Depth Takes a Holiday

Depth Takes a Holiday

An original and hilarious bestselling set of essays on the ups and downs of today's thirtysomethings...

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Title:Depth Takes a Holiday
Author:Sandra Tsing Loh
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Depth Takes a Holiday Reviews

  • Cara Stevens

    If you've ever lived in LA, you'll get a great laugh out of this book. Her observations are spot-on and funny!

  • Ian

    For my money, the best of the humorous-NPR-essay set. She brandishes a razor-sharp wit but never takes herself too seriously, doesn't get all artsy like David Sedaris with the weird animal stories he's been crapping out for This American Life lately. She's got the self-absorbed, West Coast, low-rent Tom Wolfe style down pat and she's smart enough to ride that sucker all the way to Judgment Day. Not to mention, she's probably the funniest writer I've ever read. Her book reviews in The Atlantic co

    For my money, the best of the humorous-NPR-essay set. She brandishes a razor-sharp wit but never takes herself too seriously, doesn't get all artsy like David Sedaris with the weird animal stories he's been crapping out for This American Life lately. She's got the self-absorbed, West Coast, low-rent Tom Wolfe style down pat and she's smart enough to ride that sucker all the way to Judgment Day. Not to mention, she's probably the funniest writer I've ever read. Her book reviews in The Atlantic consistently reduce me to chuckling, grinning idiocy on the subway, which is great because it earns me a couple of extra inches of

    .

    This book remains hilarious despite being dated.

  • Dolores

    I love the writing of Sandra Tsing Loh because she is incredibly witty and acerbic, and doesn't take herself or anything too seriously. And, she can write about the San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles in language that makes it sound downright pleasant.

    Loh is the Queen of the San Fernando Valley, once a farming community over the hill from Los Angeles, but now a burgeoning suburb. Los Angelenos consider the Valley a foreign country, and, truth be told, getting from Los Angeles to the Va

    I love the writing of Sandra Tsing Loh because she is incredibly witty and acerbic, and doesn't take herself or anything too seriously. And, she can write about the San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles in language that makes it sound downright pleasant.

    Loh is the Queen of the San Fernando Valley, once a farming community over the hill from Los Angeles, but now a burgeoning suburb. Los Angelenos consider the Valley a foreign country, and, truth be told, getting from Los Angeles to the Valley is, literally, an uphill battle over the Sepulveda Pass. But, even though I lived there and know of whence she speaks, you don't need to be a Valley Girl to appreciate her humor.

    This book is a collection of essays on everything from temp jobs to frozen foods, being the less-perfect sibling, her late German mother and her eccentric Chinese father (who keeps importing and losing Chinese brides, and hitch hikes rides with Angelica Huston). Loh's eye is keen, and she can make the most mundane seem downright hysterical.

    Loh is a self-professed procrastinator when it comes to pumping out her writing, and I wish she would do more. But, her columns in the late, lamented Buzz magazine were a scream, and I can only hope she gets more columns and books and maybe even a television show. She is a rare gem.

  • Alice Handley

    Maybe you have to be a certain age (coughgenerationx) and from a certain place (coughsoutherncalifornia), but I find this hilarious.

  • J.

    The title says it all.

    This could really only be about one thing, and it is.

    Welcome to L.A.

  • Lennie

    A collection of essays, written by a fellow Angeleno, regarding the L.A. scene. Some topics include Hollywood, cultural art, pick-up lines, and poetry readings. She even pokes fun at some neighborhoods within L.A. like the Valley, West Covina, and Torrance (where I'm from) but it's all in good humor, so no offense is taken. I found myself nodding in agreement, a few times, as she describes the 405 freeway and Parking Lot C at LAX but most of the time, her essays made me smile or chuckle. A nice,

    A collection of essays, written by a fellow Angeleno, regarding the L.A. scene. Some topics include Hollywood, cultural art, pick-up lines, and poetry readings. She even pokes fun at some neighborhoods within L.A. like the Valley, West Covina, and Torrance (where I'm from) but it's all in good humor, so no offense is taken. I found myself nodding in agreement, a few times, as she describes the 405 freeway and Parking Lot C at LAX but most of the time, her essays made me smile or chuckle. A nice, easy read and I give this book four stars.

  • Catherine

    Sandra Tsing-Loh is hilarious, brilliant, and refreshingly honest. One of the most interesting things about this book: although it's about Los Angeles and is called "depth takes a holiday," she makes a point in the prologue to say that she isn't actually making fun of LA, but saying that sometimes it's necessary to just take it easy and read a light magazine or something--thus taking a holiday from everything depth-oriented ;).

