The Curated Closet: A Simple System for Discovering Your Personal Style and Building Your Dream Wardrobe

The Curated Closet: A Simple System for Discovering Your Personal Style and Building Your Dream Wardrobe

A brilliant and inspirational roadmap for discovering and cultivating a strong sense of personal style and building the ideal wardrobe for your lifestyle.Many women don't know what their personal style is, don't have a wardrobe that actually matches their style or life, and don't know how to shop for a structured wardrobe of all pieces that can be worn easily and co...

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Title:The Curated Closet: A Simple System for Discovering Your Personal Style and Building Your Dream Wardrobe
Author:Anuschka Rees
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Curated Closet: A Simple System for Discovering Your Personal Style and Building Your Dream Wardrobe Reviews

  • Melissa

    Teenage me would have been all over this book. Taking the quizzes, making the inspiration board, the whole nine yards. Adult me doesn't have the time or energy for any of that. Honestly, I'd rather just give the author the $1,100 she states people spend each year on clothes to go out and shop for me.

    So the star rating is what teenage me would have given it. I get it, it's a fun book. Who knows, maybe when I retire (or win the lottery), I'll have enough free time that I could find all of the ste

    Teenage me would have been all over this book. Taking the quizzes, making the inspiration board, the whole nine yards. Adult me doesn't have the time or energy for any of that. Honestly, I'd rather just give the author the $1,100 she states people spend each year on clothes to go out and shop for me.

    So the star rating is what teenage me would have given it. I get it, it's a fun book. Who knows, maybe when I retire (or win the lottery), I'll have enough free time that I could find all of the steps in this book fun again.

  • Nadine

    This book covers finding your own personal style, how to detox your closet, how to build your wardrobe based on what type of clothes you need for your lifestyle, outfit formulas, how to shop and make the most of your budget, and how to chose items with the correct fit and quality.

    My favorite section covered how to create a mood board and what to do with the mood board. I always see outfits on pinterest and blogs that I love but I never really thought what specifically about these loo

    This book covers finding your own personal style, how to detox your closet, how to build your wardrobe based on what type of clothes you need for your lifestyle, outfit formulas, how to shop and make the most of your budget, and how to chose items with the correct fit and quality.

    My favorite section covered how to create a mood board and what to do with the mood board. I always see outfits on pinterest and blogs that I love but I never really thought what specifically about these looks that I like. If you look at my board as a whole, I start to see themes with either color palettes or the fit of something. I realized that I should be writing a list down of items that I want to try on and see how they work for me.

    One thing I wish this book did offer was maybe more pictures. Though, I can understand why that would have been hard to do. I think this book would be a great addition for the fashionista in your life….or the person who could use some help in the wardrobe department! It certainly has given me great advice for how to get my wardrobe perfect after baby!

  • Pam

    It took renewing this book from Overdrive 4 times to finish it because it comes with “homework” assignments to help you discover your personal style (e.g., take a photo of your outfit for 2 weeks and write down how you felt when you wore it, what you liked about it, didn’t like, etc.). The unique thing is that this book isn’t about discovering a style (e.g., classic, bohemian), but YOUR OWN STYLE. I discovered that my own style is a weird hybrid, but now I know what colors and silhouettes I am d

    It took renewing this book from Overdrive 4 times to finish it because it comes with “homework” assignments to help you discover your personal style (e.g., take a photo of your outfit for 2 weeks and write down how you felt when you wore it, what you liked about it, didn’t like, etc.). The unique thing is that this book isn’t about discovering a style (e.g., classic, bohemian), but YOUR OWN STYLE. I discovered that my own style is a weird hybrid, but now I know what colors and silhouettes I am drawn to and flatter me. I know what needs to be purged from my closet and what things I need to slowly add over time. This book advocates quality over quantity (and teaches you how to recognize quality) and touches on the psychology of shopping and over-buying to fill emotional needs.

