Atlas Alone

Atlas Alone

Hugo Award winner Emma Newman returns to the captivating Planetfall universe with a novel about vengeance, and a woman deciding if she can become a murderer to save the future of humanity.Six months after she left Earth, Dee is struggling to manage her rage toward the people who ordered the nuclear strike that destroyed the world. She’s trying to find those responsible, an...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Atlas Alone
Author:Emma Newman
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Atlas Alone Reviews

  • Justine

    Tense and tightly plotted, this fourth book in the

    series is unputdownable.

    Taking place six months after the events of the chronologically concurrent books

    and

    , Atlas Alone is set on the ship heading for the Pathfinder's world. Deanna, who we first encountered in After Atlas, is the POV character this time around.

    As usual, Newman demonstrates her peerless mastery of delving the emotions and sense experiences of her characters as Dee is confronted by her past

    Tense and tightly plotted, this fourth book in the

    series is unputdownable.

    Taking place six months after the events of the chronologically concurrent books

    and

    , Atlas Alone is set on the ship heading for the Pathfinder's world. Deanna, who we first encountered in After Atlas, is the POV character this time around.

    As usual, Newman demonstrates her peerless mastery of delving the emotions and sense experiences of her characters as Dee is confronted by her past while she investigates and plans for her future.

    Dee's trauma results from the way she lost her parents, her home and childhood, and ultimately her legal personhood, which culminated with a life of corporate indenture. The portrayal of the adult resulting from that trauma is unflinching and complicated, adding a tremendous layer of complexity to the story.

    There are no disappointments to be had here. The Planetfall series continues to be consistently excellent, and Atlas Alone is one of my favourite books of 2019 so far.

  • Juli

    Atlas Alone is the 4th book in the Planetfall series. The prior three books could be read as standalone novels. Each book told the story of the aftermath of a cult's exodus from Earth from a different perspective. Atlas Alone brings the prior plots full circle, bringing back characters from previous books and making references to events in all of the prior Planetfall novels. This isn't a standalone story a reader can jump into before reading the other books in the series. There are spoilers rega

    Atlas Alone is the 4th book in the Planetfall series. The prior three books could be read as standalone novels. Each book told the story of the aftermath of a cult's exodus from Earth from a different perspective. Atlas Alone brings the prior plots full circle, bringing back characters from previous books and making references to events in all of the prior Planetfall novels. This isn't a standalone story a reader can jump into before reading the other books in the series. There are spoilers regarding the endings of a couple of the prior novels and characters whose back stories are essential to understanding the events in this book.

    I accidentally requested this review copy months ago. I don't usually jump in mid-series. The concept sounded so interesting that I backed up and started reading the Planetfall series from the beginning before starting this book. I'm glad I did. This is by far the best science fiction series I've read in a long time. The plots and characters are complex. The first three books showed the aftermath of one event from different perspectives. This fourth book brings it all together to move the storyline along in a way I didn't expect.

    Atlas 2 has left Earth, carrying what's left of humanity after nuclear strikes destroyed much of the planet. Dee speculates that the person who ordered those strikes is on board the ship. She contemplates revenge and submerges herself in "mersives''....complex video games.....to keep herself occupied during the voyage to the colony planet. I liked the gaming aspect of the plot. And as usual with this series the plot was quite complex and sucked me right in. I couldn't stop reading -- totally binge read this book!

    Awesome book!

    **I voluntarily read a review copy of this book from Berkley Publishing. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  • The Captain

    Ahoy there mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings.  While the other three books in the series can be read in any order, this book follows events in after atlas.  While I try to post no spoilers, if ye haven't read that one and keep reading this log then ye have been forewarned and continue at yer own peril . . . .

    I read these books in publishing order and I do recommend that a person new to the series do so as well even

    Ahoy there mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings.  While the other three books in the series can be read in any order, this book follows events in after atlas.  While I try to post no spoilers, if ye haven't read that one and keep reading this log then ye have been forewarned and continue at yer own peril . . . .

