Un chemin de tables

Un chemin de tables

Brasserie parisienne, restaurant étoilé, auberge gourmande, bistrot gastronomique, taverne mondialisée, cantine branchée, Mauro, jeune cuisinier autodidacte, traverse Paris à vélo, de place en place, de table en table. Un parcours dans les coulisses d’un monde méconnu, sondé à la fois comme haut-lieu du patrimoine national et comme expérience d’un travail, de ses gestes, d...

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Title:Un chemin de tables
Author:Maylis de Kerangal
Rating:
Edition Language:French

Un chemin de tables Reviews

  • Bonnye Reed

    I thoroughly enjoyed The Cook, a short novel of the life, growth, and adventures of a young wanna-be cook who ambles his way through France, Germany, Italy and back to France picking up skills and recipes and presentations as he goes, refining the art of food preparation as he matures into a chef extraordinaire.

    I think you will enjoy Mauro, as well. I am pleased to recommend this novel, written in French by Maylis de Kerangal and translated by Sam Taylor, to friends and family.

    I received a fre

    I thoroughly enjoyed The Cook, a short novel of the life, growth, and adventures of a young wanna-be cook who ambles his way through France, Germany, Italy and back to France picking up skills and recipes and presentations as he goes, refining the art of food preparation as he matures into a chef extraordinaire.

    I think you will enjoy Mauro, as well. I am pleased to recommend this novel, written in French by Maylis de Kerangal and translated by Sam Taylor, to friends and family.

    I received a free electronic copy of this novel from Netgalley, Maylis de Kerangal, and Farrar, Straus & Giroux in exchange for an honest review. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me.

    pub date March 26, 2019

    Farrar, Straus & Giroux

    GNAB .

  • Mandy

    This short book from French writer Maylis de Kerangal reads more like a documentary or long journal article than a piece of fiction, but is none the less compelling for that. It’s the fictional biography of a young Parisian, Mauro, and his odyssey through the world of restaurants and cooking. Narrated by an unnamed friend, the tone is curiously detached as we follow his career in various establishments and in various countries. I found it an absorbing read in spite of its unemotional style, and

    This short book from French writer Maylis de Kerangal reads more like a documentary or long journal article than a piece of fiction, but is none the less compelling for that. It’s the fictional biography of a young Parisian, Mauro, and his odyssey through the world of restaurants and cooking. Narrated by an unnamed friend, the tone is curiously detached as we follow his career in various establishments and in various countries. I found it an absorbing read in spite of its unemotional style, and I very much enjoyed accompanying Mauro as he built his career, with all the highs and lows this entailed. An interesting insight into the world of a chef, for sure.

  • Dorie

    The Cook

    by Maylis de Kerangel

    Translated by Sam Taylor

    2016

    Farrar,Straus, and Giroux

    4.0 / 5.0

    This is a memoir, written by a fictionalized cook, Mauro, and his culinary career in Berlin. Learning to bake cakes at 10 with no recipe, he went on to various jobs in restaurants, until finally opening one of his own. After 10 years he burnt out and sold it.

    This is amazingly deep for a novel that is about 100 pages. Mauro is vivid, earnest, humble and

    The Cook

    by Maylis de Kerangel

    Translated by Sam Taylor

    2016

    Farrar,Straus, and Giroux

    4.0 / 5.0

    This is a memoir, written by a fictionalized cook, Mauro, and his culinary career in Berlin. Learning to bake cakes at 10 with no recipe, he went on to various jobs in restaurants, until finally opening one of his own. After 10 years he burnt out and sold it.

    This is amazingly deep for a novel that is about 100 pages. Mauro is vivid, earnest, humble and so easy to like. His career you want to follow.

    Entertaining and engaging.

  • Caroline

    4.25 stars

    If you will allow me the food pun, this novella makes for a nice little literary meal. For me, the pleasure was not so much in the plot (there isn't much, just slice-of-life sections that follow a young man on his journey to becoming a chef), but in the exquisite descriptions of food and culinary life. I liked how the tension between the young chef's passion for food and his (wander)lust for life come to fruition at the end of the book, uniting his personal philosophy with

    4.25 stars

    If you will allow me the food pun, this novella makes for a nice little literary meal. For me, the pleasure was not so much in the plot (there isn't much, just slice-of-life sections that follow a young man on his journey to becoming a chef), but in the exquisite descriptions of food and culinary life. I liked how the tension between the young chef's passion for food and his (wander)lust for life come to fruition at the end of the book, uniting his personal philosophy with his career ambitions. I found it very satisfying.