  • Anna

    ‘The Curated Closet’ is based on a style blog called Into Mind which I've enjoyed reading. The author is preaching to the choir with me, as I already have quite an analytical approach to my wardrobe. (For example, when I got a job after finishing my PhD, I sketched out a workwear concept and did a gap analysis to see whether I could achieve it without buying more clothes.) I noticed that the book didn’t discuss sustainability to the same extent as the blog; possibly Rees is saving that for a seq

    ‘The Curated Closet’ is based on a style blog called Into Mind which I've enjoyed reading. The author is preaching to the choir with me, as I already have quite an analytical approach to my wardrobe. (For example, when I got a job after finishing my PhD, I sketched out a workwear concept and did a gap analysis to see whether I could achieve it without buying more clothes.) I noticed that the book didn’t discuss sustainability to the same extent as the blog; possibly Rees is saving that for a sequel. Nonetheless, the ethos being promoted is resolutely anti-fast fashion, which I appreciate very much. Rees’ ‘curated closet’ approach involves less shopping and thinking much more carefully about what you buy. She explains how to arrive at your personal style concept and then apply it to the practicalities of life. This is all very clearly explained in a non-patronising manner. (My style concept has been described by a friend as ‘battle librarian’. I would add to that ‘trying to avoid hypothermia’, as my wardrobe includes no shorts or sandals whatsoever but lots of tweed, wool jumpers, and merino base layers.)

    I read the vast majority of this book just before going to sleep and would definitely not recommend this. If you have a remotely analytical brain and/or fondness for thinking about clothes, you will find yourself mentally rifling through your wardrobe and contemplating what is under- and over-represented within. Enjoyable as this was, it kept me awake for much longer than I wanted to be. I will probably work through the ‘curated closet’ approach properly at the weekend, to refine my personal style and improve my wardrobe. I particularly liked Rees’ ideas regarding capsule wardrobes for particular purposes, albeit with potential for overlap. I broadly divide my clothes into Work (smarter), Leisure (casual), and Dressing Up Box (formal & fancy). I would also add that developing a firm idea of your personal style and which clothing items your wardrobe is lacking makes charity & second hand shopping vastly easier. My approach to efficient charity shopping, which has served me well, involves locating the section for my size, then visually sifting by colour, fabric, and shape. If you know your clothing preferences well (eg dark jewel tones, natural fibres, and fitted at the waist, in my case) it’s much quicker to zero in on bargains. Charity shops are both an inexpensive and ethical way to buy clothes. Just today I found a lovely wool and cashmere jumper-dress for £4.50!

    In conclusion, as ‘develop your personal style’ books go, this is a very good one. Notably, it advises you to wear what you actually like and ignore ubiquitous rules about ‘flattering your figure’ (ie looking taller and thinner). Perhaps the process might seem a bit detailed and time-consuming for some, however this is totally my idea of fun.

  • Life is Novel

    I appreciate that the message is to encourage confidence to express your personal style, but I'm a bit old for that message. I think this would be an excellent choice for a younger reader - maybe a twentysomething who is still defining herself and her style (and has the time/interest in style quizzes). The best guide I've read in years was Marie Kondo... More appropriate for my phase of life.

    The models' outfits were pretty but followed one aesthetic. Surprised me that a book about de

    I appreciate that the message is to encourage confidence to express your personal style, but I'm a bit old for that message. I think this would be an excellent choice for a younger reader - maybe a twentysomething who is still defining herself and her style (and has the time/interest in style quizzes). The best guide I've read in years was Marie Kondo... More appropriate for my phase of life.

    The models' outfits were pretty but followed one aesthetic. Surprised me that a book about defining your unique style should have such a homogenous approach. I may have found it more interesting if the looks had been more diverse or the models had been from more age groups or body types.

    I gave it three stars because it is a thorough, conversational and well-done book for its purpose; I'm just not in the "curated closet" space right now.

  • Lisa Lewis

    I am something of a fashion disaster, so when this book was recommended to me by my very stylish daughter, I figured I had better read it.

    In general, Rees takes fashion far more seriously than I ever will, but the process she offers in this book was still of value even for me. The focus of the book is about figuring out what your own style is, in terms of the things that you like, and then making sure that you align your wardrobe with your own tastes. And if you don't think you have your own st

    I am something of a fashion disaster, so when this book was recommended to me by my very stylish daughter, I figured I had better read it.

    In general, Rees takes fashion far more seriously than I ever will, but the process she offers in this book was still of value even for me. The focus of the book is about figuring out what your own style is, in terms of the things that you like, and then making sure that you align your wardrobe with your own tastes. And if you don't think you have your own style, several of the exercises in the book are designed to help you learn what your style is by examining your own outfits and identifying what you like about them and what you don't, and looking for fashion inspiration from others in magazines or online.

