The Heart of Racial Justice: How Soul Change Leads to Social Change

The Heart of Racial Justice: How Soul Change Leads to Social Change

Racial and ethnic hostility is one of the most pervasive problems the church faces. It hinders our effectiveness as one body of believers. It damages our ability to witness to and serve seekers. Why won't this problem just go away? Because it is a spiritual battle. What should our response be in a world torn apart by prejudice, hatred and fear? We must employ spiritual wea...

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Title:The Heart of Racial Justice: How Soul Change Leads to Social Change
Author:Brenda Salter Mcneil
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Heart of Racial Justice: How Soul Change Leads to Social Change Reviews

  • Soledad

    Incredibly encouraging and insightful to read Brenda and Rick's journey through racial reconciliation. Great to hear about their hits and misses, and their heart as they strive to bring racial reconciliation. I found it incredibly powerful to hear their description of 'this generation' and to reflect on how it is in the perfect spot to spur a wave of reconciliation that others have only dreamed of in the past.

  • Willie Krischke

    I get asked by pastors and church leaders on a regular basis for resources on racial reconciliation - most of them don't know how to start the conversation in their church. This is the book I'll recommend to them from now on. There are a lot of great books out there about race and ethnicity, but this is the only one I've found that's intentionally put together to a be a resource for church leaders. It's a great primer on the subject of biblical racial reconciliation. Chapter 6 alone -- which is

    I get asked by pastors and church leaders on a regular basis for resources on racial reconciliation - most of them don't know how to start the conversation in their church. This is the book I'll recommend to them from now on. There are a lot of great books out there about race and ethnicity, but this is the only one I've found that's intentionally put together to a be a resource for church leaders. It's a great primer on the subject of biblical racial reconciliation. Chapter 6 alone -- which is about false identities -- is worth the cover price.

    I read the expanded edition, and really appreciate the questions at the end of the chapter, as well as the pre-packaged small group Bible studies in Appendix 2.

  • Erin Payseur Oeth

    I am enjoying the challenge this book brings and the much needed focus on reconciliation. Over the last couple of years, I have become more convinced that God has called us as Christians, and me as an individual, to a ministry of reconciliation, not just racial reconciliation, but certainly including it. My name means peacemaker - sometimes I have taken that for avoiding conflict. I realize though there is a more important aspect to peacemaking than avoiding conflict, actually working through it

    I am enjoying the challenge this book brings and the much needed focus on reconciliation. Over the last couple of years, I have become more convinced that God has called us as Christians, and me as an individual, to a ministry of reconciliation, not just racial reconciliation, but certainly including it. My name means peacemaker - sometimes I have taken that for avoiding conflict. I realize though there is a more important aspect to peacemaking than avoiding conflict, actually working through it to resolve it. This book provides some tangible steps to cultivate that heart within us and within our communities, while focusing our attention on Jesus Christ, the One who reconciles us to God. The authors talk authentically about the challenges and the hard work of reconciliation and offer inspiration, encouragement, and guidance for those of us who are new to this work.

  • Heather

    This is a challenging book to read and process, but there's a lot of important and useful concepts and ideas. I'd like to go back and study this with a group.

  • Zac George

    I liked it. It had some good thoughts on racial justice that I hadn't really heard before. However, I'm left wondering what to do next?

    Also, I wish the authors wouldn't refer to themselves in the third person. I get it, two people wrote this book. There's just got to be a better way of writing style than that. A minor annoyance though.

  • Jack Kooyman

    One of the most insightful books I have read on racial justice and racism from a Christian perspective. Racism and the work toward racial justice, from the authors perspective, is first and foremost a spiritual issue. Therefore, in order to effectively address and improve things, we must begin with and depend on spiritual resources.

  • Liz

    is co-authored by an African-American woman and a white man. If you're familiar with InterVarsity Christian Fellowship or Christian Community Development dialogue on race, that about sums up the book. If you're not, this book talks about racial reconciliation and its components, relational healing, identity healing, and the spiritual warfare that goes on.

  • Shannon

    I believe this is an important book for Christians to read. It's very honest about the history, scope and insidious nature of racism. It garnered big points in my book for addressing a painful truth with sensitivity and love, while keeping in mind the dignity of all who may read the book.

    I only gave it 3 stars because at times the writing was redundant and seemed to circle around certain points without diving as deeply into the concepts as I would've liked. An example: "Thus, we believe that ef

    I believe this is an important book for Christians to read. It's very honest about the history, scope and insidious nature of racism. It garnered big points in my book for addressing a painful truth with sensitivity and love, while keeping in mind the dignity of all who may read the book.

    I only gave it 3 stars because at times the writing was redundant and seemed to circle around certain points without diving as deeply into the concepts as I would've liked. An example: "Thus, we believe that effective, ongoing partnerships must be committed to gathering information and to thinking critically about it in order to facilitate racial and ethnic reconciliation.

    To effectively engage in ethnic diversity and reconciliation, Christians must develop improved information gathering and critical thinking skills in order to become better educated on the causes of crosscultural conflicts"(pp. 141-142)

    This type of redundancy got tiring and I found myself skimming at times. I'd give it 3 1/2 starts if I could. I do recommend it for any Christian interested in the topic of racial reconciliation.

  • Paul Burkhart

    This is a book you would give to your really conservative friend/family member who thinks racism is pretty much non-existent, that "reverse racism" is a real thing, or that if we just believed in Jesus more then we wouldn't have racism. This is a soft-ball intro to these issues. I'd agree with most of the specifics it says, though I'm more comfortable in harder, stronger articulations of these ideas. In fact, in today's climate, I feel that a stronger rhetoric of race and resistance may actually

    This is a book you would give to your really conservative friend/family member who thinks racism is pretty much non-existent, that "reverse racism" is a real thing, or that if we just believed in Jesus more then we wouldn't have racism. This is a soft-ball intro to these issues. I'd agree with most of the specifics it says, though I'm more comfortable in harder, stronger articulations of these ideas. In fact, in today's climate, I feel that a stronger rhetoric of race and resistance may actually be needed.

  • Open Door Baltimore

    Endorsed by John Perkins, the grandfather of faith-based community development in the USA, this 2004 book is an excellent "book club" offer for folks looking for a Biblically-based discussion on racial reconciliation, especially in the context of the modern Church. The book is highly effective in balancing the importance of spiritual awakening on race issues with real-world social applications. In other words, the book has both heavenly meaning and earthly relevance. With chapters like "Is There

    Endorsed by John Perkins, the grandfather of faith-based community development in the USA, this 2004 book is an excellent "book club" offer for folks looking for a Biblically-based discussion on racial reconciliation, especially in the context of the modern Church. The book is highly effective in balancing the importance of spiritual awakening on race issues with real-world social applications. In other words, the book has both heavenly meaning and earthly relevance. With chapters like "Is There a Race Problem?" and "How Worship Builds Bridges," this is one of the best books we've encountered for pastors and book club leaders who want to dig deep on the delicate topic of race in America. Pick it up and see what you think.

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