    The prose is clean and economical, distilling the author's message perfectly without any fluff--a bildungsroman in a quarter of the usual length. And as usual, I will comment on the translation: excellent, unobtrusive. Wish I knew more French to be able to read it in the original :P.

    A nice read for any foodie, though it will leave you hungry (literally--I need to go cook something now).

  • Rebecca

    This is a pleasant enough little book, composed of scenes in the life of a fictional chef named Mauro. Each chapter picks up with the young man at a different point as he travels through Europe, studying and working in various restaurants. He began his informal apprenticeship as a teen when he made hearty, gourmet-ish meals for his five friends. Gradually you work out that the narrator is a female friend. Thankfully, she doesn’t idealize Mauro; she realistically portrays his faults (workaholic,

    This is a pleasant enough little book, composed of scenes in the life of a fictional chef named Mauro. Each chapter picks up with the young man at a different point as he travels through Europe, studying and working in various restaurants. He began his informal apprenticeship as a teen when he made hearty, gourmet-ish meals for his five friends. Gradually you work out that the narrator is a female friend. Thankfully, she doesn’t idealize Mauro; she realistically portrays his faults (workaholic, anyone?), his cynicism and his occasional depression.

    If you’ve read

    /

    , you’ll know that de Kerangal writes exquisite prose. Here the descriptions of meals are mouthwatering, and the kitchen’s often tense relationships come through powerfully. (And, luckily, the author doesn’t include lots of abstruse vocabulary words this time.) Overall, though, I’m not hugely enthusiastic. My average rating reflects the fact that I didn’t know what all these scenes are meant to add up to. Who is this Mauro in the end, and what does it matter?

    , a linked short story collection, does a better job of capturing a chef and her milieu. (Out March 26th.)

    by Muriel Barbary

    “He is youthful, calm, saturnine, furtive. A cat. A Perrier with a slice of lemon. But what I need to describe are his hands. They work, work all the time; they are high-caliber tools, sensitive instruments that create, touch, test—sensors.”

  • Lolly K Dandeneau

    via my blog:

    'To be a chef, you have to be prepared to get hurt.'

    The Cook is a fictional novel about the making of Parisian chef Mauro told from his friend’s perspective. In the beginning he is remembering his University days, knowing he will not go back, and the summer he meets his first cook that ‘introduces him to another realm’, and Mauro ‘loves how she lives’ connected as she is to the earth, the seasons and the farm which he works with all the fresh vegetables. In a moment,

    via my blog:

    'To be a chef, you have to be prepared to get hurt.'

    The Cook is a fictional novel about the making of Parisian chef Mauro told from his friend’s perspective. In the beginning he is remembering his University days, knowing he will not go back, and the summer he meets his first cook that ‘introduces him to another realm’, and Mauro ‘loves how she lives’ connected as she is to the earth, the seasons and the farm which he works with all the fresh vegetables. In a moment, later in an apartment he finds a book on cooking in his duffel bag, and everything shifts.

    We travel back through the days of his youth when the young gastronome was a curious little fellow often hovering around in the kitchen, inhaling the smells of his mother and grandmother’s cooking. His first meals are made from simple, cheap foods but later he will travel to different countries, broadening his food education, creating recipes from different cultures, absorbing different sights and smells. He will perfect the alchemy of the kitchen, where at ten he will create cakes from recipes, as if it’s like a magical act. Later he will learn the brutality of the kitchen, suffer the tyranny of demanding chefs, work in kitchens of many cultures and burn himself out once he is running La Belle Saison, ‘until finally his life is reduced to the surface of a countertop.’ But it will not be the end of his cooking, he will return to his passion but only in places where it is for the love of cooking alone, far from ‘chain restaurants’ and overwhelming crowds. Mauro truly lives the life of a chef, with little free time as hones his skills. Too often friendships fall by the wayside, because there isn’t any time, his world truly is reduced to his career.

    To escape the deadened feeling within him, his exhaustion, he later finds himself in Asia. He is done with frantic and wants peace, despite the offers that pour in. Some travel to see the wonderous sites, Mauro prefers to sink into the culture of the palate wherever he wanders. He never stays still for long, seeking other work in many kitchen until the tail end of the book where he has an idea for a place that caters to the diners, a ‘collective adventure’ that also pleases individual desires.

