Your Inner Critic Is a Big Jerk: And Other Truths About Being Creative

Your Inner Critic Is a Big Jerk: And Other Truths About Being Creative

This book is duct tape for the mouth of every artist's inner critic. Silencing that stifling voice once and for all, this salve for creatives introduces ten truths they must face in order to defeat self-doubt. Each encouraging chapter deconstructs a pivotal moment on the path to success—fear of the blank page, the dangers of jealousy, sharing work with others—and explains...

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Title:Your Inner Critic Is a Big Jerk: And Other Truths About Being Creative
Author:Danielle Krysa
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Your Inner Critic Is a Big Jerk: And Other Truths About Being Creative Reviews

  • Elyza

    This book was so inspiring!!! The whole time I was reading it I kept thinking about different people I wanted to give it to, so they could be inspired too! However I will be keeping this copy because I see myself picking it back up in the future! 😉 Also the book is filled with Martha Rich's paintings and I love her artwork!!!!!

  • Ingrid

    I really needed to read this right now, and I feel a bit emotional now.

  • Jeni

    This book is like having a visit from my old art friend from college. This book is honest, relatable and funny. Danielle Kyrsa shares a personal experience that nearly stopped her from ever making art again but now uses the story to share how she healed and grew into the artist and writer she is today. She exposes the negative voice inside our heads that blocks and hinders our creative thinking and creating. She warns artist, writers, chefs, musicians, dancers, anyone who makes things that the “

    This book is like having a visit from my old art friend from college. This book is honest, relatable and funny. Danielle Kyrsa shares a personal experience that nearly stopped her from ever making art again but now uses the story to share how she healed and grew into the artist and writer she is today. She exposes the negative voice inside our heads that blocks and hinders our creative thinking and creating. She warns artist, writers, chefs, musicians, dancers, anyone who makes things that the “Inner Critic” does not have the power we give it. She gives suggestions like, make the ugliest thing you can come up with, on purpose, get in to a daily practice to make and do not allow yourself (or your Inner Critic) to talk you out of it, and my favorite one is to have art parties. Art parties are for a very selective group of friends that you trust to tell you the truth. We need to hear truth, louder than our Inner Critic. This quirky book is playful and has pictures in it. She reminds us to also be playful and childlike when making. Overall, I enjoyed reading it and I think my students would as well.

  • Taryn

    A succinct guide to owning your creativity and overcoming negative thoughts. The ten chapters focus on a variety of common creative hurdles: finding inspiration, conquering self-doubt, ending the excuses, handling jealousy, dealing with critics, beginning again after failure, building a support system, and beating creative block. It's filled with tips, anecdotes from professionals, exercises to spark your creativity, inspiring quotes, and whimsical illustrations.

    “Don’t

    A succinct guide to owning your creativity and overcoming negative thoughts. The ten chapters focus on a variety of common creative hurdles: finding inspiration, conquering self-doubt, ending the excuses, handling jealousy, dealing with critics, beginning again after failure, building a support system, and beating creative block. It's filled with tips, anecdotes from professionals, exercises to spark your creativity, inspiring quotes, and whimsical illustrations.

    A few points are reiterated throughout the book:

    Much of the advice relates to collage art and painting, but Danielle Krysa interviews people from a variety of fields, including acting and writing. Artists in any specialty will be able to relate to the stories within and mold the advice to their own experience. My two creative pursuits (graphic design and quilting) couldn't be more different in practice, but the mind game is 100% the same. One of my favorite chapters was "Blank Paper Can Be Blinding." Cutting into a whole piece of fabric or staring at a blank screen can be paralyzing. The endless possibilities are overwhelming! Krysa includes ten ideas for relieving the pressure and conquering a blank page.

