Mindful Running: How Meditative Running can Improve Performance and Make you a Happier, More Fulfilled Person

Mindful Running: How Meditative Running can Improve Performance and Make you a Happier, More Fulfilled Person

Written by a highly respected fitness journalist, Mindful Running offers an engaging guide to how mindfulness can both optimize your runs and improve general health and well-being.Mindful Running brings together scientific research, expert analysis, and elite athlete contributions to reveal how relating to your mind, body, and surroundings in a new way can help you run longer and faster, as well a/>Mindful...

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Title:Mindful Running: How Meditative Running can Improve Performance and Make you a Happier, More Fulfilled Person
Author:Mackenzie L. Havey
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Mindful Running: How Meditative Running can Improve Performance and Make you a Happier, More Fulfilled Person Reviews

  • Hayley Russell

    As someone with a Ph.D. in sport psychology I really appreciate the research evidence in this book. Mindfulness has clear applications for runners in both experience/enjoyment and performance. It has been fun to apply the material in this book to my own running. A great read!

  • She

    Not the first book I've read on the topic, but I did like it. I'm not a huge fan of the author's writing style, but I did like information, and I feel the book is well researched. I didn't like at all on page 168 where she wrote "Even if you want to try conventional meditation, many of us just flat-out don't have the time." Gasp! That's complete nonsense. Consider the average adult spends three hours per day on their phone and another 2-3 hours per day watching television, I would say that every

    Not the first book I've read on the topic, but I did like it. I'm not a huge fan of the author's writing style, but I did like information, and I feel the book is well researched. I didn't like at all on page 168 where she wrote "Even if you want to try conventional meditation, many of us just flat-out don't have the time." Gasp! That's complete nonsense. Consider the average adult spends three hours per day on their phone and another 2-3 hours per day watching television, I would say that everyone has the time to meditate (even if only for 10 minutes per day). It's all about prioritizing and using time wisely. And like Zen proverb goes: “You should sit in meditation for twenty minutes every day — unless you’re too busy. Then you should sit for an hour.” Her statement just gave everyone a pass on meditation, rather than encouraging them to set aside a few minutes per day to do it (which brings many benefits). Overall a good book and worth reading.

  • Jan Geerling

    In the movie Moneyball protagonist Billy Beane says: “It’s a problem that you think we need to explain ourselves.”

    I really enjoyed reading parts of this book. Many stories and anecdotes struck a chord and motivated me. But the book has one flaw that many self help books have. A big focus on the “why”, and too little focus on the “how”.

    I get that the word “mindfulness” has a certain reputation for being a bit.. fluffy or new-agey. But the writer spend a lohoooooottttt of time explain

    In the movie Moneyball protagonist Billy Beane says: “It’s a problem that you think we need to explain ourselves.”

    I really enjoyed reading parts of this book. Many stories and anecdotes struck a chord and motivated me. But the book has one flaw that many self help books have. A big focus on the “why”, and too little focus on the “how”.

    I get that the word “mindfulness” has a certain reputation for being a bit.. fluffy or new-agey. But the writer spend a lohoooooottttt of time explaining why it’s usefull, and far to little on how to practically apply it to my running routine.

    A great read nonetheless.

  • Robin Larson

    The writing style was not my favorite, but it was well-researched and easy to follow.

    I hope to learn to use the principles of mindfulness to calm my brain - it's like a browser with 300 tabs open at all times! I've never understood how someone could be thinking about nothing - and now I'm going to try to do it myself!

    I'm hoping that being a more mindful runner allows me to put mind over matter, so to speak, when I'm in tough races.

  • Hildeberto

    It's a very informative book. I found myself taking notes all the time. That's a very journalist writing, since the author is a journalist. It's always good to learn more about ourselves and how to set our minds to achieve more in running, but as a man, I felt the book slightly biased to female runners. That's OK though.

  • Amber Thiessen

    Having taken the MBCT course, I was interested to read about how to apply those concepts to running. I am not a regular runner, but I would like to improve. She provides ideas for practicing mindfulness in your running; developing an awareness of thoughts and emotions while you run, an awareness of your body, in fatigue and pain, and cultivating an attitude of gratitude. She uses stories from different professional runners who share how mindful practices have positively influenced their running

    Having taken the MBCT course, I was interested to read about how to apply those concepts to running. I am not a regular runner, but I would like to improve. She provides ideas for practicing mindfulness in your running; developing an awareness of thoughts and emotions while you run, an awareness of your body, in fatigue and pain, and cultivating an attitude of gratitude. She uses stories from different professional runners who share how mindful practices have positively influenced their running and their lives.

  • Rod

    This wasn't quite as good as I hoped it would be, because the idea is really very good indeed. The execution is a little underwhelming, for two or three reasons. First, it works a lot through anecdotes, which is fine and relatable, but not scintillating. Second, it mostly just bolts on mindfulness to the applied notion of running. I already knew the mindfulness stuff, and I already run, so it wasn't a huge leap to make the connection. I was perhaps expecting a little more. And third it sort of t

    This wasn't quite as good as I hoped it would be, because the idea is really very good indeed. The execution is a little underwhelming, for two or three reasons. First, it works a lot through anecdotes, which is fine and relatable, but not scintillating. Second, it mostly just bolts on mindfulness to the applied notion of running. I already knew the mindfulness stuff, and I already run, so it wasn't a huge leap to make the connection. I was perhaps expecting a little more. And third it sort of turns into a phys. ed. how-to book, which isn't super exciting, but I guess that's what the book is for in the end.

  • Julie Arthur

    This book has a ton of great information about how to run more mindfully, as well as some tips for other areas of life. It was an easy read and had a pretty good flow once I got past the first couple technical chapters. Although it's clear the author did a fair amount of research to compile this information, in my opinion the book would've been just as effective without all that technical information. I knew I was already able to run mindfully most of the time, but I was surprised by how many of

    This book has a ton of great information about how to run more mindfully, as well as some tips for other areas of life. It was an easy read and had a pretty good flow once I got past the first couple technical chapters. Although it's clear the author did a fair amount of research to compile this information, in my opinion the book would've been just as effective without all that technical information. I knew I was already able to run mindfully most of the time, but I was surprised by how many of these things I'm already doing. I did try to really focus on this book and give it my full attention, but it just didn't deliver what I was expecting. It was a little technical for me although there were some personal stories from well-known runners. The writing style wasn't my favorite either. I appreciate a good list, but there were a few too many checklists in here to focus on while running and some of the information was a little repetitive. Overall just an okay book for me. Running is definitely a very personal sport and it is what you make it!

  • Neil Gaudet

    A helpful and thoughtful book for runners looking for something other than training plans, nutrition advice and running lore. At some point most of us runners start to wonder about runnings place in our lives. This book frames it well. It’s not the most engaging read at times to be honest but it’s short and ties in mindfulness practices with running well.

  • Felicia

    This book had such promise. Unfortunately, it focuses more on the effects of mindful running than on telling you how to mindful run. The first 2 and a half chapters read like a lengthy unnecessary literature review in a research paper. It was hard for me to get past this part but the book did finally get to the "how" so speak and it was so vague and theoretical I'm not even sure how to apply it. I can't bring myself to push on further with it. I end up falling asleep every time I try.

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