    I read these books in publishing order and I do recommend that a person new to the series do so as well even though the first three books be companion standalones.  But like I said, this fourth book should be read last.

    A brief recap.  Book one, planetfall showed the story of  a human colony on a remote alien planet far, far from Earth.  Book two, after atlas, is a sci-fi murder mystery novel set on Earth forty years after the colony ship Atlas has left the planet.  Book three, after mars, is about the an employee of a corporation based on Mars who has to solve a wicked bad case of déjà vu.  And then we come to the fourth book.

    Now I didn't read the blurb for this one and jumped in with blind faith that the author would give me an excellent story.  She did.  This installment involves the colony ship, Atlas 2 and picks up from where book two left off.  It showcases the familiar Dee, a dedicated gamer struggling to deal with the consequences of leaving Earth behind.  Dee's anger is making her want someone to blame.  She just has to figure out who and then get revenge.

    And that's all yer gonna get from me about the plot because of spoilers.  I think some readers will be surprised that this book did not take place on the colony planet.  I was.  But after a small mental adjustment, I was drawn right into this tale.  Like the previous three books, this is another character study where the plot (while fun) takes a backseat to the portrayal of the inner workings of a person and what makes them tick.  I read this in one sitting.

    The nice part about this book is that we already know so much about the other two main characters (Carl and Travis) and ye get to see them from the perspective of Dee who previously was a minor character.  I actually found Dee to be extremely sympathetic and wanted her to succeed and get out of the mess she's in.  I did guess one of the major plot points of Dee's troubles and also an aspect of the overall ending but it didn't bother me too much.  There were small issues about character development and the bad guys.  But I should have known the reasons would be revealed.  I just had to wait for it all to unfold.

    I loved this installment and highly recommend it.  I do hope we get at least one more story of life back on the colony planet.  While waiting to find out if the author is going to have one, do pick up any of the Planetfall books and treat yerself to a delightful story.

    Check out me other reviews at

  • Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    Picking up in the aftermath of the previous Planetfall novels, Atlas Alone was particularly dark and rather depressing. At its core, this was a story of revenge and the subsequent fallout of those actions.

    All the books in the Planetfall series are loosely connected to each other and are largely considered to be companion novels, rather than direct sequels. However, this fourth novel was much more dependant on the setup of the previous books.

    Picking up in the aftermath of the previous Planetfall novels, Atlas Alone was particularly dark and rather depressing. At its core, this was a story of revenge and the subsequent fallout of those actions.

    All the books in the Planetfall series are loosely connected to each other and are largely considered to be companion novels, rather than direct sequels. However, this fourth novel was much more dependant on the setup of the previous books. In order to fully understand this story, readers should ideally read the three previous books before starting this one. As a warning, the first few chapters of Atlas Alone will completely spoil the endings of both After Atlas and Before Mars. If readers intend to read all of the books in this series, then they really should read through them in chronological order, saving this one for last.

    Compared to the previous Planetfall novels, Atlas Alone most closely resembled the second book, After Atlas. The novel featured the same characters, including Carlos and his friend Deanna who was the primary perspective in this novel. I consider Newman to be an exceptionally strong author for creating well developed, multifaceted characters. Therefore, I was disappointed in the charazations in this novel, finding Deanna to read quite flat.  After Atlas was previosly my least favourite book in the series so unfortunately those similarities did not enhance my enjoyment of this novel. However, I know that many readers loved After Atlas and would, therefore, love this follow up novel a lot more than I did..

    While not my favourite in the series, I would still recommend this novel to fans of the previous books. Furthermore, I would recommend the entire Planetfall series to any science fiction readers who enjoy character driven narratives.

    Disclaimer: I requested a copy of this book from the publisher for review.

