 3 project leaders & the "Key/Lock" code in the town?

    I have not seen Koontz describe "incredible" and "detail" love scenes in any other book.

    (Book is on YouTube.com)

  • TK421

    Most Dean Koontz novels are a source of brain candy for me...think the gooey, dripping kind that parents never want their kids to have because they know they'll be the ones scrubbing it off the couch or inside of the car. After I read them I usually forget about them in a month or so; I might keep one or two details that make me smirk whenever I see the cover of that book.

    NIGHT CHILLS was a bit different. This book disturbed me. I have no problem with violence within the confines of

    Most Dean Koontz novels are a source of brain candy for me...think the gooey, dripping kind that parents never want their kids to have because they know they'll be the ones scrubbing it off the couch or inside of the car. After I read them I usually forget about them in a month or so; I might keep one or two details that make me smirk whenever I see the cover of that book.

    NIGHT CHILLS was a bit different. This book disturbed me. I have no problem with violence within the confines of a horror novel; I mean that is one of the central themes in these types of books, right? But what I do have a problem with is: violence as a form of masturbation. Let me elucidate. Let's say there is a killer that has been overcome with some sort of demonic possession and he then goes on a killing rampage. Okay, the author has dutifully illustrated the nefarious nature of this demon and also shown the spiritual/mental/psychological weakness of said character. I get it, no problem. But what if you have a character that figures out a way to subliminally control people for his own means? Okay, I can see where the person now in power wants to show his abilities of playing god, small g. But what if this goes on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on...(you get the picture), without a real juicy story to back it up. Well, that's exactly what happens in this novel. And it gets very tiresome reading about some psychotic playing puppet master. I WANT A STORY!! To be honest, I was getting rather bored with this novel once and set it down and then came back to it a few WEEKS later...never a good sign.

    So why the four stars? The reason is simple: The images of evil that permeate through this book were harrowing for me. Does that make it a good read? Not necessarily. But it does make it, IMO, thought provoking. Why the heck did I keep thinking about these images that I found repulsive and grotesque and filthy? Am I hardwired wrong? Is a there a darkness that resides within me that I don’t know about? I wish I had answers to these questions. What I can say is: This book makes the reader think about if they had the powers that allowed them to control somebody, would they enact the same savagery that this psychotic does? I guess I am in closer contact with the reptilian side of my brain than I thought because I wanted to think I would do good, be a super-hero, but the truth is, I cannot honestly say I would do good.

    As I said, disturbing.

    HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

  • Corey

    Just by the writing style of Night Chills, I could tell that this was an older book by Koontz. Night Chills was probably so far, for me one of his darkest books, with a few disturbing rape scenes. Aside from that, it was a good read, the mind manipulation plot was interesting, in a creepy kind of way, kind of reminded me of the Jedi Mind trick from Star Wars, HAHA! The first few chapters were slow, with a few lengthy flashbacks, but once I got past that and got to know the plot and the main char

    Just by the writing style of Night Chills, I could tell that this was an older book by Koontz. Night Chills was probably so far, for me one of his darkest books, with a few disturbing rape scenes. Aside from that, it was a good read, the mind manipulation plot was interesting, in a creepy kind of way, kind of reminded me of the Jedi Mind trick from Star Wars, HAHA! The first few chapters were slow, with a few lengthy flashbacks, but once I got past that and got to know the plot and the main characters, it became a real page-turner.

    It also has one of those crazy villains that you just want to hate so much that you hope he gets it in the end! Another winner by Dean Koontz!

  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    I wasn't supposed to read Night Chills (since I already have a lot of other books planned to read), but my eyes found it in a pile of books at home and I just felt the need for a Koontz and I'm happy I followed my instinct since it was a really good novel.

    Black River is a sleepy little town in Maine (Stephen King vibes) where the population starts getting night chills and suddenly all hell breaks loose. In the middle of the chaos stands a family that doesn't get the night chills and

    I wasn't supposed to read Night Chills (since I already have a lot of other books planned to read), but my eyes found it in a pile of books at home and I just felt the need for a Koontz and I'm happy I followed my instinct since it was a really good novel.

    Black River is a sleepy little town in Maine (Stephen King vibes) where the population starts getting night chills and suddenly all hell breaks loose. In the middle of the chaos stands a family that doesn't get the night chills and they now have to fight for their lives.

    I found that the worst thing with this book is that the night chills isn't something spooky going on, something paranormal, instead, it's an experiment conducted by three men and I have always found that the horror of the things humans do to each other is far worse than monsters under the bed or aliens in space.

    Night Chills was a well written, fast-paced book that I devoured quickly.

