The New Right: A Journey to the Fringe of American Politics

The New Right: A Journey to the Fringe of American Politics

The definitive firsthand account of the movement that permanently broke the American political consensus.What do internet trolls, economic populists, white nationalists, techno-anarchists and Alex Jones have in common? Nothing, except for an unremitting hatred of evangelical progressivism and the so-called "Cathedral" from whence it pours forth.Contrary to the dissembling...

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Title:The New Right: A Journey to the Fringe of American Politics
Author:Michael Malice
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The New Right: A Journey to the Fringe of American Politics Reviews

  • Will

    This is one of the best books I have seen that really drives into the current political discourse.(without being a hit piece of course) He does an amazing job of breaking the entire history (from the beginning of the current movement) and current events and provides great detail without being overbearing and boring. For those that have not been paying attention to what has been going on, in reference to the shaping of the political landscape, this book hits the nail on the head. He does not hold

    This is one of the best books I have seen that really drives into the current political discourse.(without being a hit piece of course) He does an amazing job of breaking the entire history (from the beginning of the current movement) and current events and provides great detail without being overbearing and boring. For those that have not been paying attention to what has been going on, in reference to the shaping of the political landscape, this book hits the nail on the head. He does not hold out on any info. A lot of this I was already privy to but some of this was new info that helped to print an even better picture.

    I have Michael's other book (Dear Reader) but I have not read it yet. If that book is anything like this one, and I'm sure it is, i cant wait to read it. He has done an amazing job here.

    I would recommend this to those that have shown they really want to know what's truly going on. Not those that wanna repeat catchy phrases.

    I would have completed this book sooner but i didnt take it everywhere because I didnt want to mess it up haha.

  • Noah Mickel

    Incredible. Please read.

  • Wesley Kushner

    Written for those who get it and those who don't, Malice combines philosophy, history, memoir, and personality in this road trip through not just the edge of Polite Society but the badlands beyond it, the common through line being an opposition to progressivism.

    Each chapter falls deeper through the circles of Hell, the previous being a primer for what's coming next. Always empathetic without being sympathetic or pandering, Malice takes on several levels of right-wing thought with care, considera

    Written for those who get it and those who don't, Malice combines philosophy, history, memoir, and personality in this road trip through not just the edge of Polite Society but the badlands beyond it, the common through line being an opposition to progressivism.

    Each chapter falls deeper through the circles of Hell, the previous being a primer for what's coming next. Always empathetic without being sympathetic or pandering, Malice takes on several levels of right-wing thought with care, consideration, and entertainment.

    While the book never loses sight of who the real villains are, Malice also doesn't treat the subjects of this book with kid gloves. He takes them at their word but in doing so he is able to disassemble their arguments and argue against them in a concise and humorous manner.

    I highly recommend this to anyone interested in the New Right, anyone apart of the New Right, and also anyone who wants to fight against the New Right.

  • Bryce Eickholt

    This book was so good, I created a second account to give it 6 out of 5 stars. 5 on this one. 1 on the other.

    It really clears up a lot of misunderstandings and for the most part lets the reader come to his own conclusions.

    It is packed with info and is quite an engaging, fun read. I didn't want to put it down. Can't wait for the sequel.

  • Jonathan

    The current Establishment/Elite/Ruling Class in the United States is a Progressivism one. Many belief this Elite to have come to power in recent times, perhaps under the Obama era. However, as Michael Malice argues in this book, Progressivism has been driving the bus since the late 19th Century.

    They did this by taking control of the American universities, where they foresaw new ideas and policies would be created in these institutions to effect change in society. These ideas and policies were to

    The current Establishment/Elite/Ruling Class in the United States is a Progressivism one. Many belief this Elite to have come to power in recent times, perhaps under the Obama era. However, as Michael Malice argues in this book, Progressivism has been driving the bus since the late 19th Century.

    They did this by taking control of the American universities, where they foresaw new ideas and policies would be created in these institutions to effect change in society. These ideas and policies were to be distributed out to the masses via other arms of the education system and mass media. The Progressives also saw the universities as grounds to produce a self-perpetuating elite to engineer every aspect of American society via an Administriative State. This Administrative State would fully come into power with the election of Woodrow Wilson.

    Under this Administrative State, the United States changed from a Classical Liberal country, one of limited government, free market economics, inalienable individual rights and a isolationist foreign policy to a country of limitless government, Corporatist/Fascist economics, the complete disregard for individual rights and an interventionist foreign policy.

    Attempts to take back control from the Progressives were made by The Right (now known as the Old Right) during the first half of the 20th Century, however they failed and the Progressive influence grew under figures such as FDR, who continued the legacy of Wilson.