  • Chris

    *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*

    Atlas Alone is the fourth in Emma Newman’s ‘Planetfall’ series, though (as I can attest) it also works as a standalone novel. There are some callbacks to the earlier works, but while they add additional flavour and context, you can quite happily read this book on its own.

    This is a story which examines big ideas in a futuristic setting. And a story about one person, and the choices which they make, and why. And a story about the near future, and what

    *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review*

    Atlas Alone is the fourth in Emma Newman’s ‘Planetfall’ series, though (as I can attest) it also works as a standalone novel. There are some callbacks to the earlier works, but while they add additional flavour and context, you can quite happily read this book on its own.

    This is a story which examines big ideas in a futuristic setting. And a story about one person, and the choices which they make, and why. And a story about the near future, and what it may look like. And a story about colonising other worlds, and what that may look like. All these facets of the narrative are wound together into a narrative which crackles with potential, and works hard to live up to that potential.

    Our protagonist is Dee. Dee is clever, and driven, and very goal oriented. Dee also struggles with people, with the kind of social cues that most of us take for granted. Where people are kind to her, or affectionate, or less than selfish, Dee is always looking for their angle, trying to understand what their behaviour means, refusing to believe that everyone will not, at some point, fail or betray her. Part of this is due to events of her past, the sort of childhood trauma which could leave anyone on edge. Part is perhaps due to some more interventionist conditioning received as part of an (initially vague) corporate debt deal. The genius of the writing here is in giving us a character so wrapped up in containing their own past, and so affected by it as to be atypically non-empathetic – and getting the reader to feel empathy for that character, to understand them on their own terms.

    Dee’s internal voice is an angular, precise, edged thing, which makes for sometimes difficult, but utterly believable reading. It matches perfectly with the self-contained emotional chameleon that Dee has perfected as an exterior – giving people what they expect, and hiding what remains of herself, past the façade, behind barriers of pain and emotional armour.

    Given we’re in Dee’s head, I’d be hard put to describe her as a good person – but that’s one of the questions the text gives to the reader as it progresses. Whether the actions which Dee takes are the right ones is, it seems, a matter of moral perspective. Because Dee is on a spaceship, which appears to have barely escaped the ruination of Earth in a cataclysm of fire. And it appears that whoever ordered that catastrophe to unfold made sure they were also on that ship. Dee’s initial plan is to find that person, and to make sure they pay for their crime. Doing so will require intelligence, guts, quick thinking, and a mile-wide streak of ruthlessness. As the reader walks that long mile with Dee, we can see the decisions she makes in the face of moral expedience, deciding when enough is enough, shaped by her own remembered pain.

    That moral journey is matched by an investigative one, as Dee delves into some rather dark corners trying to work out what happened, who did it, and how she can get to them. That investigation moves between the sterile corridors of the spaceship Dee calls home, and a variety of sweeping virtual environments. The corridors of the ship are described in a clipped, bare way which leaves them feeling cramped and utilitarian as much as their descriptions do; by contrast, the virtual environs are vividly imagined, richly detailed worlds – and they give us an opportunity to dig into our own future history – such as seeing the prelude to widespread riots in near-future London. In all cases, the world has its own feel; you can taste the smoke in the virtual air, and smell the tang of machined cleaning product in the sparse corridors of the ship around Dee’s compartment. The wider world is there in flashes, in cultural indicators in dialogue, in the studied disdain and flatly keen analysis Dee provides for most of her personal interactions.

    Both edges of this world fit together seamlessly as Dee investigates what she believes is democide, and both feel real. Often bloodily, horrifyingly so. This is a world which pulls no punches, which wants both its characters and the readers to know that every action will have a consequence, and it may be swift and brutal, or it may be slow and corrosive. Dee begins as a prisoner of her past, of her past actions, the actions imposed upon her, and her reactions to them – shaped by trauma and circumstance into who she is – an open blade.

