We're Going to Need More Wine

We're Going to Need More Wine

A powerful collection of essays about gender, sexuality, race, beauty, Hollywood, and what it means to be a modern woman.One month before the release of the highly anticipated film The Birth of a Nation, actress Gabrielle Union shook the world with a vulnerable and impassioned editorial in which she urged our society to have compassion for victims of sexual violence. In the wake of rape awoman.One...

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Title:We're Going to Need More Wine
Author:Gabrielle Union
Rating:
Edition Language:English

We're Going to Need More Wine Reviews

  • Erin

    I love Gabrielle Union!

    I love her movies, I love her show, I loved this book, and I love her as a person.

    Gabrielle or Nickie as her her friends and family know her, has been my friend in my head for years. I obviously don't know her in real life but I've always felt that if I met her I would like her. This book has confirmed it.

    We're Going To Need More Wine is honest, funny as hell, raw, and smart just like the woman herself. This isn't a memoir or autobiography so if that's what i

    I love Gabrielle Union!

    I love her movies, I love her show, I loved this book, and I love her as a person.

    Gabrielle or Nickie as her her friends and family know her, has been my friend in my head for years. I obviously don't know her in real life but I've always felt that if I met her I would like her. This book has confirmed it.

    We're Going To Need More Wine is honest, funny as hell, raw, and smart just like the woman herself. This isn't a memoir or autobiography so if that's what interests you this isn't your book. We're Going To Need More Wine is a collection of essays that touch on pivotal moments in her life. I prefer essays over memoirs, because honestly I don't care about where you we're born or what elementary school you attended unless its a supercool story(its usually not).

    So if you love Gabrielle Union,

    Read this book.

    If you love books written by strong women about strong women,

    Read this book.

    If you just enjoy hilarious and honest storytelling,

    Read this book.

    Basically

    READ THIS BOOK!

  • Michael

    Gabrielle Union had me laughing so loud reading this memoir. I knew that she was a talented actress, but I had no idea that was so funny and had a rough life. Usually when you see people in Hollywood, the perception that you have of them are that they are 'perfect' without flaws. However this book unveiled a lot of things about Union life that I had no prior knowledge of. Things such as being discriminated based on the color of her skin, bullying, and other acts that will have you surprised. I w

    Gabrielle Union had me laughing so loud reading this memoir. I knew that she was a talented actress, but I had no idea that was so funny and had a rough life. Usually when you see people in Hollywood, the perception that you have of them are that they are 'perfect' without flaws. However this book unveiled a lot of things about Union life that I had no prior knowledge of. Things such as being discriminated based on the color of her skin, bullying, and other acts that will have you surprised. I was impressed with how this book read like a conversation with friends. I liked how she was so blunt with her language, never being afraid to use explicit words when necessary.

    There were many highlights in this book, but I don't want to spoil anything. It is a very witty and memorable book that will have you laughing so loud, whether it was intentional or not. I did not really like the ending but because I was immersed in every chapter, I rounded it up to five stars.

    Really good memoir, trust me after reading this, you are going to need more wine!

  • Luvvie

    I just read this whole book in 4 hours in 1 sitting. It was so honest. So vulnerable. So real. Also funny. Could not have been easy to write cuz she really puts herself on the stand. This is so good. Loved it. Gabby did that!

  • Reading in Black & White

    I was kind of surprised by how honest and transparent Gabrielle was in this collection of essays. It is important to note that these are essays so don't expect a full memoir, and with that being said, not all details of her life were given and some things were completely left out. Some essays are hysterical, some are heartbreaking, and others hit close to home. We're Going to Need More Wine is the perfect title as this book touched on a number of topics from growing up black in a predominantly w

    I was kind of surprised by how honest and transparent Gabrielle was in this collection of essays. It is important to note that these are essays so don't expect a full memoir, and with that being said, not all details of her life were given and some things were completely left out. Some essays are hysterical, some are heartbreaking, and others hit close to home. We're Going to Need More Wine is the perfect title as this book touched on a number of topics from growing up black in a predominantly white community, relationships, sex, racism, the pressure of dealing with public perception, friendships, and most importantly, the freedom one can feel when they decide to truly be themselves.

  • Read In Colour

    Very open & honest, Gabrielle Union is not just a pretty face. She's really smart and really funny and now I want to be her BFF.

  • Monica **can't read fast enough**

    Gabrielle Union doesn't hold anything back in this memoir and hearing her experiences in her own voice makes her story even more engaging. I knew very little about Gabrielle's personal life before listening to We're Going to Need More Wine, and she is definitely a woman to admire. She embraces her weaknesses and her strengths and is unapologetic in her honesty. Union addresses sexual assault and how it impacted her into her adulthood and relationships. She addresses the idea of competition and i

    Gabrielle Union doesn't hold anything back in this memoir and hearing her experiences in her own voice makes her story even more engaging. I knew very little about Gabrielle's personal life before listening to We're Going to Need More Wine, and she is definitely a woman to admire. She embraces her weaknesses and her strengths and is unapologetic in her honesty. Union addresses sexual assault and how it impacted her into her adulthood and relationships. She addresses the idea of competition and identity as well as what it takes to survive in the entertainment industry as an African American woman.