    A second attempt was made in the middle of the 20th century. These individuals were known as The New Right. It was broad coalition of schools of thought, such as: Murray Rothbard and the Anarchists; Ayn Rand and the Objectivists; William F. Buckley and the Moderate Conservatives/ex-Trotskyists, who would become the Neoconservatives (Necons); and Barry Goldwater and the Libertarians.

    The movement failed however, largely because Buckley and the Neocons purged the others (they were ex-Communists after all) and hijacked the movement. Buckley and his cronies at National Review, would come to define The Right in America for the rest of the century and early parts of the 21st Century. Conceding ground at all turns on important issues, trying to take the moral high ground and play by the rules against opposition that has no morals and does not play by the rules. In other words, as the author would put it: "Conservatism is Progressivism driving the speed limit".

    With the rise of the internet and Social Media, the population has access to more information than anytime in human history. This has fueled the rise of a New "New Right", which the author defines as:

    "A loosely connected group of individuals united by their opposition to progressivism, which they perceive to be a thinly veiled fundamentalist religion dedicated to egalitarian principles and intent on totalitarian world domination via globalist hegemony."

    The "New Right" has has gained more mainstream attention in the wake of the Trump election and the Media's obsession with the "Alt-Right". But do not be confused by the hysteria of the Media, this movement is not solely about the Economic Nationalism of Trump, or the Identity Politics of the White Nationalist "Alt-right", and quite frankly, they are both the least interesting aspects of this phenomenon.

    This movement is NOT a monolith and is big tent of groups and individuals, many who disagree on virtually everything and some even despise one another. Some of these groups include, but not limited to are: Traditional Conservatives, Monarchists, Minarchists/Libertarians, Objectivists, Anarchists, Techno-Anarchists, Paleoconservatives, Paleolibertarians, Autocrats and Technocrats.

    There are many other groups and individuals, who are mentioned in the book and not mentioned, who are not defined by the author as "New Right", but do who are arguably allied or have some overlap with The "New Right", such as Classical Liberals, refugees of the Democratic party, The Pick Artist Community, MGTOW (Men Go Their Own Way), Manosphere community, figures such as: Jordan Peterson, Joe Rogan and Dave Rubin, and quite frankly, anyone that disagrees or challenges the Progressive elite.

    How the "New Right" differs from the current Establishment Conservatives, is they are far more concerned with culture than politics. They understand that "politics is downstream for culture" as Andrew Breitbart would say. In other words, you must change culture to change politics.

    They also understand how culture is created, often on the fringes of society. Punk Rock, Hip-Hop and Drag Queen culture were all once niche cultures on the fringe of society and are now recognised as mainstream in culture. Where culture is being created today is on the internet and The "New Right" has managed to tap into in this, particularly on Youtube, a platform it dominates with large audiences, often made up of people between the ages of 16 to 30. This is not only threating the Progressives bottom line, as more and more people are turning away from Old Media and also New Media platforms backed by Old Media such as: Vice and Vox, but it is also threats the future of their dominates as an ideology in society.

    They also recognise that Progressivism ultimately does not want to co-exist with any other ideology and will not stop until everything that isn't Progressivism is destroyed, because of this, "New Right" are not willing to concede ground on anything and in most cases, are not interested in civil discourse, as it is ultimately impossible.

    The book is written from the first person perspective of the author, Michael Malice, as he navigates his way through what the "New Right" is. Whilst the movement is like the "Tea Party and "Occupy" movements, which had no clear leaders, the "New Right" does have personalities. Malice does not really explore these personalities, but uses them as a jumping off point to explore the ideas and beliefs of this movement and the origins of these ideas and beliefs.

    It's basically a "101" guide to these ideas and beliefs, so those more familiar with the ideas, or those looking for more of a book focused on the personalities might be disappointed. Regardless through, it's a light and humorous read, but yet is well researched and gives some legitimate analysis to something culturally significant that has been happening the last few years, which as been overlooked by the mainstream, partly on purpose and partly because of lack of understanding, for one reason or another.

    If want to know what "The Right" actual means, it's history, it's beliefs, the context of the Trump election and understand the current political and cultural divide in America, but also understand Brexit, the EU elections, the election of Bolsonaro and the political and cultural divide across the West, you must read or listen to this book.

  • Shane Hawk

    Malice is the kingtroll of Twitter.

    His writing is both lucid and erudite.

    This book serves as an excellent primer for anyone not savvy to the multilayered right-wing phenomenon that had been brewing during Obama’s second term and burst onto the scene when Trump gained momentum in early 2016.