    So, this is a really strong and intriguing character piece, and the world-building is plausible, tight and detailed. But is the story any good? I’d say so. The investigative threads are drawn ever tighter as the narrative progresses, until the tension is as taut as a piano-wire garrotte. There’s some snappy, visceral action scenes wrapped around that thread, and they’re not afraid to be dangerous or bloody or packed with narrative consequence. The threads were never quite going where I expected, which combined with the relentlessly paced prose to keep me turning pages to find out what happened next, and to see my questions answered.

    In the end, this is a story which takes excellent characterisation with an interesting world and an intriguing plot that blends mystery and personal discovery, and combines them into a sterling piece of top notch science fiction.

  • Leseparatist

    I received the ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a review.

    I am not quite sure what to say about this novel! I have been enthralled by this series since I read the first volume, and the fourth novel continues to complicate the world and the story - one not only of individuals but humanity in this dystopian near future. This story is satisfactory, fascinating and complex. I cannot wait for its next chapter. The themes of freedom and enslavement, capitalism and religious fundamentalis

    I received the ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for a review.

    I am not quite sure what to say about this novel! I have been enthralled by this series since I read the first volume, and the fourth novel continues to complicate the world and the story - one not only of individuals but humanity in this dystopian near future. This story is satisfactory, fascinating and complex. I cannot wait for its next chapter. The themes of freedom and enslavement, capitalism and religious fundamentalism, working on one's trauma and wanting justice are explored and at the same time, this novel is a well-paced sf thriller with a central mystery and plot twists. I know what novel I most want to compare it to, but to name it would serve as a spoiler - thinking about it in the beginning certainly primed me to guess the central mystery ahead of its reveal.

    The second most direct comparison for me would be with an episode of Black Mirror - a lot of story beats and construction seems similar, both as a strength and a weakness. Which also means that I think Black Mirror fans could find this book quite interesting.

    At the same time, this novel has some issues with its choice(s) of/for central character. While I found the plot twists interesting and mostly earned, the voice was a little off, and the representation is not necessarily for me to dissect, but falls into some problematic tropes.

    All I can say is that the ending makes me want to read the next book sooner rather than later and I will be looking forward to it.

  • Kaitlin

    * I read this as part of the OWLs readathon for the Divination prompt *

    This book was one of my most anticipated as Emma Newman is one of my all-time favourite people and authors. She always delivers something I haven't seen before and it's always fresh, vibrant, challenging and fun all rolled together. This latest instalment for the Planetfall series is no exception.

    This story can be read as a standalone, but I would highly recommend that you read the previous three before this as I do think tha

    * I read this as part of the OWLs readathon for the Divination prompt *

    This book was one of my most anticipated as Emma Newman is one of my all-time favourite people and authors. She always delivers something I haven't seen before and it's always fresh, vibrant, challenging and fun all rolled together. This latest instalment for the Planetfall series is no exception.

    This story can be read as a standalone, but I would highly recommend that you read the previous three before this as I do think that although you will no doubt understand this one, it makes more sense and gives more context if you have the understanding of the previous books to draw upon. In this story we're even following some of the characters we met previously, and some pretty major events have happened to humanity.

    Dee is our main character. She is fairly isolated and she has suffered through some traumas as a child when her father died. She knows that there is refuge in gaming, and so she frequently slips off into VR and games her nights away. She even has a friend, Carl, who she occasionally does this with.

    Dee is not a thoroughly likable character at first, and she does some pretty bad things later in the book, but her mental health, mindset and isolation are all well covered by Newman over the course of the story and I felt like I had a strong understanding of Dee and her motivations throughout. Really, she just wants to get to the bottom of the mystery of what is left on Earth, and also what they are doing on Atlas II (the spaceship they are all on, travelling away from Earth to a new planet) and who is in control. There are a lot of secrets still to be uncovered, and when a mysterious gamer turns up and shows her the ways of leet gaming (elite and super realistic) she delves deeper.

    Eventually the games and reality seem to merge, and she has to figure out what is real, how these things are happening, and who really is the 'good guy' here...is she even good?