    That said, she does skewer many things about her home turf, LA, beca

    Sandra Tsing-Loh is hilarious, brilliant, and refreshingly honest. One of the most interesting things about this book: although it's about Los Angeles and is called "depth takes a holiday," she makes a point in the prologue to say that she isn't actually making fun of LA, but saying that sometimes it's necessary to just take it easy and read a light magazine or something--thus taking a holiday from everything depth-oriented ;).

    That said, she does skewer many things about her home turf, LA, because it's impossible not to do so, and she also ends with a reference to her wish to live in Telluride or some other small but arty Colorado town (something the protagonist in "If You Lived Here, You'd Be Home By Now" said too).

    Laugh-out loud funny, spot-on, great in so many ways. Definitely set in the '90s and late '90s, but it's easy enough to remember this time, and much of it still applies.

  • Sue Bridehead (A Pseudonym)

    I'm never sure what to think about journalistic collections like this. They always vary in tone depending on the outlet for whom the piece was originally written. You end up feeling like you're reading somebody's personal portfolio, their writing resume in action, instead of a cohesive book with a theme and an evolution.

    Overall, Loh's work is very readable, and the essays are - God bless 'em - short (2 pages each on average). A few are much funnier than others. "White Trash" and one

    I'm never sure what to think about journalistic collections like this. They always vary in tone depending on the outlet for whom the piece was originally written. You end up feeling like you're reading somebody's personal portfolio, their writing resume in action, instead of a cohesive book with a theme and an evolution.

    Overall, Loh's work is very readable, and the essays are - God bless 'em - short (2 pages each on average). A few are much funnier than others. "White Trash" and one about talking dirty stand out for me. The columns where she disingenuously portrays herself as an underemployed slacker are far less appealing. (I guess "White Trash" is one of these, but I forgive it because it's good.)

  • Melissa

    After hearing Loh reader her short story "Bad Sex with Bud Kemp" on NPR's

    I ordered this book, eager to hear more of Loh's dry and witty observations on society and popular culture. Although the content and style of this book is consistent with what I heard on NPR, this book failed to meet my expectations.

    Focusing on her experiences as an overeducated, underpaid, writer/artist living in Los Angeles, Loh does an excellent job of capturing a specific time and place -- pe

    After hearing Loh reader her short story "Bad Sex with Bud Kemp" on NPR's

    I ordered this book, eager to hear more of Loh's dry and witty observations on society and popular culture. Although the content and style of this book is consistent with what I heard on NPR, this book failed to meet my expectations.

    Focusing on her experiences as an overeducated, underpaid, writer/artist living in Los Angeles, Loh does an excellent job of capturing a specific time and place -- perhaps too good of a job. Loh's book is loaded with cultural references that can only be understood by readers who are familiar with L.A. and its arts and culture scene. Though these allusions don't make the stories unintelligible, they do keep the reader at arm's length from the material. Consequently, many of the essays come across as an anecdote that should end with the phrase "I guess you had to be there."

    However,this problem should not discourage prospective readers.

    still entertains readers with tales of attempting to lead an adult life in the post-collegiate years that are told from an Everygirl perspective.

  • D.M. Dutcher

    The first story in the book is a hymn to Ikea.

    This is a collection of short vignettes about whatever a particularly neurotic upper-middle class woman living in LA thinks about. Most don't really go anywhere, and all of them are particularly dated. She plays Nintendo! She is amazed at multimedia CD-Roms! She comments on open-mic poetry readings! Lesbianism! Etc.

    None of them are really long enough to give any depth on whatever she carries, and she's not a good enough writer to make us

    The first story in the book is a hymn to Ikea.

    This is a collection of short vignettes about whatever a particularly neurotic upper-middle class woman living in LA thinks about. Most don't really go anywhere, and all of them are particularly dated. She plays Nintendo! She is amazed at multimedia CD-Roms! She comments on open-mic poetry readings! Lesbianism! Etc.

    None of them are really long enough to give any depth on whatever she carries, and she's not a good enough writer to make us care about her subjects. There's a lot of name dropping, a lot of obsessing over younger women and older men, and once in a while a good reflection or detail. The piece on Baywatch was probably the book's best.

    However, the advance copy i had really didn't even reach the level of a magazine article. Her later Atlantic pieces are far better than this.

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