    Those who follow his work will be familiar with much of this book’s content but become pleasantly surprised here and there. He often reminds us that "the right-wing (or left-wing) is not a monolith.” In this c

    Malice is the kingtroll of Twitter.

    His writing is both lucid and erudite.

    This book serves as an excellent primer for anyone not savvy to the multilayered right-wing phenomenon that had been brewing during Obama’s second term and burst onto the scene when Trump gained momentum in early 2016.

    Those who follow his work will be familiar with much of this book’s content but become pleasantly surprised here and there. He often reminds us that "the right-wing (or left-wing) is not a monolith.” In this case, Malice explores the many flavors confined within the New Right umbrella to show it is not purely a gang of tiki-torch-wielding racists and freaks.

    His definition of the New Right:

    He includes interviews and memorable interactions with those loosely and tightly associated with the New Right. Malice affords them a platform to speak their truth and does not hold back on picking apart their arguments or world views. One can notice the book's pattern in which the New Right views get more foolish and objectionable with every following chapter. Still, Malice shows many of these thinkers are not merely bumbling rubes, but rather educated people with despicable worldviews.

    The following people (and their ideas, work, etc.) are mentioned in the book albeit some more than others, but not all are included under the New Right moniker: Thomas Sowell, Milton Friedman, Murray Rothbard, David Duke, Albert Camus, Donald Trump, Richard Spencer, Ayn Rand, Lysander Spooner, George Stigler, Superman, Ron Paul, Justin Raimondo, Hans-Hermann Hoppe, Mencius Moldbug, Jeb Bush, Judith Rich Harris, David Lynch, Alexander Hamilton, Pat Buchanan, Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, Mao, the hacker known as 4chan, his brother 8chan, Rosie O’Donnell, Ludwig von Mises, Andrew Napolitano, Richard Nixon, William F. Buckley, Christopher Cantwell, Vox Day, Jonathan Haidt, James Burnham, Arthur Herman, Andrew Breitbart, Ann Coulter, Gavin McInnes, Jim Goad, Batman, Shannon Sullivan, Cody Wilson, Thomas C. Leonard, Jim Acosta, Scott Adams, Ryan Holiday, Jared Taylor, James Alefantis, Radley Balko, Steve Bannon, Owen Benjamin, Milo Yiannopoulos, Ross Ulbricht, Jessica Valenti, Georges Sorel, Ben Shapiro, Joe Rogan, Mike Cernovich, Charlie Nash, H. L. Mencken, and many more.

  • Ryan Schmitt

    Michael Malice has integrated a considerable amount of information in this insightful survey of the New Right, the sociopolitical movement which he carefully defines as "a loosely connected group of individuals united by their opposition to progressivism, which they perceive to be a thinly veiled fundamentalist religion dedicated to egalitarian principles and intent on totalitarian world domination via globalist hegemony." Malice's extensive personal network within the New Right, as well as his

    Michael Malice has integrated a considerable amount of information in this insightful survey of the New Right, the sociopolitical movement which he carefully defines as "a loosely connected group of individuals united by their opposition to progressivism, which they perceive to be a thinly veiled fundamentalist religion dedicated to egalitarian principles and intent on totalitarian world domination via globalist hegemony." Malice's extensive personal network within the New Right, as well as his encyclopedic knowledge of politics, allow him to present an authoritative and even-handed treatment of this inchoate movement.

    Malice locates the origin of the New Right in the early '90s alliance between paleolibertarians (represented by anarcho-capitalist Murray Rothbard) and paleoconservatives (represented by traditionalist conservative Pat Buchanan). The influence of these two figures can be seen to this day: the New Right's emphasis on trolling and its irreverent tone of disdain towards authority and elite institutions in all their forms is all Rothbard, while the protectionist, America-first, culturally conservative, and at times explicitly racial worldview is traced back to Buchanan. Then as now, the very hegemony of progressivism is what causes these distinct groups to form an alliance against progressivism; it is why the New Right is primarily a reaction against progressivism.

    Although the subject of this book is the New Right, it is at its strongest when characterizing what Malice calls the "evangelical left" (or "evangelical progressivism"), as well as its university-media-government complex (the "Cathedral"), whose narrative authority and ideological dominance are now being seriously challenged by the New Right. Malice's analysis of the evangelical left is woven throughout the book; he consistently applies a religious analytical framework in order to understand the evangelical left, invoking concepts like heresy, original sin, salvation, and grace in order to understand their actions, motivations, intentions, reactions, and thought processes. I'm a sucker for this analytical approach, especially since reading Yuri Slezkine's magisterial

    , and I really do think there is ample justification for it: as Malice shows, this strain of left-progressivism has its roots in the explicitly religious (specifically, postmillennial Christian) "social gospel" movement of the late 19th/early 20th century.

