Ikigai: Los secretos de Japón para una vida larga y feliz

Ikigai: Los secretos de Japón para una vida larga y feliz

“Only staying active will make you want to live a hundred years.” —Japanese proverb According to the Japanese, everyone has an ikigai—a reason for living. And according to the residents of the Japanese village with the world’s longest-living people, finding it is the key to a happier and longer life. Having a strong sense of ikigai—the place where passion, mission, vocatio...

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Title:Ikigai: Los secretos de Japón para una vida larga y feliz
Author:Hector Garcia Puigcerver
Rating:
Edition Language:Spanish

Ikigai: Los secretos de Japón para una vida larga y feliz Reviews

  • Nadia King

    I literally inhaled this book. Ikigai is a beautiful book about Japanese culture and discusses the secret to a long and happy life. If you're interested in Japanese culture and self-development this gorgeous book is for you. Just reading this had a calm and centering effect on me. "Happiness is always determined by your heart." 💙

  • Patrick Sherriff

    I just got my Japanese pension book in the mail today, but won't be able to use it for a good 20 years yet, so staying alive for a long time suddenly just became a bit more real for me: to get all my pension payments back I'll need to be around for a good 30 more years at least. And the advice presented here seems irrefutable: eat more fruit and veg; drink less alcohol; do a bit of exercise everyday; don't sweat the small stuff; don't sweat the big stuff; hang out with your loved ones everyday;

    I just got my Japanese pension book in the mail today, but won't be able to use it for a good 20 years yet, so staying alive for a long time suddenly just became a bit more real for me: to get all my pension payments back I'll need to be around for a good 30 more years at least. And the advice presented here seems irrefutable: eat more fruit and veg; drink less alcohol; do a bit of exercise everyday; don't sweat the small stuff; don't sweat the big stuff; hang out with your loved ones everyday; and find a pursuit, however large or small, that gives meaning to your life. Stay active doing that. And push yourself doing it, but just a little. Oh, and get plenty but not too much sleep, and don't eat too much. Is it that simple and obvious to live to a ripe old age? Probably. Sounds reasonable to me, but you could hardly call this book a thorough analysis of why the Japanese live such a long and happy life, as the subtitle proclaims, or even if they do. One cherry-picked scientific quotation here, one Nassim Nicholas Taleb theory there, sprinkled with a couple of anecdotes from old folks in Okinawa do not constitute scientific evidence. I'm sure regular, high quality healthcare plays the most significant role too. But still. It's a nice, pretty hardback to own and won't take more than a couple of hours to read, especially if you skip the exercise sections and flip to the 10-point summary on page 184.

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  • Rose

    Quick review for a quick read. I definitely like the concept of "ikigai" and looked forward to learning more about the concept based on the description this book gave. However, upon finishing this - I felt that some of the advice was helpful, but very generalized and unfocused in this book. You get tidbits of insight on Japanese culture here, but it's more in the eyes of the authors experiencing the culture than it is direct voicing from the culture itself. That's a problem when you're trying to

    Quick review for a quick read. I definitely like the concept of "ikigai" and looked forward to learning more about the concept based on the description this book gave. However, upon finishing this - I felt that some of the advice was helpful, but very generalized and unfocused in this book. You get tidbits of insight on Japanese culture here, but it's more in the eyes of the authors experiencing the culture than it is direct voicing from the culture itself. That's a problem when you're trying to directly center on aspects which are unique to a specific culture - it shouldn't be told through a lens that's summarized and doesn't give a true backstory. I felt many of the concepts here were helpful ones from a health perspective, but it still wasn't concrete enough for me to feel like it was supported by research, experience, or cultural insights. It's a quick read and doesn't take much time at all to get through, but I would encourage others to - if you're going to pick this up - seek out other narratives that explain the concept of "ikigai" - this only scratches a small surface, and the experience is a bit unfulfilling at the potential opportunities the narrative could've used to dig deeper.

    Overall score: 2.5/5 stars.

  • Imogen

    - This book was simply written and concise (for the most part), with little emphasis on flowery or pretentious writing, thus making for a quick and easy read.

    - The cover of this book is stunning. It's 100% why I picked the book up.

    - As someone wh

    - This book was simply written and concise (for the most part), with little emphasis on flowery or pretentious writing, thus making for a quick and easy read.

    - The cover of this book is stunning. It's 100% why I picked the book up.

    - As someone who was unfamiliar with Ikigai, this was a fair introduction, which covered a lot of the fundamental aspects in just the right amount of detail to keep me interested, without overwhelming me. I think that a lot of the negative reviews come from people who already knew and understood Ikigai, so perhaps this book would be better marketed as

    ?

    - I don't know if the authors were trying to cover too much in one book here; ideas and concepts were thrown in for a paragraph (or even simply named-dropped), and the focus of the book jumped around from sentence to sentence. I feel like more focus on Ikigai as a concept was needed as opposed to Ikigai

    Okinawa

    mindfulness

    tai chi

    yoga

    Morita therapy

    every type of meditation etc. etc.

    - The book gets repetitive towards the end. Mediation and vegetable patches appear to have a mention per page.

    - The book mentions a lot of case studies to demonstrates points, but none are taken past surface level. Whilst they were all interesting

    , I would have liked to have been given greater depth and understanding of some of them in regards to Ikigai.

    - 'It has been scientifically shown'...

    . I felt like my psychology teacher reading this book at some points, begging for some evidence or outlined research to support what the authors were saying. Instead, I got generalised, vague statements that were backed up with unnamed or missing studies.