    She looks at body image, sexuality, and the notion that if you don't even know your own body, how can you expect to have positive body image or derive any real pleasure from it? Union goes on to tackle what it means to be a successful woman both professionally and personally in American society today. The most surprising aspect of Union's memoir for me is her approach to parenting. She discusses the need to drop 'black bombs' on her step sons for their own safety. Although I am not the mother of boys, I am the mother of two young black women and the way she addresses the need for her boys to behave differently than their white friends in many situations is exceptionally relatable.

    Union delivered so much more than I expected in this honest and forthcoming memoir and with everything that is happening in American society today much of it is reflected in this memoir. It's one that I would recommend to any reader over 18. We're Going To Need More Wine was one of my favorite reads of 2017 for all of the reasons above. If you are interested in reading this one, I highly recommend getting this on audio. Gabrielle Union narrating feels like listening to a friend talk about things that I can relate to personally.

  • Sher❤ The Fabulous BookLover

    *Audiobook Review*

    I’ve never really known what to think of Gabrielle Union. I loved her in Bring it On and Being Mary Jane, but I didn’t know what to think since I've never really been crazy about her. We’re Going To Need More Wine is a collection of stories that are so transparent and real, from stories about infertility, rape to racism and Hollywood. I was surprised by how candid she is. There’s heartbreaking moments, funny moments and moments where you can just relate. Love t

    *Audiobook Review*

    I’ve never really known what to think of Gabrielle Union. I loved her in Bring it On and Being Mary Jane, but I didn’t know what to think since I've never really been crazy about her. We’re Going To Need More Wine is a collection of stories that are so transparent and real, from stories about infertility, rape to racism and Hollywood. I was surprised by how candid she is. There’s heartbreaking moments, funny moments and moments where you can just relate. Love the title, I love cover and it’s definitely plus that she’s the audio narrator. She’s smart, funny, talented and I’m honestly glad I gave this a chance.

  • Holly

    When I think 'Gabrielle Union' I think 'gorgeous woman and talented actress'. This book was not the light fluffy memoir I expected based on my superficial perception, instead it delves into topics such as rape, death, infertility, racism, and divorce. Now, it's not all a downer, there's a good mix of fun in there too to lighten it all up including Prince and some funny high school high jinks. My only complaint, much like with Trevor Noah's Born a Crime, is that there is no insight given into how

    When I think 'Gabrielle Union' I think 'gorgeous woman and talented actress'. This book was not the light fluffy memoir I expected based on my superficial perception, instead it delves into topics such as rape, death, infertility, racism, and divorce. Now, it's not all a downer, there's a good mix of fun in there too to lighten it all up including Prince and some funny high school high jinks. My only complaint, much like with Trevor Noah's Born a Crime, is that there is no insight given into how she went from high school basketball player to famous actress. But then again, I think a Hollywood actress focusing on Hollywood isn't nearly as interesting or insightful as what Union reveals here. This is definitely one of the better 'famous person' memoirs I have read. She narrates the audiobook, and does a fantastic job of it (of course). If she writes anything more, I say 'bring it on' (sorry, couldn't help myself).

  • Lola

    You don’t actually need wine to read this book, but it sure feels as though Gabrielle Union herself is in front of you, at the other end of the table, telling you her life story.

    She comes out as very approachable through her wonderful writing style. She is detailed and precise, and a skilled story-teller. I could picture everything happening clearly in my mind, and the fact that these stories are all true makes them all the more important.

    You see, Gabrielle Union may have grown up i

    You don’t actually need wine to read this book, but it sure feels as though Gabrielle Union herself is in front of you, at the other end of the table, telling you her life story.

    She comes out as very approachable through her wonderful writing style. She is detailed and precise, and a skilled story-teller. I could picture everything happening clearly in my mind, and the fact that these stories are all true makes them all the more important.

    You see, Gabrielle Union may have grown up in an affluent neighbourhood, but that doesn’t mean she hasn’t seen and experienced dark events. In fact, she knew she had to be extra careful and pay extra attention to everything she did and said because the world is harder on people of colour.

    But even knowing this and taking precautions, she still got hurt. She still got taken advantage of. She still had her heart broken. And she still was raped at her workplace.

    You think everyone has it figured out, or you assume that the only things they’ve had to deal with were mildly serious issues. You don’t think something like that could happen to a celebrity, to someone who is loved and admired by many. You don’t think they’ve had to overcome something so… soul-shattering.

    Gabrielle Union did. Now you look at her and you see everything you want to be, but to get to that point she’s had to climb a mountain and dodge a few icebergs. What surprises me most about this memoir are the little details about herself that she so willingly shares with us, like the fact that she first masturbated at the age of five, or how much she wanted to be like the white girls when she was young.