    I have to admit that I was disappointed with the quality of the writing, or rather the editing. Malice knows which points he wants to make and how best to make them (as his Twitter account will show), but despite his mastery of epigrams he seems to struggle with structure in long-form writing. Paragraphs occasionally consist of two or even three unrelated thoughts strung together; he changes topics out of nowhere (there are no section breaks or headings in the book), and sometimes he even seems to forget what he was talking about.

    For example, on p. 150, he begins a paragraph with: "The Proud Boys' gender exclusivity speaks to two things." He goes on to tell us the first thing, but then forgets the second thing altogether, jarringly changing the topic to the New Right's stance on free speech. And then there's chapter 13 ("The New Hwite"), the most tedious chapter in the book, whose excessive editorializing reads like an imaginary argument and gets in the way of understanding the subject of the chapter.

    For those who still care about this sort of thing, it's worth noting that the physical quality of the hardcover version is quite poor. The paper and binding are both cheap, and the use of non-acid-free paper means the pages will turn yellow and brittle with age. Not a deal-breaker for most people, but you're not exactly getting your money's worth either.

    Overall, I recommend this book for its wealth of insights and the evenness of its analysis.

  • Ben Kramer

    Michael Malice will definitively spoil whatever pleasant delusion you may have about the new right. From a left perspective, it could be the idea that the movement wholly consists of nonintellectual, immoral, social outcasts living in their parents' basements. From the right, it's that, to the extent it exists at all, the new right is just a small, disunited assortment of provocateurs whose importance is being magnified by the media. For almost all of us, it's to simply write these people off as

    Michael Malice will definitively spoil whatever pleasant delusion you may have about the new right. From a left perspective, it could be the idea that the movement wholly consists of nonintellectual, immoral, social outcasts living in their parents' basements. From the right, it's that, to the extent it exists at all, the new right is just a small, disunited assortment of provocateurs whose importance is being magnified by the media. For almost all of us, it's to simply write these people off as crazy. Simply put, it's uncomfortable to have these delusions very reasonably disproved.

    However, as it quickly becomes clear, there is tremendous risk in not taking the new right seriously enough (or in considering their ideas so heretical that entertaining them long enough to construct an intellectual challenge is immoral). Effectively, we are fueling a violently dangerous and internally contradictory movement built on certain unspeakable (and therefore, unthinkable) truths.

    Regardless of ideology, there is no one who will find this book comfortable, beyond the clear thinking and humorous writing style. This is all the more reason why anyone genuinely trying to understand the current political environment should put this at the top of their list.

  • Shane

    A fun and interesting read. Malice starts with ancient history (the 1980's) and the crossing and diverging paths of Ayn Rand, Murray Rothbard, and Pat Buchanan. It then dives into first person accounts of modern voices in both the heart and fringes of today's "New Right"

    The first person account and Malice's humor and wit make the last half of the book just fly by. I wish there was a larger sampling of the different facets represented but I understand that as a first person telling it is limited

    A fun and interesting read. Malice starts with ancient history (the 1980's) and the crossing and diverging paths of Ayn Rand, Murray Rothbard, and Pat Buchanan. It then dives into first person accounts of modern voices in both the heart and fringes of today's "New Right"

    The first person account and Malice's humor and wit make the last half of the book just fly by. I wish there was a larger sampling of the different facets represented but I understand that as a first person telling it is limited by the authors contacts and experience.

    That would be my only complaint is that the book seemed too short by far. There could be a whole second volume just flushing out all the details. Maybe someday.

  • Slavisa

    I do not understand why this book is so highly esteemed by other reviewers. The first quarter, about the emergence and formation of the New Right from various strands of thought, is the most interesting part. The rest of the book, however, generally retells a number of recent media-related events and describes several more or less well-known figures prominent in the new right (Coulter, Cernovich, Milo, etc.). It would make an interesting and engaging overview if you had slept over the past five

    I do not understand why this book is so highly esteemed by other reviewers. The first quarter, about the emergence and formation of the New Right from various strands of thought, is the most interesting part. The rest of the book, however, generally retells a number of recent media-related events and describes several more or less well-known figures prominent in the new right (Coulter, Cernovich, Milo, etc.). It would make an interesting and engaging overview if you had slept over the past five years and missed everything. But if you had paid any attention, even if you followed politics in the media only superficially as I did, there is nothing truly novel or original here.

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