The New Right: A Journey to the Fringe of American Politics

The New Right: A Journey to the Fringe of American Politics

The definitive firsthand account of the movement that permanently broke the American political consensus.What do internet trolls, economic populists, white nationalists, techno-anarchists and Alex Jones have in common? Nothing, except for an unremitting hatred of evangelical progressivism and the so-called "Cathedral" from whence it pours forth.Contrary to the dissembling...

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Title:The New Right: A Journey to the Fringe of American Politics
Author:Michael Malice
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The New Right: A Journey to the Fringe of American Politics Reviews

  • Boris Tsipenyuk

    “The New Right” is an excellent overview of the history and beliefs of disparate elements in the American new right. Written in the first person, The Dear Writer talks about his personal experiences interacting with various personalities as well as their backgrounds and philosophical underpinnings. This tome also discusses at lengths the deep flaws of the conservative movement in the modern era as well as many of the pernicious elements of progressive-ism against which it is supposed to be a cou

    “The New Right” is an excellent overview of the history and beliefs of disparate elements in the American new right. Written in the first person, The Dear Writer talks about his personal experiences interacting with various personalities as well as their backgrounds and philosophical underpinnings. This tome also discusses at lengths the deep flaws of the conservative movement in the modern era as well as many of the pernicious elements of progressive-ism against which it is supposed to be a counterweight, Be certain to also read Dear Reader (For both audio book is recommended) as well as Michael Malice’s programs on compound media and gas digital.

  • Will

    This is one of the best books I have seen that really drives into the current political discourse.(without being a hit piece of course) He does an amazing job of breaking the entire history (from the beginning of the current movement) and current events and provides great detail without being overbearing and boring. For those that have not been paying attention to what has been going on, in reference to the shaping of the political landscape, this book hits the nail on the head. He does not hold

    This is one of the best books I have seen that really drives into the current political discourse.(without being a hit piece of course) He does an amazing job of breaking the entire history (from the beginning of the current movement) and current events and provides great detail without being overbearing and boring. For those that have not been paying attention to what has been going on, in reference to the shaping of the political landscape, this book hits the nail on the head. He does not hold out on any info. A lot of this I was already privy to but some of this was new info that helped to print an even better picture.

    I have Michael's other book (Dear Reader) but I have not read it yet. If that book is anything like this one, and I'm sure it is, i cant wait to read it. He has done an amazing job here.

    I would recommend this to those that have shown they really want to know what's truly going on. Not those that wanna repeat catchy phrases.

    I would have completed this book sooner but i didnt take it everywhere because I didnt want to mess it up haha.

  • Wesley Kushner

    Written for those who get it and those who don't, Malice combines philosophy, history, memoir, and personality in this road trip through not just the edge of Polite Society but the badlands beyond it, the common through line being an opposition to progressivism.

    Each chapter falls deeper through the circles of Hell, the previous being a primer for what's coming next. Always empathetic without being sympathetic or pandering, Malice takes on several levels of right-wing thought with care, considera

    Written for those who get it and those who don't, Malice combines philosophy, history, memoir, and personality in this road trip through not just the edge of Polite Society but the badlands beyond it, the common through line being an opposition to progressivism.

    Each chapter falls deeper through the circles of Hell, the previous being a primer for what's coming next. Always empathetic without being sympathetic or pandering, Malice takes on several levels of right-wing thought with care, consideration, and entertainment.

    While the book never loses sight of who the real villains are, Malice also doesn't treat the subjects of this book with kid gloves. He takes them at their word but in doing so he is able to disassemble their arguments and argue against them in a concise and humorous manner.

    I highly recommend this to anyone interested in the New Right, anyone apart of the New Right, and also anyone who wants to fight against the New Right.

  • Matt

    A fascinating and entertaining narrative of the rise of the new ethos emerging from the American political right.

    It's difficult to imagine enjoying a book that describes a constellation of ideas that I find disagreeable, reprehensible and far too powerful in America.

    But if you want to do something about bad ideas, understanding them is crucial and this book does an excellent job of explaining those ideas.

