Teeth in the Mist

Teeth in the Mist

Before the birth of time, a monk uncovers the Devil's Tongue and dares to speak it. The repercussions will be felt for generations...Sixteen-year-old photography enthusiast Zoey has been fascinated by the haunted, burnt-out ruins of Medwyn Mill House for as long as she can remember--so she and her best friend, Poulton, run away from home to explore them. But are they reall...

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Title:Teeth in the Mist
Author:Dawn Kurtagich
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Teeth in the Mist Reviews

  • Dawn Kurtagich

    September 2019: for those lovely readers asking, yes I do want to give you the sequel to TEETH! Stay tuned!

    (09/11) The cover went live today! So much love--thank you bookish fiends so much! <3

    (09/17) ARCs are in!

    (03/26) There is currently a Goodreads Giveaway running!

  • Laurie

    All hail the new queen of goth romance and YA horror! This book is that rarest of things - something truly unique (it harkens back to goth classics of literature like Jane Eyre and Rebecca but is infused with a witchy, feminist sensibility that completely reconfigures the genre). READ THIS BOOK IN PHYSICAL FORM or you'll miss the GENIUS use of font/page color/graphics to build atmosphere and tension (one of my favorite things about this author's writing). And the romance - sweet lord, Dawn Kurta

    All hail the new queen of goth romance and YA horror! This book is that rarest of things - something truly unique (it harkens back to goth classics of literature like Jane Eyre and Rebecca but is infused with a witchy, feminist sensibility that completely reconfigures the genre). READ THIS BOOK IN PHYSICAL FORM or you'll miss the GENIUS use of font/page color/graphics to build atmosphere and tension (one of my favorite things about this author's writing). And the romance - sweet lord, Dawn Kurtagich - you certainly know how to pull off crackling, supernatural, goth chemistry. Very highly recommended - and try to read it on a rainy weekend, preferably seated in an isolated Scottish castle set beside a dark, storming sea, with a single candle burning. Surrounded by walls decorated with horned skulls. #TeamRapley (and that red-eyed ram thing is one of the scariest visuals I've yet to encounter - so now I'm scared of goats)

  • Cass

    a little boring in the middle but it really picked up at the end

    v v good

  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    Buddy Read With Ladies Of Horror Fiction Group.

    I have the hardback and love the pics and writing style per usual but they got me to listen to the Audible and OMG! This book is creepy good on Audio!!! The sound effects, the creepy demon voices, the whispers!! Perfect for getting your creep on!! 🎃🧟♀

    Happy Reading!

    Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

    Buddy Read With Ladies Of Horror Fiction Group.

    I have the hardback and love the pics and writing style per usual but they got me to listen to the Audible and OMG! This book is creepy good on Audio!!! The sound effects, the creepy demon voices, the whispers!! Perfect for getting your creep on!! 🎃🧟‍♀️

    Happy Reading!

    Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  • Bark

    “You wield power no woman aught. You should be burned ALIVE!”

    I listened to Teeth in the Mist on audio and the production is truly fantastic and creepy but I have also heard the paper version includes lots of little extras and artwork that you miss out on if listening only to the audio. As I’m a wee bit confused and feeling a little dazed after my listening, as if I just awoke from a fuzzy nightmare, I may go ahead and splurge for the hardcover and give it a reread and see if I can clarify some t

    “You wield power no woman aught. You should be burned ALIVE!”

    I listened to Teeth in the Mist on audio and the production is truly fantastic and creepy but I have also heard the paper version includes lots of little extras and artwork that you miss out on if listening only to the audio. As I’m a wee bit confused and feeling a little dazed after my listening, as if I just awoke from a fuzzy nightmare, I may go ahead and splurge for the hardcover and give it a reread and see if I can clarify some things or if I were meant to feel this way. Either way I don’t regret listening to this disturbing tale!

    I don’t even know where to begin with this book. There’s a lot to it and words are failing me. There are three timelines but the book mainly focuses on two of them but know that the third is very, very important. Listening to the audio, I found myself getting tripped up in the timelines. There are two girls who make a treacherous trip up a mountain to a sinister looking and for sure haunted house and I kept mixing up who was who and who was with who and their backstories but that may just be me and my faulty brain or because it was on audio. Honestly, I don’t think this a book you can listen to while doing much else. It needs your 100% focus.

    There are some great characters here, strong-willed girls with tempers and creative curses and painful backstories. I don’t want to go into the plot too much but when mentions of Faustus, spells, witches, ghosts, curses and the glowing red eyes of a black ram (who may or not be related to Black Phillip!) kept appearing I had no idea where this book was leading me but I sure as hell wanted to follow it anywhere. If you’re a person who sometimes judges a book by the title and cover and doesn’t read the blurb, like myself, you may think this is a monster-fest sort of book. It is not that at all. It is an atmospheric creepfest of the creepiest order. The audio production only enhances that and I LOVED the experience. It takes some extremely surprising turns into the darkest of corners and I refuse to spoil any of them and likely couldn’t explain any of them if I tried.