    It’s not simply a book about working your way into becoming a chef, it’s about the emotional journey, the shaping of a chef’s life. Mauro isn’t your usual cook either, he is looking for meaning on a spiritual level in a sense, which you don’t usually get when reading about chefs. I think from the beginning when he opens his eyes to the farm, nature to the table, the sense of community means he could never be content to waste his days in a popular place that bustles. It’s a fast read, I wonder if I would have been engaged more if Mauro himself told his story and I could be in his head rather than feeling more like a fly on the wall, a second hand witness of sorts as his friend does all the talking. It was a decent read, a different perspective on a chef’s life, which truly is much more exhausting than I ever imagined. I cook often and it’s tiring but that’s solely for my family. It is certainly a physical endeavor, for Mauro it is all-consuming. I certainly don’t have to take anyone pushing me around or knocking me in the face with a spoon if I screw up. All that waits for me is sour faces pushing their plate away and refusing to eat. There is a love story within too but that doesn’t last because his first love is food, and it demands all of him. He is lost at times, burned out, but he always wanders the world chasing the next place, trying to fill his culinary knowledge. The Cook is an original little novel. I would like more connection to Mauro, yet it is still worth the read.

    Publication Date: March 26, 2019

    Farrar, Straus and Giroux

  • angelareadsbooks

    I love stories about food. Books, movies, documentaries. So when I saw this short Book I jumped at the chance to review it. The Cook is the story of a young chef as he finds his way in the culinary world. Trying different cuisines, working in kitchens, and even opening a restaurant of his own. While reading this book the life of a chef came alive. It was like a documentary in a book form. My only wish was there was more read. This book releases March 26, 2019!

    Thank you to Netgalley and the publ

    I love stories about food. Books, movies, documentaries. So when I saw this short Book I jumped at the chance to review it. The Cook is the story of a young chef as he finds his way in the culinary world. Trying different cuisines, working in kitchens, and even opening a restaurant of his own. While reading this book the life of a chef came alive. It was like a documentary in a book form. My only wish was there was more read. This book releases March 26, 2019!

    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book!

  • Meike

    "The Cook" is an exploration of human passion: The novella follows Mauro, a young Parisian student and food enthusiast, on his path to becoming a professional cook, changing restaurants and travelling the world in order to widen his personal and professional horizon, constantly moving in oder to find his own destination. The story is told from the perspective of a friend about whom we learn next to nothing: She serves as a narrative device to track the protagonist's development, but also his cha

    "The Cook" is an exploration of human passion: The novella follows Mauro, a young Parisian student and food enthusiast, on his path to becoming a professional cook, changing restaurants and travelling the world in order to widen his personal and professional horizon, constantly moving in oder to find his own destination. The story is told from the perspective of a friend about whom we learn next to nothing: She serves as a narrative device to track the protagonist's development, but also his changing appearance and state of mind. Mauro follows his ambition and encounters his own limitations, re-adjusts and tries to balance different aspects of his life without giving up on his passion - this book is a novel of development, set in the culinary world, that also discusses cultural aspects of cooking and dining, like food as art or as a communal experience.

    I wouldn't subscribe that the text is "hyperrealistic" (as the blurb claims for some reason), but the narration certainly plays with the detachment of the journalistic report, which gives the text a special feel. On top of that, Sam Taylor did an excellent job with the translation (as you would expect from the guy who translated Binet's hyper-complex

    ). This book certainly made me want to read more Maylis de Kerangal.

  • Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I'm going to join the chorus of perplexed readers who say this is not really a novel, but we don't know what to call it. It's a novella-length narration of a fictional chef's life, and while you get some peeks into his personality, there is not really much of a story, per se. Just descriptions of his work life as he moves from place to place. You can see he is gaining in knowledge, passion, and reputation, but you don't really get much farther. It's rather like a documentary film crew following

    I'm going to join the chorus of perplexed readers who say this is not really a novel, but we don't know what to call it. It's a novella-length narration of a fictional chef's life, and while you get some peeks into his personality, there is not really much of a story, per se. Just descriptions of his work life as he moves from place to place. You can see he is gaining in knowledge, passion, and reputation, but you don't really get much farther. It's rather like a documentary film crew following a career, but with words.

    I mean, I enjoyed it. But this is nowhere near the beauty and depth of the previous novel I so loved by this author, The Heart. This is a great example of descriptive writing but really that should be a component of something larger for readers to make any meaning of the details.

  • Diane Barnes

    Hmmmmm. Can't rate this lower or higher cause not sure exactly what I read. Thumbnail sketch of a cook. I only finished because it was 100 pages of a small size book.

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