    I didn't carry out all of her suggestions, but I did get as far as coming up with a clear picture of what I like and why, and "detoxing" my closet. I was pleased that this book did not make me feel worse about my fashion sense or wardrobe, but instead made me feel that I needed to understand my own taste better and then be more true to myself. Not a bad conclusion.

  • Kelsey

    This book would have been great for me about 2 years ago, when I was completely overhauling my closet. However, now that I have a set style, it wasn't really useful. It had pretty pictures though, and there were some activities in there that would be fun to try, like styling a "basic" outfit (think white t shirt and jeans) 6 different ways!

    While this

    helpful for building your dream wardrobe, I do think that Rees takes it a little bit too seriously, at least to me. Fashion, I think,

    This book would have been great for me about 2 years ago, when I was completely overhauling my closet. However, now that I have a set style, it wasn't really useful. It had pretty pictures though, and there were some activities in there that would be fun to try, like styling a "basic" outfit (think white t shirt and jeans) 6 different ways!

    While this

    helpful for building your dream wardrobe, I do think that Rees takes it a little bit too seriously, at least to me. Fashion, I think, is fun, and is meant to fun. It's creative and imaginative, and you can wear whatever you want nowadays, so why put rules on it? I found the curating part to be a little too much, and skimmed a lot of those parts.

    For example, though of course it's not a die hard rule, and she acknowledges that, I found some tips to be too boxed in. There's a section in there where she wants us to create a color palette for our wardrobe, of three main colors and four accent colors (or something along those lines). I mean, I guess that could help some people curate their wardrobe, but to me, I thought it was too restrictive. I wear mostly neutrals, so black, grey, navy, brown, and military green are very prevalent in my closet, but I like wearing color too! Reds, pinks, pastels, whites, etc. I'm certainly not going to limit colors in my wardrobe to "curate" it.

    She also definitely focused on quality over quantity, and while I agree that I'd rather buy something made better than, say, a Walmart t shirt, it's just not realistic for some. Some people don't have the budget to spend $200 on a "solid investment" coat. For people like me, who definitely weren't poor, but lived with parents that lived paycheck to paycheck after the recession, I'll never, ever, spend $150 on a pair of Levi's, just because it's good quality. Do I have the money to spend? Absolutely. Is it a worthwhile purchase to me? Absolutely not. My JCPenney jeans that I get for $30 work just fine, thank you!

    For some though, of course, it's totally different. If you live in the fashion world like her, where all eyes are on you and what you're wearing, or make hundreds of thousands of dollars, and can make investments like that and can afford tailoring on everything, then yeah. Definitely buy those $550 Gucci sunglasses if you want! But I don't think those kind of people are reading this book. I think mostly, it's people like me, who are interested in fashion, but will never have or don't want a career in it, and just want a few tips on how to create your own wardrobe.

    Unfortunately, that's what most of the book spends time on, though. Creating a personal wardrobe. That's fine, but the "discovering your personal style" part kind of takes a back seat. She has good tips on how to do so, like make a board of what you like on other people and yourself, the way those people style certain things, etc, but I'd say it's maybe about 30% of the book.

    Rees definitely takes the minimalist approach to fashion, which, once again, is fine! However, I like the complete opposite approach. Whereas she only wants you to buy something if it fits in with your completely written down and thought out wardrobe list, I say, if you like it, and it makes you feel good, then buy it! Honestly, who cares? I mean, don't send yourself into debt over a purchase (or six), but just because it doesn't completely, 100% fit in with your cultivated wardrobe doesn't mean you shouldn't buy it.

    This book was published in 2016, and I do believe that's when minimalism started to come into play in the fashion world. All of a sudden, it was cool to only have enough pieces for 20 or so outfits, and to have everything fit on one rack in a sunlit room, where you displayed your 5 pairs of shoes in front of your clothes, and your sunhat hung off on the left side of your wardrobe rack. Of course, that aesthetic, and that minimalist approach to fashion, is great for some. However, it doesn't work for me, so I didn't find this book to be that useful.