    My biggest creative roadblock is usually getting started, so the

    were especially helpful. Krysa encourages you to form daily habits, like a photo-a-day project. A daily project makes creation part of your everyday life, so that you're always present enough to see the inspiration all around you. Even if these exercises have nothing to do with your primary goal, it might be just what you need to jump-start your creativity. Sometimes it's tough to get inspired to work on your big project. That's not an excuse to do nothing! Krysa suggests

    by doing some creative housekeeping. For me, that might be cutting fabric for a quilt or learning a new Photoshop technique. These are tasks that have helped me overcome creative block in the past, but I haven't considered making them part of my routine.

    Krysa has a 

    Criticism isn't always helpful. It can be cruel or simply a matter of opinion. There are tips for not taking that type of criticism to heart. However, sometimes we can get so close to our art that we can lose all objectivity. Constructive criticism can help take a project to the next level or direct you towards a better path. It may take a bit of translation to read behind the lines and find the helpful advice, but it's a worthwhile exercise. There's also advice for

     This book forced me to rethink my bad habit of pointing out the flaws in my projects. Krysa is right; it really does become like a

    Being able to critique your own work is an important part of the process, but there's no reason to point out your findings to everyone!

    I've heard many of the tips before, but it's helpful to be reminded. I wouldn't read it from cover-to-cover again, but it's

    . I can flip to the relevant section for a quick kick in the right direction. An

    goes a long way to getting be back on track when I’m feeling overwhelmed or dejected.

     would be a

    or someone who is on the cusp of something great. It's a

    --I read it in two hours while waiting for jury duty to start--but it's filled with

    For more tips on making the most of your creative life, you may enjoy 

    .

  • Beth Cato

    is a blunt yet pleasant self-help book for anyone in the creative arts. Krysa writes as someone who has personally experienced artistic blocks--in fact, giving up on art entirely due to a professor's harsh criticism--and the whole book has a vibe of a friend taking your hand to talk sense into you.

    The book itself is well-made and would work well on a coffee table. It's hardcover, with a front cover that is enough by itself to make a person smile. The design inside is

    is a blunt yet pleasant self-help book for anyone in the creative arts. Krysa writes as someone who has personally experienced artistic blocks--in fact, giving up on art entirely due to a professor's harsh criticism--and the whole book has a vibe of a friend taking your hand to talk sense into you.

    The book itself is well-made and would work well on a coffee table. It's hardcover, with a front cover that is enough by itself to make a person smile. The design inside is, again, friendly. Pages are not filled with text and there are frequent, colorful illustrations. It's a fast read because there do tend to just be a couple paragraphs to a page--the blank space is soothing, but the author also encourages people to use the space to make notes. There are a few areas where there are activities or questions, but it's not hardcore in that way.

    As an author with a loud inner critic, I found the book encouraging without being obnoxious as some books like this are. I'd consider getting this for author friends who were struggling through Imposter Syndrome and other similar afflictions.

  • Lorilin

    This book is basically a shorter, breezier version of Elizabeth Gilbert's

    --with some quirky illustrations thrown in. In other words, it's wonderful.

    In ten chapters, author Danielle Krysa outlines ten ways you can silence your inner critic and more freely let your creative light shine. Some of her tips are more inspirational than concrete, but I found all of them relevant and useful in some way. Most of them center on the importance of acknowledging your identity as

    This book is basically a shorter, breezier version of Elizabeth Gilbert's

    --with some quirky illustrations thrown in. In other words, it's wonderful.

    In ten chapters, author Danielle Krysa outlines ten ways you can silence your inner critic and more freely let your creative light shine. Some of her tips are more inspirational than concrete, but I found all of them relevant and useful in some way. Most of them center on the importance of acknowledging your identity as an artist and committing to creating every day.

    Krysa also includes stories and interviews with other artists who have struggled with shaky self-confidence resulting from harsh criticism (both public and personal). There are relevant quotes sprinkled throughout, too, that offer some comfort, understanding, and reassurance to the creative-but-discouraged soul.

    is a quick read but a good one. If you liked

    , you should enjoy this one, too.

    See more of my reviews at

    .

  • britt_brooke

    “Labels are for canned peaches, not humans.”