  • 7jane

    The book's title is a little misleading: while it does talk about ikigai, it also talks about what things are connected to it, and the main point is on having a long, happy, healthy(ish) life, as seen from the (mostly) Okinawan way of life. The authors traveled to Ogimi, which is in Okinawa, Japan, and spent time there interviewing and observing the oldest people, who all seemed to have this ikigai (the reason to get up in the morning), a joy of life and very active daily activities.

    The chapters

    The book's title is a little misleading: while it does talk about ikigai, it also talks about what things are connected to it, and the main point is on having a long, happy, healthy(ish) life, as seen from the (mostly) Okinawan way of life. The authors traveled to Ogimi, which is in Okinawa, Japan, and spent time there interviewing and observing the oldest people, who all seemed to have this ikigai (the reason to get up in the morning), a joy of life and very active daily activities.

    The chapters talk about things like the state of flow, logotherapy and morita-therapy which both can well connect to the ikigai-concept, on being active, what one should eat, exercises, and facing problems and change. Each chapter seems to add and/or comment something to the main idea, and one chapter focuses on the people of Ogimi itself.

    The three stars were mainly because I didn't agree with everything, but then not everything needs to be agreed on. Also many of the things were familiar to me already. That said, neither point made me angry or make me regret buying/reading the book, and the book was a quick read. I think the majority of the information was still great, and made the book absolutely worth reading and keeping. Buettner's "Blue Zones" book might be more worth to read (and to read first), but just reading this might be inspiring enough - or make a good adding to the book mentioned.

  • Helen

    Meh. It's really just a recap of The Blue Zones of Happiness with emphasis on the Okinawa aspect. The quote I find most disconcerting, after reading the entire book, is "There is no perfect strategy to connecting with our ikigai"....but (what we learn from the Okinawans) is "don't worry too much about finding it." But then, in the next and final page, they say, "if you don't know what your ikigai is yet, as Viktor Frankl says, your mission is to discover it."

    So which is it? And aside from exerci

    Meh. It's really just a recap of The Blue Zones of Happiness with emphasis on the Okinawa aspect. The quote I find most disconcerting, after reading the entire book, is "There is no perfect strategy to connecting with our ikigai"....but (what we learn from the Okinawans) is "don't worry too much about finding it." But then, in the next and final page, they say, "if you don't know what your ikigai is yet, as Viktor Frankl says, your mission is to discover it."

    So which is it? And aside from exercising and eating vegetables, how do we find this elusive purpose? "Do stuff that gives you Flow"...I don't believe ikigai/purpose necessarily provide an inclination toward Flow. But if that is the case, read Csikszentmihalyi's book rather than this one.

  • Jasmin Martin

    I expected more but this book disappoints. It doesnt seem to follow a clear thread but rather jumps randomly around from one fact to another (which the authors thought relevant) such as stress and what it does to the body, and then short profiles on some of the longest lived persons on the planet. These don't have much to do with the Ogimi folk of Okinawa that the researchers were going to visit and interview. I though they were going to write about them and their entire time spent with them, bu

    I expected more but this book disappoints. It doesnt seem to follow a clear thread but rather jumps randomly around from one fact to another (which the authors thought relevant) such as stress and what it does to the body, and then short profiles on some of the longest lived persons on the planet. These don't have much to do with the Ogimi folk of Okinawa that the researchers were going to visit and interview. I though they were going to write about them and their entire time spent with them, but this is only a small feature in the book. The other thing that annoys me is when scientists try to interpret something abstract and philosophical using an outsider's point of view and quantitative methods. Already when they wrote in the beginning chapter that they couldn't believe that only the Okinawan diet and some other 'lesser' important activities could help the population live long, I thought, ok, here we go. Basically what this book told me was that they hadn't understood anything. And were coming quite late to the party with facts about health, holism and nature, that can be read and explored much better in other books. Not worth the read.

  • BookishDubai

    This book has nothing to do with

    . Honestly it should've been titled

    .

  • Chris Chester

    I kind of feel bad panning this book, because I think helping people find their ikigai -- or their purpose in life -- is a worthwhile goal.

    The problem is, I have to think that the author and his publisher know that this book doesn't come anywhere close to achieving that goal.

    Instead, this book is a jumbled mess. It borrows heavily from the work of others, from Victor Frankl to the guys studying flow states, slaps on a thin veneer of received wisdom from Japanese octogenarians and attempts to pas

    I kind of feel bad panning this book, because I think helping people find their ikigai -- or their purpose in life -- is a worthwhile goal.

    The problem is, I have to think that the author and his publisher know that this book doesn't come anywhere close to achieving that goal.

    Instead, this book is a jumbled mess. It borrows heavily from the work of others, from Victor Frankl to the guys studying flow states, slaps on a thin veneer of received wisdom from Japanese octogenarians and attempts to pass the whole thing off as a guide for living.

    And when I say the veneer of Japanese culture is thin, I mean it is THIN. The author took a trip to Okinawa at some point and has some quotes from old folks there. He makes references to big cultural figures like Miyazaki and Murakami, does some hand-waving at tai-chi and green tea and calls it a day.

    And the whole package isn't even put together well. It repeats itself several times (did you know old people on Okinawa tend vegetable gardens? because you will hear about it!) and the structure is just a jumbled mess.

    Stay away.

  • Gabriela

    I could live with the fact that every idea about the Western approach to finding a purpose in life is taken from Frankl, Taleb and a few others. With no personal contribution from the authors. But to claim that you interviewed 100 people from Okinawa and to present your readers with no more than 5 pages of random (and in no way revealing, profound or even interesting) quotes from these interviews...that is just disrespectful. To the reader and to the interviewees.

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