All-of-a-Kind Family Hanukkah

All-of-a-Kind Family Hanukkah

The beloved characters from Sydney Taylor's All-of-a-Kind Family return in this heartwarming picture book from a critically adored team--perfect for Hanukkah gift-giving! Acclaimed author Emily Jenkins (A Greyhound, a Groundhog) and Caldecott Award-winning artist Paul O. Zelinsky (Rapunzel) bring the beloved All-of-a-Kind Family to life in a new format. Fans, along with those just meeting the five girls (()(A...

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Title:All-of-a-Kind Family Hanukkah
Author:Emily Jenkins
Rating:

All-of-a-Kind Family Hanukkah Reviews

  • Lynn

    The All-of-a-Kind Family books were one of my absolute favorite series when I was a kid. I nearly wore the pages out, reading them over and over again and I remember what an enormous treat it was when we'd go to Brentano's Book store in Chicago where I could actually BUY the next in the series.

    Thank you Emily Jenkins and Paul Zelinsky for this sweet and wonderful treat - a lovely visit with these dearly loved characters. I was not disappointed as this artistic team has absolutely cap

    The All-of-a-Kind Family books were one of my absolute favorite series when I was a kid. I nearly wore the pages out, reading them over and over again and I remember what an enormous treat it was when we'd go to Brentano's Book store in Chicago where I could actually BUY the next in the series.

    Thank you Emily Jenkins and Paul Zelinsky for this sweet and wonderful treat - a lovely visit with these dearly loved characters. I was not disappointed as this artistic team has absolutely captured the spirit of the stories.

    Totally charming and I hope it will turn other children on to the joys of this classic series.

  • Cheryl

    Hanukkah, 1912, little 4 year old Gertie anxiously awaits their annual latkes while getting a reminder on the season's rituals and history. Her four sisters and mother are making preparations for the feast, dicing, peeling, grating, frying and Gertie wants to be a part of the humm, but her mother deems the tools too sharp and the grease too hot for inexperienced hands. A tantrum ensues and she is banished to her room until her father comes home and entices her out from under the bed with a promi

    Hanukkah, 1912, little 4 year old Gertie anxiously awaits their annual latkes while getting a reminder on the season's rituals and history. Her four sisters and mother are making preparations for the feast, dicing, peeling, grating, frying and Gertie wants to be a part of the humm, but her mother deems the tools too sharp and the grease too hot for inexperienced hands. A tantrum ensues and she is banished to her room until her father comes home and entices her out from under the bed with a promise of lighting the first candle. Based on the classic by Sydney Taylor, it is beautifully illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky. The story of Hanukkah is added at the end, for a refresher.

  • Marjorie Ingall

    I wanted to dislike this SO MUCH! HOW DARE THEY MESS WITH GENERATIONS OF JEWISH WOMEN'S CHILDHOOD MEMORIES?? Yeah, no worries. Jenkins and Zelinsky NAILED IT. What an accomplishment, especially given the weight of expectations among

    (those who know, know). Review at

  • Joan

    This was a delight to read! I grew up on All of A Kind Family so this was sheer nostalgia for me! I am already looking forward to sharing it someday with a grandchild. Gertie is the youngest and just too little to help! She ends up throwing a temper tantrum and Mama leads her to the bedroom to wait till the holiday meal is ready. Eventually Papa comes in from work (I'm assuming...that generation didn't take time off for much of anything!) and asks the pillow and other objects where Gertie was. T

    This was a delight to read! I grew up on All of A Kind Family so this was sheer nostalgia for me! I am already looking forward to sharing it someday with a grandchild. Gertie is the youngest and just too little to help! She ends up throwing a temper tantrum and Mama leads her to the bedroom to wait till the holiday meal is ready. Eventually Papa comes in from work (I'm assuming...that generation didn't take time off for much of anything!) and asks the pillow and other objects where Gertie was. That made Gertie smile.

    I have to disagree with those complaining that Mama was made the bad guy. Mama was trying to get a huge holiday meal together. Putting the child away was a kind and sensible solution. It also fits Mama's personality in the original All-Of-A-Kind Family series. Mama was loving but busy all the time. She had a new baby every two years, so she was always tired if you ask me. The family was dirt poor but the girls were shielded from the worst of the poverty of the area by the love of the parents for the girls. However, Mama simply had no time to indulge a child's temper tantrums. The celebration had to be on time, right as the sun was setting. She had no other choice but to pop Charlotte into the bedroom. And those tools and that stove were dangerous! This was waaay before any consideration was given to making things safe for the consumer! Mama was plenty smart to keep Gertie from perhaps being scalded and scarred for life by taking her away from the cooking latkes in hot oil!