    This book isn't for everyone so reader beware, but I found it very helpful.

  • ZaibatsuRandom

    First of all, I must say I really enjoyed the book. I've followed Malice on Twitter for a while and never quite understood his Anarchist shtick. But after reading through this I now have a much better understanding. First of all, I'd like to make a comparison to another book that attempted to bring the esoteric world of a group that is, not always accurately, described as right wing. I read

    's book

    First of all, I must say I really enjoyed the book. I've followed Malice on Twitter for a while and never quite understood his Anarchist shtick. But after reading through this I now have a much better understanding. First of all, I'd like to make a comparison to another book that attempted to bring the esoteric world of a group that is, not always accurately, described as right wing. I read

    's book

    which tried to do, unsuccessfully, what Malice managed to do here. Nagle's was, unfortunately, unable to extract her own personal biases from her treatment of the trolls and sh!tposters, without honestly declaring them. Malice doesn't suffer from that mistake. He's very honest and upfront about his point of view and luckily that includes a fearless commitment to free speech without judgement.

    I might not agree with all his statements and conclusions, but it's a fascinating read, well written and flows really well. Even some of the more cringeworthy interviews (some of the interviewees are not what I'd call sympathetic) are informative and give agency when the current standard is to deplatform.

    I plan on recommending it to some of my more progressive friends who might benefit from being able to see things from a completely different point of view. I know I certainly got an eye opening view that has changed my mind on a couple issues.

  • Shane Hawk

    Malice is the kingtroll of Twitter.

    His writing is both lucid and erudite.

    This book serves as an excellent primer for anyone not savvy to the multilayered right-wing phenomenon that had been brewing during Obama’s second term and burst onto the scene when Trump gained momentum in early 2016.

    Those who follow his work will be familiar with much of this book’s content but become pleasantly surprised here and there. He often reminds us that "the right-wing (or left-wing) is not a monolith.” In this c

    Malice is the kingtroll of Twitter.

    His writing is both lucid and erudite.

    This book serves as an excellent primer for anyone not savvy to the multilayered right-wing phenomenon that had been brewing during Obama’s second term and burst onto the scene when Trump gained momentum in early 2016.

    Those who follow his work will be familiar with much of this book’s content but become pleasantly surprised here and there. He often reminds us that "the right-wing (or left-wing) is not a monolith.” In this case, Malice explores the many flavors confined within the New Right umbrella to show it is not purely a gang of tiki-torch-wielding racists and freaks.

    His definition of the New Right:

    He includes interviews and memorable interactions with those loosely and tightly associated with the New Right. Malice affords them a platform to speak their truth and does not hold back on picking apart their arguments or world views. One can notice the book's pattern in which the New Right views get more foolish and objectionable with every following chapter. Still, Malice shows many of these thinkers are not merely bumbling rubes, but rather educated people with despicable worldviews.

    The following people (and their ideas, work, etc.) are mentioned in the book albeit some more than others, but not all are included under the New Right moniker: Thomas Sowell, Milton Friedman, Murray Rothbard, David Duke, Albert Camus, Donald Trump, Richard Spencer, Ayn Rand, Lysander Spooner, George Stigler, Superman, Ron Paul, Justin Raimondo, Hans-Hermann Hoppe, Mencius Moldbug, Jeb Bush, Judith Rich Harris, David Lynch, Alexander Hamilton, Pat Buchanan, Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, Mao, the hacker known as 4chan, his brother 8chan, Rosie O’Donnell, Ludwig von Mises, Andrew Napolitano, Richard Nixon, William F. Buckley, Christopher Cantwell, Vox Day, Jonathan Haidt, James Burnham, Arthur Herman, Andrew Breitbart, Ann Coulter, Gavin McInnes, Jim Goad, Batman, Shannon Sullivan, Cody Wilson, Thomas C. Leonard, Jim Acosta, Scott Adams, Ryan Holiday, Jared Taylor, James Alefantis, Radley Balko, Steve Bannon, Owen Benjamin, Milo Yiannopoulos, Ross Ulbricht, Jessica Valenti, Georges Sorel, Ben Shapiro, Joe Rogan, Mike Cernovich, Charlie Nash, H. L. Mencken, and many more.