  • Karl Marberger

    An entertaining page-turner with some creepy science.

    There’s also some philosophizing about how humanity’s morality is effected by advanced technology. It was a fun read.

  • Edward Lorn

    Sit back and relax. We're going to be here for a while.

    First and foremost, I must appreciate how fantastic my paperback of this book smells. These old Berkley-Koontz books have a distinctly woody aroma. Less of a vanilla smell and more of a damp pine scent. Like walking through a Christmas tree farm in the rain. I've picked up Zebra novels from this era and Tor paperback originals, even a few King Pocketbook editions, and none of them smell like these old Black/Neon paperbacks. If you're not fa

    Sit back and relax. We're going to be here for a while.

    First and foremost, I must appreciate how fantastic my paperback of this book smells. These old Berkley-Koontz books have a distinctly woody aroma. Less of a vanilla smell and more of a damp pine scent. Like walking through a Christmas tree farm in the rain. I've picked up Zebra novels from this era and Tor paperback originals, even a few King Pocketbook editions, and none of them smell like these old Black/Neon paperbacks. If you're not familiar with my use of Black/Neon, the explanation is simple enough. I'm talking about any of the Dean Koontz novels published by Berkley that had a black cover with simple artwork and colorful (sometimes neon) titles and bylines. They are, in my opinion, the best of the best when it comes to Koontz. His heyday, if you will. And they smell fucking amazing.

    Now for the contents of this well-perfumed paperback.

    is nowhere near as good as I remember. In fact, I made a progress update that read:

    I lied my flabby ass off. While the ending was okay, it's not what I remembered. No worries, I will not spoil the ending for you. Suffice it to say, it does not ramp up and get crazy action-y like I thought it did. I honestly feel as if someone changed the book on me. I felt like Obi Wan had waved a hand in front of my face and said, "This is not the book you're looking for." How does one forget the entire second half of a novel while remembering the first bit? I'm going to try and explain.

    Dean Koontz has been rewriting the same ten books since around 1990. You have one of four premises: computer virus/sentient program takes over people/town; aliens; alternate reality/time manipulation; and finally psycho killer with or without government conspiracy. Each of these premises have two subcategories. There's a dog, usually a super intelligent one, in most of them and/or the love interest/main character will be a blonde woman. Most of these stories happen in Southern California so that Koontz can describe bougainvillea one of eleventy billion different ways.

    takes place in Maine, but Koontz still managed to throw in a description of bougainvillea. Now that's talent. If you can find a book Koontz has written without one of the things I've listed, I will send you a $10 Amazon Gift card. One gift card per book. Only one winner per book. You have my word. No joke. This is a serious offer.

    Now, I know what you're saying. Four premises with two subcategories is more than ten books. The math adds up to 12 different possible stories. Well, yes and no. I'm giving him the benefit of the doubt because of overlap. There is plenty of overlap in Koontz's catalog. Take for instance the ending of

    , wherein Koontz uses three of those premises in one idea. The reason I have settled on the pleasingly even number of ten is due to the fact that I can point out ten distinct Koontz novels that have been reused, at the very least, threes times in the man's career. All this because Koontz believes in the standup-comedy approach of novel writing. He might tell the same jokes every single night, but he knows there will always be someone new in the audience. The problem comes when you've traveled on tour with Koontz for the past thirty years and you've heard all these jokes thousands of times. Dean Koontz is the Paula Poundstone of the author world. Yes, Paula still has her fans, but mostly they're newcomers to her tried, tested, and perfected schtick.

    Jesus humped Mary through the Gardens of Gethsemane, I digressed. My apologies. If you're still with me, I promise I'm getting to the point.

    While I remember very clearly the first 200 pages of

    , I thought this book ended differently because Koontz has reused this idea at least four times. I have yet to find the book I was looking for, and I'm tired of hunting. I'll reread all these Black/Neon books slowly over the course of the next few years, and if I find it, fucking tremendous! If not, oh well. More than likely, I rewrote this book in my head because the ending is rather lackluster considering the build up. Koontz had such an awesome premise to work with and it all fizzled out into your typical thriller ending.

    Which leaves me to wonder: How much of this man's work did I ever truly enjoy? It's a scary thought, thinking I've built up a fabricated fandom based on my own mental rewrites of how I believe things should've been. The only consolation I have is that there are thousands of Koontz fans out there who remember his heyday, who truly adored his Black/Neon era. Either way, I will reread and review each book as I read them. Maybe by the end I will have my answer.