    Definitely recommended! But adults will also get pleasure out of reading the back matter.

  • Chris

    This is a lovely picture book about a much-loved series for kids that was written almost 70 years ago. Sweet story, telling of Hanukkah traditions, a large Jewish family at the turn of the 20th century, and particularly the making of latkes. Not super crazy about the illustrations, for some reason....

  • Kit Feral

    As a lonely only I remember well reading books about this big family and wishing to be in it. This book is a sweet homage.

  • Manybooks

    While how in

    Emily Jenkins (narrative) and Paul O. Zelinsky (accompanying illustrations) describe and portray Hanukkah celebration (including their religious and cultural significances in and for Judaism) have been both textually informative and visually delightful (with especially Zelinsky's illustrative layout of the All-of-a-Kind Family's 1912 New York City tenement apartment being very much and personally appreciated), I do have to admit that in particular Mama's approa

    While how in

    Emily Jenkins (narrative) and Paul O. Zelinsky (accompanying illustrations) describe and portray Hanukkah celebration (including their religious and cultural significances in and for Judaism) have been both textually informative and visually delightful (with especially Zelinsky's illustrative layout of the All-of-a-Kind Family's 1912 New York City tenement apartment being very much and personally appreciated), I do have to admit that in particular Mama's approach to her youngest daughter Gertie's desires to also help with the preparations of the latkes has kind of bothered me a trifle and rubbed me the wrong proverbial way.

    For while the mother's concerns that Gertie might hurt herself trying to help with peeling, grating, chopping and the like are indeed and from a realism point of departure more than justified (and that she and Gertie's older sisters are of course likely also rushing to get everything done on time), I personally do feel that Emily Jenkins has with the mother constantly simply saying NO and then just sending a pouting and justifiably annoyed and feeling left out Gertie for a time-out in the bedroom kind of not captured how in my opinion in the

    novels, the mother used to handle and approach questions of discipline and such (in other words, that if Emily Jenkins were to have totally kept to the spirit and also to the general contents of Sydney Taylor's novels, in her

    , Jenkins should have had the mother, she should have made Mama find an imaginative way to include little Gertie in the process and the preparations for the latkes without exposing her to possible dangers and threats from sharp kitchen implements and hot grease, that the Mama of the

    novels would in my humble opinion not simply have left her youngest daughter so completely out of the latkes preparation process).

    And therefore, while the general early 20th century America and especially the Hanukkah ambience and atmosphere penned by Emily Jenkins and illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky in

    have felt totally and utterly realistic (and yes, generally also an authentic mirror of Sydney Taylor's

    novels) and albeit I find that both the father (that Papa) and the five girls have been textually successfully enough captured by the author, by Emily Jenkins, I personally really do not think that she has been in any manner equally successful with regard to her narrational renderings of Mama, with regard to the mother, as I for one firmly do believe that considering how in Sydney Taylor's

    series both Mama and Papa are generally always pretty imaginative with regard to discipline and making sure that their daughters are approached fairly and equally, how Emily Jenkins has penned the episode with Gertie just feels somewhat if not actually rather off to and for me (a realistic enough portrayal perhaps if one only and simply looks at the story at hand, but really not all that much so if one looks at

    as a companion piece to the

    novels).

    Still (and my criticisms notwithstanding)

    remains recommended (with the supplemental information at the back, the short glossary of Yiddish terms, the detailed author's and illustrator's notes and of course that Emily Jenkins has listed the

    novels in sequence of appearance as well as including her bibliographical sources being very much personally appreciated, since the latter, aside from being a great academic research resource, also really does show just how much research Jenkins obviously has engaged in). However, from a personal reading pleasure point of view, while I have certainly much appreciated and even liked

    for what is is and what it represents, I definitely would have enjoyed the story very much and considerably more had Emily Jenkins rendered the mother a bit more akin and alike to what I remember her as being in Sydney Taylor's incomparable and in all ways absolutely lovely and delightful

    novels.

