Other Words for Home

Other Words for Home

I am learning how to besadand happyat the same time.Jude never thought she’d be leaving her beloved older brother and father behind, all the way across the ocean in Syria. But when things in her hometown start becoming volatile, Jude and her mother are sent to live in Cincinnati with relatives.At first, everything in America seems too fast and too loud. The American movies...

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Title:Other Words for Home
Author:Jasmine Warga
Rating:

Other Words for Home Reviews

  • Laura (bbliophile)

    I guess dinner tonight will be seasoned with my tears

  • Lala BooksandLala

    Perfection

  • Sarah Ressler Wright

    Sooo good. Although labeled MG, it reads for YA as well and especially as it’s written in verse, students will love it. The descriptions of food-fabulous! The metaphors and turns of phrase are fantastic and the themes of resilience and surviving to thriving so well done.

    Phenomenal a must read for everyone!

  • Casey Lyall

    So beautiful. This novel is an immersive, emotional experience. One of my favourite passages:

    "There is an Arabic proverb that says:

    It is said about

    the nicest

    kindest

    people.

    The type of people

    who help you

    rise."

    100% recommend it for any collection.

    Thank you to the publisher for sending a copy for review.

  • Kate ☀️ Olson

    Stellar, breathtaking middle grade novel in verse. Adding to my 6th and 7th grade lit circle lists for next year!

  • Clemlucian (🏳️‍🌈the villain's quest)

    |

    As someone who doesn't read a lot of middle-grade, I was surprised to read a book so vulnerable, raw and realistic about Islamophobia. I think it's incredible that children, these days, get to read more diverse books like this when they're growing up.

    |

    As someone who doesn't read a lot of middle-grade, I was surprised to read a book so vulnerable, raw and realistic about Islamophobia. I think it's incredible that children, these days, get to read more diverse books like this when they're growing up.

    Other Words From Home follows the story of Jude, a little girl from Syria who moves away from Home with her pregnant mother, leaving her father and revolutionary older brother behind. It follows Jude as she tries to keep her Muslim values under the racist pressure of an America post-terrorism.

    As I said before, I completely adored this book. I thought the point of view of Jude was matured and contrasted; it showed that not all Muslims have the same experience, that all white people don't share the same views, and that mixed people are in trapped in between. The take was refreshingly unique and necessary. I can not stress that enough.

    My only criticism with Other Words For Home was the format as it did nothing for me. The book is written in verses (sort off) but they don't rhyme, nor do they have an interesting rhythm. It felt more like an easy way to write short sentences than an artistic, necessary way to tell the story. It didn't feel any different from ordinary prose, only shorter.

  • Daniel

    Other Words for Home

    Balzer + Bray

    352 pages

    8.6 (Best New Book)

    Other Words for Home

    It is not far-fetched to compare Jasmine Warga's latest effort,

    , to the oeuvres of Jason Reynolds in

    or even Ellen Hopkins in

    . They are writt

    Other Words for Home

    Balzer + Bray

    352 pages

    8.6 (Best New Book)

    Other Words for Home

    It is not far-fetched to compare Jasmine Warga's latest effort,

    , to the oeuvres of Jason Reynolds in

    or even Ellen Hopkins in

    . They are written in the form of short verses, an unconventional method to serve the heavy themes and describe the social phenomena that become the base of these three excellent books. If in

    , Reynolds aims to highlight the danger of gun and endless cycle of violence using concise and brief words so that young boys can easily understand, in

    Warga tries to portray a life of a young Syrian refugee who has to navigate her new life in the land of hope of America. As the book is addressed to middle-grade readers, frankly I cannot see more effective method to convey Warga's message than this.

    Just like in

    ,

    is full of innocence and naivety. Jude, which means generosity in Arabic, our main character, was a seventh grader from a small bucolic town in coastal plain of Syria. Her hometown was initially idyllic, unaware of all the tempest of Syrian civil war. But the peace came at a price as her older brother, who joined a subversive organization, trying to reform the government. Long gone are the peaceful days. But before the situation worsened, Jude was lucky enough to escape to America with her pregnant mother, leaving her father and brother and friend on an uncertainty. From the eyes of hers, we can see the abrupt change of her life: from tumultuous Syria to more modern, open-minded, and peaceful America. Or that's what she thought.

    Because in America, everything was foreign for her. People spoke English, even her mother's brother spoke English more. Everything was shiny and everyone was fashionable. Everything was completely different. But, Jude did not only need to adjust her new life in America, but she also needed to face her new identity as a teenage girl and a refugee. She faced contempt from her chic cousin, she had her first period, she had her first crush, and she learnt how to be a woman. Moreover, as a refugee who wore her hijab, Jude also received some disdain and rejection from Islamophobes. Her fear and confusion are perfectly captured by her words. My only complaint is sometimes they are too sophisticated for a young girl whose first language is not English, but once you're able to disregard that,

    is really enjoyable.

    Using this book, I believe that Warga tries to convince the readers that during at times like war, women are actually stronger than we think. Jude's perseverance and strength reminds me of that of Parvana from a beautiful Oscar-nominated animated film,

    . But even if she's so strong, Jude also realized that she's lucky. In one part of the book, she didn't like the word "lucky", but she knew that there are millions of people in Syria who didn't have her "luck", who didn't have a chance to escape from their war-torn country, who didn't have an opportunity to find a new home. In

    , though, Warga teaches us that the least thing that we can do is actually to accept the refugees and make them feel like home. The book is addressed to middle-grade readers, the future of our generation, and that's what makes this book an important read.

  • Shehzeen Muzaffar

    More hijabi girls on the cover? Hell yeah

  • Tucker

    Other words for home:

    domestic

    central

    familiar

    family

    household

    local

    national

    native

    at ease

    at rest

    down home

    homely

    homey

    in one's element

    in the bosom

    inland

    internal

  • megs_bookrack

    I was just commenting on this the other day. There are so many characters lately with the name Jude. I have never, ever in my life, met someone with that name!

    What gives?!

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