    I snagged this #Audible deal a few days ago on a $2 whim. I’m really happy I did! It’s a short (just under 3 hours), but feel-good type of self help-ish book for creative folks. I’ve always felt myself as pretty creative and crafty, but not necessarily as an artist. This book provides some good advice and perspective. It hit me at a good time.

  • Heidi The Reader

    A quirky little book about how to inspire your own creativity and how to use your inner negative voice to its best advantage. Martha Rich's art elevates what is actually rather simple text, but, on a more positive note, it is a quick read for those who may be short on time.

    I couldn't help but draw similarities between this book and

    , which I read last week.

    deals with the sensitive parts of the creative process and brea

    A quirky little book about how to inspire your own creativity and how to use your inner negative voice to its best advantage. Martha Rich's art elevates what is actually rather simple text, but, on a more positive note, it is a quick read for those who may be short on time.

    I couldn't help but draw similarities between this book and

    , which I read last week.

    deals with the sensitive parts of the creative process and breaking through your fears about how your art will be received.

    is more about why you need to create the art that only you can create and how a bunch of different artists have managed to do just that. But, if you're looking to jump start your creativity this year, pick up both of these because they actually complement each other fairly well.

    One of my take-aways from

    is that it is never too late to start doing what you do:

    pg 20 And Krysa goes on to list such luminaries as van Gogh, Money, and Julia Child. Can you believe that!

    Even if you didn't go to school to learn whatever art you feel compelled to create, you are still an artist. I've been pricked by that negative inner whisper once or twice and it was cathartic to learn that I'm not alone in that struggle and to finally put it to rest:

    pg 45

    Some further reading:

    or

  • Lou

    I enjoyed reading this book, however it basically said all the things I already knew (typical for an advice book). The illustrations were super cute. I might be trying to be a bit more creative now 😊

  • Donna Merritt

    I expected more after loving the title. A beginning artist might find some helpful tips. Other than that . . .

    1. While the author tries to include all creative people, it's geared toward artists.

    2. The overuse and misuse of the comma irritated the OCD editor in me.

    3. Mark Twain suggested substituting the word "damn" whenever you're inclined to write "very." He said your editor will strike it out and your writing will be just as it should be. Krysa might like t

    I expected more after loving the title. A beginning artist might find some helpful tips. Other than that . . .

    1. While the author tries to include all creative people, it's geared toward artists.

    2. The overuse and misuse of the comma irritated the OCD editor in me.

    3. Mark Twain suggested substituting the word "damn" whenever you're inclined to write "very." He said your editor will strike it out and your writing will be just as it should be. Krysa might like to try this with a few different words, but with "very" in particular. If the word you choose isn't strong enough unless you tack "very" or something similar in front of it, you need a different word. Even when my children were young, they learned to count how many times they'd used a word in a story or essay and edit it.

    4. Krysa's whole premise is that she is an artist because she learned to ignore her inner critic. Why did someone else illustrate this book?

    5. The book looks organized at first glance, but repeats information and jumps around. Feels like some of the writing was rushed just to get something on paper.

    6. More originality and fewer cliches would have been nice.

    7. Sticking with a central metaphor would have been nice also.

    8. Some of the inspirational quotes are good, but easy enough to find with a quick Internet search. Instead of grouping a bunch together in chapter eight, it would have worked to lead each chapter with a relevant quote. Sometimes she did that, sometimes not. Consistency is a helpful organizational tool.

    9. When referring back to a chapter, the chapter number is all we need. (Not sure why she kept announcing the titles of chapters.)

    10. This book would have worked better streamlined as an online essay with a tighter focus.

    Now, given all that, I'm glad Krysa says she's learned to ignore not only her inner critic, but some outside ones. I'm not out to hurt her feelings. However, if she writes another book, I hope she will be open to the advice above.

    And to show I'm not a nitpicking grump of an old writer, I will end with a point she made that I like. When asking adults if they are artists, she is often met with a blank look or resistance. When asking children, however:

    Me (Krysa): "Are you an artist?"

    Kid: "Yes."

    Some things are simple. Let's learn to accept our creativity.

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