  • Ms. Yingling

    Copy provided by Young Adult Books Central

    It's Hanukkah on New York's Lower East Side in 1912. Young Gertie, who is four, is very excited about all of the preparations that her parents and four older sisters are making. Making latkes is especially intriguing, since they are made only once a year. Gertie wants to help, but the others tell her it is too dangerous and she should read her library books instead of trying to help out. Angry, she goes to the next room to hide, thinking they

    Copy provided by Young Adult Books Central

    It's Hanukkah on New York's Lower East Side in 1912. Young Gertie, who is four, is very excited about all of the preparations that her parents and four older sisters are making. Making latkes is especially intriguing, since they are made only once a year. Gertie wants to help, but the others tell her it is too dangerous and she should read her library books instead of trying to help out. Angry, she goes to the next room to hide, thinking they will be sorry they ignored her, but no one comes. Eventually, Papa comes looking for her and takes her out to the family celebration to eat the delicious latkes.

    This simple story is a good introduction to the classic Sydney Taylor All-of-a-Kind Family (1951) middle grade books, which were some of the first books about Jewish children that reached a main stream audience. Today, there is a Sydney Taylor book award for contributions to Jewish children's literature. These books showcased the daily life and celebrations of a family in an immigrant neighborhood in New York City in the early 1900s and were some of my favorites when I was young-- they were sort of the equivalent of The Brady Bunch when it came to positive and fun depictions of a large family.

    The story is simple and easy to follow, and the notes at the back are helpful in understanding so of the concepts of the time, as well as the history of the series. Zelinsy's drawings, while vastly different from the Joe and Beth Krush illustrations in the original books with all of their fine-line details, depict the era well. The family's apartment is clearly laid out, and made sense for the first time to me-- of course it was just two rooms! The colors are happy, and the sense of movement and joy comes through the rough outlined shapes.

    All-of-a-Kind Hanukkah is a great addition to a collection of holiday books, and also a good way to develop an interest in a classic series. Give this one to readers who love Little House on the Prairie early reader novels, American Girl books, or historical fiction picture books.

  • Abigail

    The All-of-a-Kind-Family prepare for Hanukkah in this new picture-book from author Emily Jenkins and illustrator Paul Zelinsky. As twelve-year-old Ella, ten-year-old Henny, eight-year-old Sarah and six-year-old Charlotte help their mother with various tasks, in order to prepare latkes, four-year-old Gertie feels left out, and throws a tantrum. Her mother sends her to her room, where she stays until her father comes home, and gives her something truly important to do: help to light the first cand

    The All-of-a-Kind-Family prepare for Hanukkah in this new picture-book from author Emily Jenkins and illustrator Paul Zelinsky. As twelve-year-old Ella, ten-year-old Henny, eight-year-old Sarah and six-year-old Charlotte help their mother with various tasks, in order to prepare latkes, four-year-old Gertie feels left out, and throws a tantrum. Her mother sends her to her room, where she stays until her father comes home, and gives her something truly important to do: help to light the first candle on their menorah...

    Having greatly loved Sydney Taylor's five

    novels as a young girl, I was both eagerly excited and somewhat nervous about the publication of

    , which featured the cast of those books in an all new adventure. Fortunately, although I wouldn't describe this one as a new favorite, I found it engaging and heartwarming. I don't know that it really convinced me that this

    the All-of-a-Kind Family of my youth, but it was still a pleasant holiday tale, one paired with appealing artwork from Zelinsky. Recommended to those looking for engaging Hanukkah stories for the picture-book set, and to fans of the Taylor books.

  • Cheryl

    would be a pretty good book if it weren't attached to the famous series. I agree w/ Gundula that it's out of character for Mama to be so impatient with her little one... and at age four there certainly is something that Gertie could have done. But as a stand-alone story, well, lots of mothers do get stressed, especially five children in seven years, immigrants in the city, etc... I think this story is actually more realistic than Taylor's originals.

    I like the il

    would be a pretty good book if it weren't attached to the famous series. I agree w/ Gundula that it's out of character for Mama to be so impatient with her little one... and at age four there certainly is something that Gertie could have done. But as a stand-alone story, well, lots of mothers do get stressed, especially five children in seven years, immigrants in the city, etc... I think this story is actually more realistic than Taylor's originals.

    I like the illustrator's note about the different kinds of styles he considered, too. *Very* much worth reading. All the aftermatter is good, and if I were using this with children I would go to the website linked, for more.

    3.5 stars rounded down because I'm not a fan of reusing others' ideas like this, just on principle.

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