    I’m going with a four for this first reading and may change my rating on a reread. Or not.

  • Ellen Gail

    Both haunting and baffling,

    falls somewhere between two and three stars. And I have simultaneously zero thoughts and every thought possible about it.

    Let's start with the positives: a BIG one is originality. Yes, it's a loose interpretation of

    , but it's an elaborate and ambitious tale of it's own.

    is fucking fearless, unafraid of mixing three timelines, letters,

    Both haunting and baffling,

    falls somewhere between two and three stars. And I have simultaneously zero thoughts and every thought possible about it.

    Let's start with the positives: a BIG one is originality. Yes, it's a loose interpretation of

    , but it's an elaborate and ambitious tale of it's own.

    is fucking fearless, unafraid of mixing three timelines, letters, journal entries, social media, and cam footage into a mind-meddling mixture.

    I'll admit, the similar tactic used in

    really worked for me. Brave though it may be, this story lost me in the convoluted mess of the narrative. For example, you have our mid 19th century character, Roan, who writes backwards letters to her deceased father.

    And this is one of the short ones. Is it really super cool? Absolutely. But with the longer letters, it's a roadblock. It yanked me straight out of any immersion that was happening, negating most of the cool factor with frustration.

    So, we have the 1851 timeline, where newly orphaned Roan Eddington is moving into a creepy ass house in some creepy ass mountains. Mill House has all kinds of bad history around it, as well as just being weird in general. Color coordinated rooms, secret doorways, suspiciously terrible weather, countless reports of ghosts, and all kinds of sinister things. There Roan meets, among others, Irish siblings Seamus and Emma, a wheelchair bound boy who can talk to snakes and a hot tempered lass with a colorful vocabulary (I especially love "pigeon-livered, gibfaced fool")

    Then there's modern day Zoey, a teenage girl who is eager to go a ghost hunting in the decrepit Mill House, both to gain insight into her family and their creepy magical roots. Also interspersed throughout the story are the journals of Hermine Smith, the wife of original Mill House architect, who history remembers as a witch burned at the stake.

    Conjurings and hauntings, devils and witches - spooky stuff abounds.

    My chief problem with this story is it's so damn confusing. It's atmospheric, but disjointed. To quote myself (when I was texting a friend about this batshit bonkers book as a I read it):

    There is just SO MUCH going on all the time. Conjuring, weird bloodlines, drawing symbols and what they mean, a creepy goat that might be the devil, hidden passages, exorcisms, a LOT of disappearances. And the ending! It's basically a non ending. There's such an insane reveal on the last page that makes negative sense, then bam, end of book.

    I got no sense of resolution or connection by the end, which I really felt was needed! How do you have that many cool things going on and not try to solidify a few of them by the end?

    I didn't hate

    . I liked a lot of the individual elements and characters. But the character and plot threads get so constantly tangled, without ever coming together into something completely satisfying. I know I'll come back to

    , cause she knows how to creep a girl out. But darn if I don't want more!["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>

  • Mogsy (MMOGC)

    3 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    I’ve read all of Dawn Kurtagich’s YA horror novels so far and Teeth in the Mist is probably the most elaborate but also the toughest to get into. A loose retelling of the legend of Faust who sells his soul to the devil for knowledge and power, the novel weaves together past and present to tell the stories of sixteen-year-old Zoey Root, a modern-day high school student, as well as Roan Eddington, a young woman who lived nea

    3 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    I’ve read all of Dawn Kurtagich’s YA horror novels so far and Teeth in the Mist is probably the most elaborate but also the toughest to get into. A loose retelling of the legend of Faust who sells his soul to the devil for knowledge and power, the novel weaves together past and present to tell the stories of sixteen-year-old Zoey Root, a modern-day high school student, as well as Roan Eddington, a young woman who lived nearly 170 years before.

    In 1851, Roan finds herself moving into Mill House, a remote mansion in the Welsh mountains owned by her new guardian Dr. Maudley following the death of her father. It is said that the house is haunted by the ghost of its architect’s wife, who was burned at the stake as witch. When Roan arrives, she discovers others around her age at the mansion, including Rapley, Maudley’s adopted son, as well as Emma and Seamus, Irish siblings who are also wards of the doctor. Together they find that Mill House is also home to something more sinister with roots to an ancient secret.