    The setting of this world is cool, there are mersives and AI and all sorts of awesome gadgets I wish were real. Emma continues to intrigue and excite, and this is a future which somehow seems both far-fetched and also tantalisingly realistic. I definitely rate the world and the discussions of this world highly on reasons why I love this so much.

    Overall, superb once again and the audio which is done by Emma is highly recommended too. 4*s again and thoroughly recommended :)

  • Denise

    There were times when I felt like this was a 3 star book at best. I was rarely surprised by the plot twists until the end. As with the other books in this series there are intense psychological issues explored. I think this was not quite as convincing as a portrait of the thinking caused by trauma. Still, I kept with the book (audio with the author reading which I enjoyed) and I can see that the final scene will be crucial to the further story-so 4 stars.

  • Sarah (CoolCurryBooks)

    I ultimately found Atlas Alone to be disappointing. Part of this is that the previous three books have set a high bar, the other part is that I wasn’t happy with the novel’s asexual representation. The majority of this review is devoted to Atlas Alone‘s depiction of asexuality.

    Atlas Alone is the fourth novel in Emma Newman’s Planetfall series. Unlike the others, it isn’t really a stand-alone — I highly recommend reading After Atlas first. This review will contain spoilers for After Atlas, so sto

    I ultimately found Atlas Alone to be disappointing. Part of this is that the previous three books have set a high bar, the other part is that I wasn’t happy with the novel’s asexual representation. The majority of this review is devoted to Atlas Alone‘s depiction of asexuality.

    Atlas Alone is the fourth novel in Emma Newman’s Planetfall series. Unlike the others, it isn’t really a stand-alone — I highly recommend reading After Atlas first. This review will contain spoilers for After Atlas, so stop reading now or hold your peace!

    At the end of After Atlas, Carl, Travis and Dee witnessed a nuclear war that destroyed civilization on Earth. Although the three of them are safe aboard the spaceship Atlas, heading to a new planet, they know that everyone they left behind is dead or dying. And what can they do about it? Dee wants to find out who was responsible for ordering the attack, but she’s got very little information or means of gaining it — she doesn’t even know who is in charge of the Atlas. Luckily, she gets a break when she’s given a new job as a media analyst and invited to join an elite gaming server, where what you can do in the game is limited by your real-life skills. But something weird is going on. An anonymous figure invites her to a different, disturbing game where she encounters the dead bodies of everyone she knows on Earth and details of her past that no one else should know.

    I listened to After Atlas as an audiobook, since I’d realized that Emma Newman herself was the narrator. I don’t have any complaints when it comes to the narration! Emma Newman clearly distinguished all the voices and effectively conveyed the emotions of the characters.

    I loved the way the immersive gaming was used in the novel to depict Dee’s past. It was so creepy, almost verging onto psychological horror. Plus, it’s a wonderful mystery — who is this game creator who knows so much about Dee? I guessed the identity before it was revealed by the narrative, but I still like how that concept was used.

    I’m also glad that Emma Newman decided to continue the plot threads of After Atlas. The nuclear war was one hell of an ending, and I wanted to see the ramifications! Atlas Alone certainly gives us that. I also enjoyed seeing Carl and Travis again, as I really loved them in After Atlas.

    With all that said, here’s the thing I need to talk about with Atlas Alone — Dee is asexual, and as an asexual woman myself, I wasn’t thrilled with the asexual representation in Atlas Alone. Actually, “wasn’t thrilled” is an understatement. I was fairly upset, in part because I was so excited to hear that the fourth Planetfall novel would have an asexual protagonist. One of my favorite series having a book with an asexual lead? It felt like a wish come true!

    In part, I’m writing this review for other asexual people, but I know the majority of people who read this likely won’t be asexual. And given the lack of visibility of the asexual community, I’m going to assume a lot of the people reading this review won’t know basic stereotypes about asexual (ace) people. So if you are asexual yourself and already know this 101 stuff, go ahead and skip the next paragraph.