    (Also, I will just never get the concept of a capsule wardrobe. It's so...

    .)

  • Sharyn Yenzer

    If you are under 30, wear a size 6 and have lots of money, then this is a good book for you.

  • A M

    Found this book from an online recommendation and I guess there's no accounting for taste. Overly complicated exercises. I never followed the author's fashion blog, so I can't compare the two. How about this: wear what you like, make sure it fits and isn't worn out (try on everything in your closet), buy the best quality you can afford to fill in the gaps going forward and break your dependence on fast, cheap fashion. I've been around the block with reading fashion magazines/books and watching T

    Found this book from an online recommendation and I guess there's no accounting for taste. Overly complicated exercises. I never followed the author's fashion blog, so I can't compare the two. How about this: wear what you like, make sure it fits and isn't worn out (try on everything in your closet), buy the best quality you can afford to fill in the gaps going forward and break your dependence on fast, cheap fashion. I've been around the block with reading fashion magazines/books and watching TV shows and just general people watching on and off through the years, admiring the style of real life and fictional characters (shoutout to Denise Huxtable being one of my early fictional characters whose closet I wanted to raid), and I don't think there's any new information here. Book has very involved activities that I don't see how anyone older than their mid-20s (assuming they don't already have young children) is going to have time to do. The one thing I liked was the fashion profile of the model (menswear-inspired) and articulating how she puts together her style, but that was just one or two pages. I wish there had been more of those kinds of profiles.

  • Anne White

    "Curated" is to 2016 what "artisanal" was a few years ago. It means approximately the same thing, and that thing isn't necessarily a bad thing, it's just an overused thing. The positive side of "curated" is that it implies something carefully chosen, involving individualized perception and taste; and it also assumes some kind of a "less is more" approach. All of this applies to the advice given in The Curated Closet and on the blog that preceded it, Into Mind. It is a non-multiple-choice way of

    "Curated" is to 2016 what "artisanal" was a few years ago. It means approximately the same thing, and that thing isn't necessarily a bad thing, it's just an overused thing. The positive side of "curated" is that it implies something carefully chosen, involving individualized perception and taste; and it also assumes some kind of a "less is more" approach. All of this applies to the advice given in The Curated Closet and on the blog that preceded it, Into Mind. It is a non-multiple-choice way of clothing yourself smarter and better. You don't have to fit into any particular box of physique, season, or blood type, says the book; you can combine elements of this and that, create a style that is your very own.

    Unfortunately, assuming that we all have enough fashion sense, say to be able to discern "menswear-inspired French chic" from "Grace Kelly goes to college," is where a book like this leaves some of us in the dust. Some of us don't know our Boho colours from our "contemporary mod," or who Carrie Bradshaw was or what she dressed like (I had to look that up). The open-ended advice of "do what's right for you" can be either empowering or just frustrating. It doesn't matter whether we're told to cut up fashion magazines (which many of us don't have around the house, other than freebie mags from Walmart); or to look at Pinterest for inspiration: the problem, for the average person who doesn't normally spend time perusing these things, is that we still don't know what we're looking for or at.

    But if you take this book slowly, in the right order, and don't let it overwhelm you, there is more help included than may first appear. Simply making a list of things you like can get you halfway there, whether you can come up with a name-in-quotation-marks for it or not. If you're happy with the majority of what's in your closet, and it functions well in your current lifestyle, then you probably have an idea of what you need to buy next or what small changes you want to make. I appreciate Rees' advice to to buy new clothes slowly, both for budget reasons and because it's easy to overdo any sudden change.

    If you're confused by the personalized colour-palette approach, as Rees points out, that's.only one way of grouping clothes, and she offers at least two other methods that might work better for you. If you can't tell your key pieces from your statements (another irritating word that should disappear soon) or your basics, that's still okay; you might be better off writing down what your usual pattern, uniform, or formula for an outfit is. Do you usually wear jeans, t-shirts, and cardigans? That's fine: just make sure you have enough of everything to get you through to the next laundry day. Obviously the point of a curated wardrobe, for Rees, is not to hang it in a museum but to let it be worn and enjoyed.

    If you have a great sense of your personal style, you probably know most of what Rees has to say already. But if you find shopping frustrating, and kind of wish you could get yourself a little more together, this book might be what you need.

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