  • Mike

    What is "The New Right"? The author defines it as:

    Interesting book that takes you too the fringe of politics, the sort of fringe you don't dare ask your friends about at a dinner party. The sort of fringe you don't even want to Google for fe

    What is "The New Right"? The author defines it as:

    Interesting book that takes you too the fringe of politics, the sort of fringe you don't dare ask your friends about at a dinner party. The sort of fringe you don't even want to Google for fear of being flagged by whatever Skynet Overlord is watching you. The kind of fringe you may have stumbled into when reading comments on a Facebook post - and couldn't tell if the person was troubled or a troll.

    I've been thinking about where these "scary" ideas come from ever since the 2016 election. I anecdotally think these fringe ideas are so small as to have little effect on wider discourse or culture. I find them all, on their face, to be crazy, but can't help shaking the eerie feeling that the progressives driving off the cliff is pushing young, lost, and ignorant souls into the "scary" place. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction, or whatever. Science.

    The author is funny, and I found the book really easy to digest. I probably fundamentally disagree with him in almost every conceivable issue - but if you're trying to understand the fringes of politics, this is a good place to start. One thing I do agree with him on is any idea, no matter how crazy or scary it's painted to be in culture, needs to be understood and confronted head-on. Good ideas win in the war of ideas. A lot of the ideas the author exposes in this book are really bad ideas, but I'm not sure fearing them, or stomping them out, or treating them like some boogeyman is the best approach to soundly defeating them.

    We live in an absurdly stupid world. Enjoy the ride.

  • Ryan Schmitt

    Michael Malice has integrated a considerable amount of information in this insightful survey of the New Right, the sociopolitical movement which he carefully defines as "a loosely connected group of individuals united by their opposition to progressivism, which they perceive to be a thinly veiled fundamentalist religion dedicated to egalitarian principles and intent on totalitarian world domination via globalist hegemony." Malice's extensive personal network within the New Right, as well as his

    Michael Malice has integrated a considerable amount of information in this insightful survey of the New Right, the sociopolitical movement which he carefully defines as "a loosely connected group of individuals united by their opposition to progressivism, which they perceive to be a thinly veiled fundamentalist religion dedicated to egalitarian principles and intent on totalitarian world domination via globalist hegemony." Malice's extensive personal network within the New Right, as well as his encyclopedic knowledge of politics, allow him to present an authoritative and even-handed treatment of this inchoate movement.

    Malice locates the origin of the New Right in the early '90s alliance between paleolibertarians (represented by anarcho-capitalist Murray Rothbard) and paleoconservatives (represented by traditionalist conservative Pat Buchanan). The influence of these two figures can be seen to this day: the New Right's emphasis on trolling and its irreverent tone of disdain towards authority and elite institutions in all their forms is all Rothbard, while the protectionist, America-first, culturally conservative, and at times explicitly racial worldview is traced back to Buchanan. Then as now, the very hegemony of progressivism is what causes these distinct groups to form an alliance against progressivism; it is why the New Right is primarily a reaction against progressivism.

    Although the subject of this book is the New Right, it is at its strongest when characterizing what Malice calls the "evangelical left" (or "evangelical progressivism"), as well as its university-media-government complex (the "Cathedral"), whose narrative authority and ideological dominance are now being seriously challenged by the New Right. Malice's analysis of the evangelical left is woven throughout the book; he consistently applies a religious analytical framework in order to understand the evangelical left, invoking concepts like heresy, original sin, salvation, and grace in order to understand their actions, motivations, intentions, reactions, and thought processes. I'm a sucker for this analytical approach, especially since reading Yuri Slezkine's magisterial

    , and I really do think there is ample justification for it: as Malice shows, this strain of left-progressivism has its roots in the explicitly religious (specifically, postmillennial Christian) "social gospel" movement of the late 19th/early 20th century.