    Shifting gears to the present day, Zoey has always held a fascination for the burned-out ruins of Medwyn Mill House, and not only because of its atmosphere and intriguing history. Years before, her father made a research trip there to learn more about the circumstances behind his birth, only to return a shadow of himself, having lost his mind and most of his memory. Like him, Zoey also possesses supernatural gifts—which come at a high cost. By retracing the steps her father took, she is determined to find out what happened in the hopes of getting some answers for them both.

    Spread out in between Zoey and Roan’s perspectives is also a third point-of-view, presented to us in the form of diary entries written by a sixteenth century woman named Hermione. Newly married to a man with plans to construct the largest water mill in the area, her writings reveal clues from the past about the unsettling provenance of Mill House.

    All these disparate and complicated threads are pulled together in an organized enough manner, though I won’t lie, it made for a rather dull, sluggish beginning. The first half of the novel sought to establish the three characters, separated by the centuries. It’s difficult to tell at first how their storylines are related, but in time their connections are revealed, and mainly, they have to do with Mill House and the man who built it. Then, of course, there are the allusions to Faust and his infamous deal with the devil. In addition to exploring this theme, the early plot also attempts to expand upon the classic story by moving beyond the basics.

    Still, despite the lackadaisical pacing of the first half, Teeth in the Mist intrigued me with the interplay between its three timelines. Dawn Kurtagich is fast becoming a well-known name in YA horror, not only establishing herself as an authority when it comes to creating atmospheric settings but also a creative genius when it comes to presentation—as in how to play with the structure and format of a story to make it compelling and fun for the reader. For example, these methods were used in her last novel And the Trees Crept In to a great extent, where coming across disjointed prose and different font sizes and styles on the same page in order to portray the unraveling sanity of the main character was fairly common. It’s meant to pull you in and make you feel more immersed, and it’s very effective.

    I also think the story picks up in the second half, as the links between the three women became more apparent and dynamic. Because of the constant shifts, however, I didn’t feel that Teeth in the Mist was quite as creepy or moody, possibly because keeping up with all the moving parts was also a lot more demanding on my attention and drained my mental energy.

    Still, overall I enjoyed the book. I’ve had several busts this year already when it comes to horror YA, and at the very least I wasn’t disappointed in Teeth in the Mist even though it is probably not Kurtagich’s best. That honor still belongs to The Dead House, but I will still rabidly look forward the author’s books and I’m eager to see what she’ll write next.

  • Shaina

    Well, like her previous book, though intriguing and appealing to the eye; this was also hard to follow and disjointed. There are big ideas and concepts that don’t seem to lead much of anywhere. Something will seem to happen only to be easily fixed or ignored. The timelines didn’t bother me but the writing just kept throwing me off to where I had to go back and see where I had left off with that character. It was the same for me in the other book.

    I did really find it interesting and I wonder if

    Well, like her previous book, though intriguing and appealing to the eye; this was also hard to follow and disjointed. There are big ideas and concepts that don’t seem to lead much of anywhere. Something will seem to happen only to be easily fixed or ignored. The timelines didn’t bother me but the writing just kept throwing me off to where I had to go back and see where I had left off with that character. It was the same for me in the other book.

    I did really find it interesting and I wonder if there is another to come ie; series.

    It was hard to keep up with who really died and who didn’t. And who ended up in one place or the other.

    The Roan/Rapley & Adam/Eve thing was not really explained all that well. We were just supposed to intuitively get it somehow.

    Characters’ feelings seem to change very quickly. It is almost as if they are not aware of it themselves.

    The backwards letters were neat but the long ones were annoying to try to read.

    What happened to Jenny ?

    Fostos did succeed in killing some of the Unclosed, so he was undefeated even with the wheel broken right? Or is it wrong; with the wheel broken in the metaphysical world even the souls that died under the mountain did not extend his life?

    They were all half-siblings but Roan ends up with (maybe) Rapley’s child it hints of at the end. Does that fulfill something hinted at?

    If this book was more of a cohesive and whole project that flowed easily from one chapter to the next it would be five stars. For now just 3 to 3.5. The creativity is good but I think it takes a bit away from the writing and character development.

  • Ellie (faerieontheshelf)

    BASED ON FAUSTUS AIIIYEEE

    “epic horror-fantasy” okay this is my favourite genre crossed with my least favourite genre because I’m an actual pansy? And this actually sounds terrifying?

    also I’m not fond of the cover - the publisher could’ve done so much better and we all know this, there was floods of potential

  • megs_bookrack

    My copy just arrived!!

    She thick and she gorgeous! There are some really cool pages in here too. Some black pages with white text as well as pictures. This just jumped WAYYYYY up the TBR list!

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