    Asexuality is a sexual orientation like any other. People on the asexual spectrum don’t experience sexual attraction or experience it in lower amounts than people who are not asexual. Common stereotypes about asexual people are that we are cold, emotionless, robots/aliens/inhuman, broken, all asexual because of trauma, repressed, sociopathic/psychopathic, etc. Here’s a Tumblr post about common asexual stereotypes seen in fiction that provides more detail on the topic and

    A lot of the same stereotypes apply to aromantic people. While Dee is not explicitly stated to be aromantic, she seems to be coded that way.

    Dee is depicted as asexual within the text although the word is not used. The author has however stated on Twitter that Dee is asexual. The passage below is the one which I see as depicting Dee as asexual. There may be others, but as I was listening to an audiobook, I didn’t take down quotes as I was reading.

    We also get this scene where Dee says she’s not het. I have removed the character names to avoid spoilers.

    As I mentioned before, the narrative never uses the word asexual. There’s also no mention of what Dee’s romantic orientation is, and as far as I know there’s no Word of God on that front. I initially read Dee never using the word to be a sign of how she hasn’t accepted herself. And of course, books don’t have to use the identity label to depict an asexual character. However, I don’t like that other identity labels like gay, bi, and het are used, but ace/asexual never is. Also, how clear is it that Dee is asexual to readers who aren’t asexual themselves? My fear is that her asexuality could be perceived as part of her mental illness. While I don’t believe this was the author’s intentions, I think it is something some readers could come away thinking, especially as the word is never used and Dee’s asexuality is never explicitly separated from her mental health issues. This is of particular concern to me because the asexual community has a problem with people trying to treat our orientation. Ace people seeking mental health treatment for things like anxiety and depression may encounter therapists who seek to treat their sexual orientation. I was incredibly lucky that coming out to my therapist went well, but I know other ace people who have had much worse experiences.

    Dee’s mental health problems stem from her past as a “non-person,” as in this dystopian future homeless people are regularly rounded up and sold into corporate slavery. As a result of that and the death of her parents, Dee is quite traumatized, but she refuses to engage with her emotions. She’s unable to trust others and keeps herself emotionally walled off. In her interior monologue, she berates her inability to engage emotionally and expresses doubt in her own humanity:

    As “trained responses” indicates, Dee’s trust issues and emotional problems are directly tied to the brainwashing procedure corporate slaves undergo (this is called “hothousing”). Other quotes are even clearer in that regard.

    Dee’s own perception of her inhumanity and emotionlessness comes up again in a conversation with Carl, the closest thing she has to a friend:

    As I said before, I don’t think Emma Newman intended for Dee’s mental health issues, the discussions of Dee’s ability to perceive emotions, her coldness, or her trust issues to have any reflection on Dee’s asexuality. However, a lot of the language here is also found in negative stereotypes about asexual people — that we are cold, unable to feel emotions or create meaningful bonds with others, and somehow inhuman. I don’t think that a story about an asexual character who is cold and distant due to trauma and mental health issues is necessarily a bad thing — I think there’s a need for that type of story. But I think that it would need to be handled with a very delicate hand. Ideally, I’d want to see a clear separation between the protagonist’s asexuality and her mental health issues, as well as other asexual characters who are not cold and distant. I would also appreciate a healing arc. In general, I don’t think Atlas Alone sensitively handled the intersection of mental illness and asexuality.

    The rest of my discussion on Atlas Alone and asexual representation involves major spoilers for the ending of the novel. If you want to avoid spoilers, please quit reading now.