    It is not one hundred percent cohesive, seeing that Ms. Union goes back and forth quite a few times, and the last chapter feels extremely random despite being inspiring, but it is entirely interesting, refreshing and honest.

    I know a lot of people refuse to read memoirs from celebrities, for many reasons that I respect, but if ever you want to give one a chance and are looking for a meaningful read, this is

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  • Brina

    My earliest independent reading memories involve biographies and memoirs. In second grade I got to take home a rolled up timeline because I read the most biographies of anyone in my class. There are large volumes that require much of my time, but in the last few months I have noticed that celebrity written memoirs have replaced mysteries as my go to genre that I enjoy in between denser reads. I enjoy reading about the person away from the glitz and the glamor and find out what he or she is about

    My earliest independent reading memories involve biographies and memoirs. In second grade I got to take home a rolled up timeline because I read the most biographies of anyone in my class. There are large volumes that require much of my time, but in the last few months I have noticed that celebrity written memoirs have replaced mysteries as my go to genre that I enjoy in between denser reads. I enjoy reading about the person away from the glitz and the glamor and find out what he or she is about in real life. One of the members of the nonfiction book club had mentioned reading We’re Going to Need More Wine, and my curiosity was whetted. I follow both the author and her husband on social media, so with this recommendation in hand, I ventured to discover the Gabrielle Union off camera.

    Gabrielle Union is the current title character of Being Mary Jane, a devoted wife, stepmother, and mother, and a spokesperson for rape and domestic abuse victims as well as for the Susan G Komen Breast Cancer Awareness Fund. One could say that she has cracked the mythical glass ceiling and has it made, but she came from humble roots and still appears at least on paper to be the same person after achieving fame and fortune. Union, who went by the moniker Nickie, grew up in the predominately white town of Pleasanton, California. She could count on both hands the number of people of color in her inner circles of friends, and at a certain point, she ceased to be “black” to her white friends because she acted “normal.” To counter becoming too white, Union spent her teenage summer vacations at her maternal grandmother’s home in North Omaha, Nebraska. There she stayed on the cutting edge of African American culture, yet also came face to face with the gang membership and drug usage plaguing the teens of her community. Determined not to be another statistic, the summer visits eventually stopped but not before Union saw the schism between black and white teens for herself.

    Union openly tells readers about her trials and tribulations of adolescence: her changing body, dating, both the relationships she had as well as encouraging safe intercourse for teenagers. The event that she would not let her define herself by occurred on a summer home from college working at a Payless Shoes store. One night, she was raped, leading to years of post traumatic stress and therapy. Rather than becoming known as a victim, Union uses every speaking opportunity she has to speak out against rape and encourages survivors to report the violence to police as well as seek treatment for themselves. Although Union did discover much later the importance of advocating for herself first, she has through her platform advised women to look out for themselves first, which is noble in her role as both an advocate and mentor.

    As a member of black Hollywood, Union moves in rarefied air. She got her break in movies “Ten Things I Hate About You” and “Bring It On.” Both movies are considered cult classics today, especially Bring It On, about rival high school cheerleading squads vying for a state championship trophy, which I admit to watching many times the year it came out. These movies, however, were primarily for white audiences; mainstream Hollywood remains a lily white community. For black actors and actresses to achieve, Union advocates mentorship, leading to more roles and leadership positions for people who look like them. Judging from the recent success of films like “If Beale Street Could Talk” and “Green Book,” it seems as though the members of Union’s Hollywood circle have empowered a younger generation of actors to achieve more than stardom in black cult movies. Hopefully, that divide will crack more in coming years as Hollywood becomes more and more color blind.

    Today Union and basketball player Dwayne Wade make up a power couple visible to millions on social media circles. This was not always the case for either of them as they both suffered through messy first marriages and a myriad of bad relationships before finding each as soul mates. In her role as a stepmother to black teenagers, Union has advised her boys how to navigate America, even as much as quoting Ta-Nahisi Coates’ “Between the World and Me” to the boys’ school principal in an attempt to have him see the world from her shoes. Even though Union and Wade and their children are in the public eye, they are still African American. While many are color blind, unfortunately, there are many people in this world who are not color blind to crime. Yet, the Union-Wade family is doing their part to help break down these barriers.

    After years of failed fertility treatments, Gabrielle Union is now a proud mother to Kaavia James Wade. If you have seen her pictures on social media, she is a cute one, and her mother and father are doting parents. With crazy schedules and social media watching their every move, Union and Wade both try to stay as grounded as possible. From the outside looking in, this seems evident to me by the way they are raising their children to advocate for themselves, to be aware of themselves as African American males growing up in the United States. Union has taken her Hollywood platform to great heights as an advocate, mentor, and spokesperson for various causes. It has been eye opening and enlightening to read her memoir, and I wish her nothing but the best in the years to come.

    4 stars

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