    I have to admit that I was disappointed with the quality of the writing, or rather the editing. Malice knows which points he wants to make and how best to make them (as his Twitter account will show), but despite his mastery of epigrams he seems to struggle with structure in long-form writing. Paragraphs occasionally consist of two or even three unrelated thoughts strung together; he changes topics out of nowhere (there are no section breaks or headings in the book), and sometimes he even seems to forget what he was talking about.

    For example, on p. 150, he begins a paragraph with: "The Proud Boys' gender exclusivity speaks to two things." He goes on to tell us the first thing, but then forgets the second thing altogether, jarringly changing the topic to the New Right's stance on free speech. And then there's chapter 13 ("The New Hwite"), the most tedious chapter in the book, whose excessive editorializing reads like an imaginary argument and gets in the way of understanding the subject of the chapter.

    For those who still care about this sort of thing, it's worth noting that the physical quality of the hardcover version is quite poor. The paper and binding are both cheap, and the use of non-acid-free paper means the pages will turn yellow and brittle with age. Not a deal-breaker for most people, but you're not exactly getting your money's worth either.

    Overall, I recommend this book for its wealth of insights and the evenness of its analysis.

  • Ben Kramer

    Michael Malice will definitively spoil whatever pleasant delusion you may have about the new right. From a left perspective, it could be the idea that the movement wholly consists of nonintellectual, immoral, social outcasts living in their parents' basements. From the right, it's that, to the extent it exists at all, the new right is just a small, disunited assortment of provocateurs whose importance is being magnified by the media. For almost all of us, it's to simply write these people off as

    Michael Malice will definitively spoil whatever pleasant delusion you may have about the new right. From a left perspective, it could be the idea that the movement wholly consists of nonintellectual, immoral, social outcasts living in their parents' basements. From the right, it's that, to the extent it exists at all, the new right is just a small, disunited assortment of provocateurs whose importance is being magnified by the media. For almost all of us, it's to simply write these people off as crazy. Simply put, it's uncomfortable to have these delusions very reasonably disproved.

    However, as it quickly becomes clear, there is tremendous risk in not taking the new right seriously enough (or in considering their ideas so heretical that entertaining them long enough to construct an intellectual challenge is immoral). Effectively, we are fueling a violently dangerous and internally contradictory movement built on certain unspeakable (and therefore, unthinkable) truths.

    Regardless of ideology, there is no one who will find this book comfortable, beyond the clear thinking and humorous writing style. This is all the more reason why anyone genuinely trying to understand the current political environment should put this at the top of their list.

  • Gareth

    I enjoyed listening to Malice's account of dealing with people giving political opinions so different from those I tend to hear. I also found his presentation and analysis of those ideas to be quite interesting. Maybe I would have rated higher if so much of it was not a recap to me of what I already knew, though some of the parts on the subjects that were newer to me did not seem to stick. I sometimes felt like I missed some major points or themes during the weaving between subjects. Maybe these

    I enjoyed listening to Malice's account of dealing with people giving political opinions so different from those I tend to hear. I also found his presentation and analysis of those ideas to be quite interesting. Maybe I would have rated higher if so much of it was not a recap to me of what I already knew, though some of the parts on the subjects that were newer to me did not seem to stick. I sometimes felt like I missed some major points or themes during the weaving between subjects. Maybe these were more failings on my part than the book's, though.

    Anyway, here is a summary of the book as understand it. Malice categorizes someone as "New Right" if they (1) see some form of progressivism as a fundamentalist religion whose adherents generally want to take over the world using globalism and (2) oppose it. He reviews many of the New Right's ideas (often with agreement) and members (with some sympathy) as well as surrounding topics. These include Pat Buchanan, Murray Rothbard, Ayn Rand, 4chan, Gamergate, trolling, Ann Coulter, Jim Goad, Gavin McInnes, Jared Taylor, and Christopher Cantwell. He concludes by suggesting that trust in mainstream, progressive-leaning news reporting and university teaching is declining; division in political opinion is growing, along with harsh feelings about people on the other side of that division; technology and the market are making some political disagreements irrelevant; and the New Right has potential to become quite influential.

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