    While I don’t think any of this was done out of malice or ill intentions towards asexual people, it still winds up playing into negative stereotypes. Atlas Alone may be a book that some asexual readers want to avoid. However, I also worry about what perception it will give non-asexual readers of asexuality. Since we lack visibility, any one asexual character can have a disproportionate impact and may wind up being one of the only asexual characters a reader has encountered. Within Big Five, traditionally published science fiction and fantasy, I can name only a few books with canonically asexual protagonists. These are Seanan McGuire’s Every Heart a Doorway, Garth Nix’s Clariel, K.A. Doore’s The Perfect Assassin, and Vicious by V.E. Schwab, and Clariel and Vicious also arguably reproduce the same negative stereotypes.

    A lot of times coming out to people involves explaining what my sexual orientation is and having to actively combat these stereotypes. I was originally going to recommend against Atlas Alone just for asexual readers who feel they might be upset by this narrative… but I fear what impressions this book will give people who don’t know any better (which is most people) about asexuality. So I’m reluctant to recommend Atlas Alone at all.

    Again, I don’t think Emma Newman intended any of this, and I do love her work. I really appreciate how this series deals with mental health issues, but at the end of the day, more thought and care should have been put into the depiction of Dee’s asexuality.

  • Jacqie

    Thanks to Netgalley for providing a copy of this book for review.

    I've been reading along with this series ever since Planetfall. Unfortunately, I think this book was my least favorite of the series. And you should know- Atlas 2 and the colonists do NOT meet in this book. There had better be more in this series!!!!!!

    So, each book has explored some sort of psychological issue. In this book, our POV character is Dee. She was a friend of Carl the Investigator (they played immersive games together),

    Thanks to Netgalley for providing a copy of this book for review.

    I've been reading along with this series ever since Planetfall. Unfortunately, I think this book was my least favorite of the series. And you should know- Atlas 2 and the colonists do NOT meet in this book. There had better be more in this series!!!!!!

    So, each book has explored some sort of psychological issue. In this book, our POV character is Dee. She was a friend of Carl the Investigator (they played immersive games together), and he managed to get her onto Atlas 2 before the world blew up. I didn't remember anything about Dee, but you get to know her pretty well in this book.

    Dee's issue is trust. She is a product of hot-housing, just like Carl, and was essentially a corporate slave. It looks like she primarily worked in the entertainment industry doing market and data analysis, because that's part of what she ends up doing in this book. Dee wants to get revenge on whoever blew up the earth, and she's convinced the culprit is on the ship with them. (I don't know why she thinks this; my first assumption was that government-corporations went to total war after Atlas 2 launched). To find this bad guy, Dee needs access to more detailed data than her clearance level warrants, and she gets this clearance through a hand-wavy expedience that doesn't come up in the plot again.

    A lot of this book is spent in an immersive virtual environment. Dee gets hooked into a game and ends up committing a crime, not realizing that her actions would have repercussions in the real world. Dee doesn't have anyone she trusts enough to confess to, so she's on her own with a creepy co-conspirator who only contacts her in virtual space.

    The end of this book is probably the darkest and most hopeless of the series so far, and that's saying a lot. As the author probably intended, I got swept up into Dee's point of view and agreed in principle with her actions but reading them being carried out really bothered me- Dee is borderline anti-social personality disorder and her moral compass is set to what is expedient and won't get her caught. This was well done on the author's part.

    What threw me out of the story: in the immersive VR world, Dee is given very specific cues and touchstones. She sees people that she knew, or maybe only noticed a couple of times without interacting with them. The author tries to justify how specific VR worlds can get with a person's memory cues, but I just wasn't buying it. Here's the real spoiler part:

    It turns out that Dee's co-conspirator is the AI of the ship, which ends up naming itself Atlas Alone. I had seen this coming from a mile away and was just waiting for the reveal. But that still doesn't explain just how specific the AI could be to the basement where Dee had to wait out the early 2030s London riots. There were smell, aural and touch cues. Or how it could know about Dee's last moments with her father. The atmosphere added to the spookiness of the book but I just couldn't believe it- it was too much like magic. There's no way the AI could have had some of the specific data it did.

    However, I still really hope that we get more of this series, because I have to know what happens when all of these characters finally are in the same place!

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.