    In summation: This is a truly middle-ground Koontz book. It has everything we love and everything we hate about Koontz. Oh, and loads of rape scenes, which I could have done without. He definitely went full-on Laymon with this one. Considering they were good friends, Dick probably read Dean's rough draft and said, "You know what this needs? More rape." Like a perverted Christopher Walken asking for more cowbell. Seriously. There's a lot of rape. A lot.

  • Bri | bribooks

    This book is old-school Dean Koontz, meaning it’s at least competent, and perhaps charming . . . in a cheesy, dated sort of way.

    features a plot Koontz has rewritten ad nauseum: small town under siege by conspiracy. Include some dated technology and crass rape references and, yeah, ya got yo’ self a typical 1970s Koontzy thriller.

    Which isn’t to say this book is

    — I gave it three stars, after all. This book is moody, and it was written before Koontz allowed himself to wallow in cheese an

    This book is old-school Dean Koontz, meaning it’s at least competent, and perhaps charming . . . in a cheesy, dated sort of way.

    features a plot Koontz has rewritten ad nauseum: small town under siege by conspiracy. Include some dated technology and crass rape references and, yeah, ya got yo’ self a typical 1970s Koontzy thriller.

    Which isn’t to say this book is

    — I gave it three stars, after all. This book is moody, and it was written before Koontz allowed himself to wallow in cheese and sentiment. The characters, while mostly forgettable, aren’t offensively bad. That’s a plus, given that Koontz is prone to writing some pretty wonky leads.

    Where this novel fails most is, weirdly enough, the pacing. There’s just too build-up and too little payoff. I wanted to see more of the town; the story focuses entirely on a tight band of characters. I never got a “feel” for the town actually getting taken over via subliminal messaging. I think this one could have benefitted from being a hundred pages longer, but hey: as is,

    doesn’t overstay its welcome.

    A totally average Koontz story.

  • Checkman

    Now and again I read a Dean Koontz novel. They're good for that five or ten minute read before turning out the light at night or while killing time waiting. Not heavy reading and Koontz basically writes from a template making a change here or there.I find that I can skim through sections that are not catching my interest and not miss out on anything. I speculate that he might have a ghost writer now, but who knows? Maybe he's just a spectacular workaholic.

    Anyway

    is one of hi

    Now and again I read a Dean Koontz novel. They're good for that five or ten minute read before turning out the light at night or while killing time waiting. Not heavy reading and Koontz basically writes from a template making a change here or there.I find that I can skim through sections that are not catching my interest and not miss out on anything. I speculate that he might have a ghost writer now, but who knows? Maybe he's just a spectacular workaholic.

    Anyway

    is one of his earlier works from the mid-seventies. Though he had at least a couple dozen books under his belt by the time this one was published. Compared to the more current works by Koontz

    has a more of an edge to it. There are a couple rape sequences that are very uncomfortable to read and the two main protagonists have an active sex life that Koontz describes in detail. However it was the seventies and many authors were doing the same thing. Basically soft porn, but porn was sort of mainstream at the time and nobody can accuse Koontz of not being mainstream.

    is more of an action novel then a horror story. There are aspects of horror, but there is never that overwhelming sense of dread and doom that marks true horror (in my opinion). It's an action movie with good guys and bad guys and sequences that scream out for a full orchestra score.You can predict what is coming, but you keep watching because..............why not? It's entertaining (mostly) and goes well with popcorn. His works translate well to the screen for that very reason.

    So heading somewhere for your summer vacation and you're not sure if

    is just the thing for reading while swatting mosquitoes or trying to tan/burn? Well grab a copy of

    and six or seven other Dean Koontz novels. If you find that you are getting bored with one of the novels try a mash-up. Read a chapter of one then a chapter from another. Great fun. Enjoy your summer.

  • Kyra Dune

    I was very disappointed by this book because I usually really like Dean Koontz. Night Chills started out okay in the first couple of chapters, but after that it went downhill. To begin with, the second half of the blurb is bogus. Except for in one instance, the people in Black River don't really do anything much at all. And after those first few chapters, the biggest chunk of the book is dedicated to an in-depth explanation on how subliminal messaging works.

    Most of the time when I write a revi

    I was very disappointed by this book because I usually really like Dean Koontz. Night Chills started out okay in the first couple of chapters, but after that it went downhill. To begin with, the second half of the blurb is bogus. Except for in one instance, the people in Black River don't really do anything much at all. And after those first few chapters, the biggest chunk of the book is dedicated to an in-depth explanation on how subliminal messaging works.

    Most of the time when I write a review, I try hard to put positive comments along with negative ones no matter how much I dislike a book, but I have no positive comments for this one. I didn't care about the characters, the writing was flat, and I was completely bored.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.