Humble Roots: How Humility Grounds and Nourishes Your Soul

Humble Roots: How Humility Grounds and Nourishes Your Soul

Feeling worn thin? Come find rest.The Blue Ridge Parkway meanders through miles of rolling Virginia mountains. It's a route made famous by natural beauty and the simple rhythms of rural life.And it's in this setting that Hannah Anderson began her exploration of what it means to pursue a life of peace and humility. Fighting back her own sense of rest...

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Title:Humble Roots: How Humility Grounds and Nourishes Your Soul
Author:Hannah Anderson
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Edition Language:English

Humble Roots: How Humility Grounds and Nourishes Your Soul Reviews

  • Debbie

    "Humble Roots" explored how we can find rest for our souls through a humble heart--through acknowledging our dependence on God. The basic idea is that God is God and we're not. She looked at a number of ways we might try to be god and not realize it. Our culture teaches and even glorifies some things that are counter to the understanding that we're not God. She also looked at how humility can be shown in how you care for your body and emotions, treat knowledge, resources, and desires, respond to

    "Humble Roots" explored how we can find rest for our souls through a humble heart--through acknowledging our dependence on God. The basic idea is that God is God and we're not. She looked at a number of ways we might try to be god and not realize it. Our culture teaches and even glorifies some things that are counter to the understanding that we're not God. She also looked at how humility can be shown in how you care for your body and emotions, treat knowledge, resources, and desires, respond to the brokenness of this world, and face suffering and death.

    The author focused on the Bible for answers and provided insights into the verses and our culture. She used gardening analogies to help illustrate certain points. I never felt condemned (like any good Christian ought to have this down), just "Arg, she's right! How have I been missing that?" I have felt more rested and less worried after reading this book. I'd highly recommend this book to any Christian.

    I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  • Laura

    Do you know that feeling you get when you finally get a diagnosis for something that's been bothering you? When you finally can put a name to the symptoms, can finally see that so many of your most persistent problems have one common cause? I didn't expect this book to diagnose me, but it has. I'm so grateful that Hannah Anderson has done the hard and slow work of growing in wisdom while I get to just gather and enjoy the fruits of her labors through this book.

    The book begins with Ha

    Do you know that feeling you get when you finally get a diagnosis for something that's been bothering you? When you finally can put a name to the symptoms, can finally see that so many of your most persistent problems have one common cause? I didn't expect this book to diagnose me, but it has. I'm so grateful that Hannah Anderson has done the hard and slow work of growing in wisdom while I get to just gather and enjoy the fruits of her labors through this book.

    The book begins with Hannah Anderson’s own honest question: How can I be unhappy and constantly stressed with a very normal life?

    As she opened scripture in search of God’s rest, Anderson began to recognize that rest must come from Christ-like humility. Pride gives us a false and inflated estimation of our own importance in the world that leads to stress, self-consciousness and a frantic schedule. Humility reminds us to pause and ponder: “What do I have that I have not received?” (1 Cor. 4:7). This humility is not a kind of accessory we add on to our list of other nice attributes. No, Anderson is talking about the kind of humility that comes from recognizing that you are a creature, little more than “articulated earth” (to borrow a phrase from Malcolm Guite’s poetry).

    Or as Anderson describes it: “Suddenly we see where we fit in the narrative: facedown in the dust. We are not called to embody Jesus ourselves; He has already been incarnated and is still even now! No, we are not called to be Jesus; we are called to fall at His feet and worship Him…and it is through this worship, through recognizing His rightful place, that we are finally humbled.”

    Once we realize “that we have nothing that we have not received” suddenly we are freed to be grateful for the particular talents God has granted us and even to acknowledge the unique dreams God has placed in our hearts. Our gratitude is rooted not in having more than others, but in “having anything at all.”

    I thought I knew most of what there was to know about humility and pride, but I was surprised in each chapter to discover a new way that the weeds of pride can manifest themselves and choke out joy and thankfulness. By the end of the book, I was marveling in the gift of humility—how it opens me up to the possibility that I might not know everything so that I can be more concerned with learning the answers than having the answers. It freed me to be grateful for what I possess, even the very particular and secret dreams of my own heart, because suddenly I saw them as resources and gifts given to me to “ ‘seed’ the world with other healing plants.”

    If Anderson’s first book

    was about helping readers find their identity, this book continues the conversation by helping readers understand that “everything (in their lives) is a gift and everything has purpose.” I knew from her first book that Hannah Anderson was a thoughtful reader of scripture, of poetry, and of the world, but even I was surprised by the beauty of her writing. Her imagination is deeply rooted in scripture, and this gives her eyes to see the symbolic potential in everything around her, from store-bought tomatoes to wild blackberries (which she uses to illustrate how we can “forage for the sweetness that God has promised”). Anderson plucks illustrations from her rural Appalachian life and uses them to convey just how powerful it can be to rediscover our own humble roots. Each chapter could stand alone as an elegant essay that weaves keen observations of rural life with the wisdom of scripture.

    For some reason, and this could just be my own biases showing through, I was surprised to find nary a mention of sabbath. To my way of thinking, sabbath is a crucial element to acknowledging and living within our creaturely limits. It reminds us that we can not and ought not to depend solely on our own efforts. I guess she did address this in talking about sleep and death, but it seemed like a missing piece of the puzzle for me.

    It’s a pity this book might get shelved under some heading like “Women’s Spirituality” because there isn’t a page in this book that doesn’t apply as much to men as it does to women. I hope her work transcends any such labels and finds the readership it deserves.

  • Christine Hoover

    Fabulous book. Convicting, helpful, and beautifully written.

  • Lindsey Goetz

    A beautiful, hopeful, deeply important book. I'll admit, I was hesitant to read this book for fear of finding out just how prideful I am. Hannah Anderson's words help us to see the pride in our lives, how that pride makes us anxious, and how death to self and life in Christ produce the fruit of humility in our lives. This book is so good precisely because she doesn't try to teach us to be humble, but instead points us to Jesus, who humbled himself unto death. The Holy Spirit used this book to co

    A beautiful, hopeful, deeply important book. I'll admit, I was hesitant to read this book for fear of finding out just how prideful I am. Hannah Anderson's words help us to see the pride in our lives, how that pride makes us anxious, and how death to self and life in Christ produce the fruit of humility in our lives. This book is so good precisely because she doesn't try to teach us to be humble, but instead points us to Jesus, who humbled himself unto death. The Holy Spirit used this book to comfort me, to convict me, to pull me out of apathy and indifference, and to give meaning to a very difficult season. Highly recommend.

  • Dillon

    I love this book. Well-written, humbling, grounding. The agricultural metaphors gave the book a nice flavor, too. And so many good quotes that are helpful for devotional reflection. A few gems:

    "Before we can be grafted onto Him, we must be stripped of our decomposing roots, our self-sufficiency and ego. We must give up the pretense that we can root ourselves. We must reject the pride that believes in humility as a concept but refuses to actually be humbled before God."

    "Most of us . . . still f

    I love this book. Well-written, humbling, grounding. The agricultural metaphors gave the book a nice flavor, too. And so many good quotes that are helpful for devotional reflection. A few gems:

    "Before we can be grafted onto Him, we must be stripped of our decomposing roots, our self-sufficiency and ego. We must give up the pretense that we can root ourselves. We must reject the pride that believes in humility as a concept but refuses to actually be humbled before God."

    "Most of us . . . still find ways to signal our superiority. We complain about the struggle to be understood by others (superiority of uniqueness). We complain about keeping our new white leather couch clean with young children (superiority of affluence). We complain about how lonely it is to be a leader in ministry (superiority of influence). But as unfounded as our stress may be, we still feel it. In that moment, our complaint feels entirely valid. And it feels valid because we actually believe ourselves worthy of a different experience. We fail to recognize how much we already enjoy because we assume we deserve it or because we’ve earned it."

    "It is important to understand the connection between pride and our sinful actions. The danger for many of us is that we evaluate the state of our hearts based on whether we are intentionally sinning. The problem, of course, is that pride literally blinds us to the state of our own hearts; we will feel entirely justified in our choices. When this happens, we can convince ourselves that we are humble people, despite sin in our lives."

    "A fool’s confidence in her own perspective is also why she doesn’t receive instruction—from God or other people. She doesn’t receive instruction because she doesn’t believe she needs it. She’s not intentionally rejecting insight. She’s not intentionally embracing ignorance. She just thinks she’s fine. She’s satisfied with her own mind."

    "Humility teaches us to forgo prepackaged, cellophane wrapped, artificially ripened answers to allow faith to develop naturally. In other words, humility teaches us to be less concerned with knowing the answers and more concerned with learning the answers."

    I'd say it's well worth reading the whole thing!

  • Jillian Vincent

    The most life altering book I’ve read this year. Recommend to all. Wisdom upon wisdom upon wisdom. I love her metaphors, whimsical, real, and sometimes heartbreaking. This will hit you to the core. Quoted some of my recent favorites, including Brene Brown and Wendell Berry.

  • Lindsay

    A look at the beautiful trait of humility & how learning Christ's gentle and humble spirit can be the solution for our struggles with fear, identity, and more. I found a few little nuggets sprinkled throughout, but struggled with all the gardening analogies that I didn't feel tied in all that well, but it may just be because I am not a gardener. Ideal for the garden/plant lover who wants to grow in humility. ;)

  • Scott

    Very good book on humility. As a gardener I personally loved the agricultural references throughout. I also enjoyed the folksy charm of small town life that ripples below the surface all the while addressing the heart issues of pride that infect my soul. I suspect I’ll re-read this one again in the future.

  • Kristin Kowalk

    3.5* I liked this book enough to buy it so I could mark especially helpful passages. But some structural quirks and illustration choices made me give it a lower rating.

  • Sarah Mackintosh

    More like 2.5 stars. I like what the author had to say, even strongly agreed with her on a lot of points. I did not love this book. There were far too many quotations and references to other works. I also felt like the theme of plants was stretched at times, and I wondered if I was reading a gardening book and how it related to what spiritual item the chapter was addressing (and what that spiritual item even was).

    Rambling sums it up.

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