Let Your Mind Run: A Memoir of Thinking My Way to Victory

Let Your Mind Run: A Memoir of Thinking My Way to Victory

From an Olympic medalist runner and the record-holder in the women's marathon and half-marathon, a vividly inspirational memoir on using positive psychology and brain science to achieve unparalleled athletic success The day Deena Kastor became a truly elite runner was the day she realized that she had to ignore her talent--it had taken her so far, but only conquering the mental...

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Title:Let Your Mind Run: A Memoir of Thinking My Way to Victory
Author:Deena Kastor
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Let Your Mind Run: A Memoir of Thinking My Way to Victory Reviews

  • Ron S

    Rhonda Byrne in running shoes. Self-help in sneakers. Deena Kastor began her career running with genetic talent but didn't begin to truly make progress until she committed to a coach who challenged her to work on her mental approach and her philosophy. A book about discovery and making choices.

  • Wendy S.

    This book shows the powerful mind of an Olympic medalist who has managed to remain an artist at heart by controlling her thoughts at a level I don’t know that most can do. I am absolutely in awe of Deena Kastor!

  • Tricia Donley

    “I had learned disappointment was rooted in the desire to improve & that under the grief there was deep love.” This book reminded me why I love running and why I love pushing myself to new limits. Deena’s writing style was engaging and empowering.

  • Emily

    I loved this book! I was always interested in checking it out, but after a terrible final long run before starting to taper for my first marathon, I started listening to it on Audible for an emergency pep talk! Her stories of perseverance over many obstacles (injury, mental limitations she set for herself, loneliness, those assholes she ran with in Alamosa) and tips on channeling positivity and gratitude in the face of adversity really helped me when facing my own challenges. I also loved storie

    I loved this book! I was always interested in checking it out, but after a terrible final long run before starting to taper for my first marathon, I started listening to it on Audible for an emergency pep talk! Her stories of perseverance over many obstacles (injury, mental limitations she set for herself, loneliness, those assholes she ran with in Alamosa) and tips on channeling positivity and gratitude in the face of adversity really helped me when facing my own challenges. I also loved stories of her early track days (made me nostalgic for my own!) and the quotes at the start of every chapter. This is a book I'd reread/listen to again - great for runners but also great for anyone looking to become mentally tougher.

  • Gina

    I loved this book! Very inspirational. It's not just about Deena's impressive running career, but also about her journey on how to think positively and improve her running performances by changing her mental game. I got it from the library, but I'm going to have to buy a copy so I can mark my favourite parts and refer back to it when I need some inspiration.

  • Jen

    Outstanding! Loved it! So many nuggets of wisdom that I will need to use in my training. Highly recommend!

  • Debbie Boucher

    I belong to two book clubs. One read Deena's memoir when it first came out this spring. The other is reading it this month. I'm glad I finally got to it as I loved the book, not only because everyone here in Mammoth is proud of Deena and her accomplishments, but also because this memoir demonstrates the power of positive thinking. Running a marathon is a huge accomplishment, even for a talented runner like Deena. But it takes more than careful training, good nutrition, and support. What this boo

    I belong to two book clubs. One read Deena's memoir when it first came out this spring. The other is reading it this month. I'm glad I finally got to it as I loved the book, not only because everyone here in Mammoth is proud of Deena and her accomplishments, but also because this memoir demonstrates the power of positive thinking. Running a marathon is a huge accomplishment, even for a talented runner like Deena. But it takes more than careful training, good nutrition, and support. What this book discusses is the mental aspect of achieving difficult goals. It has helped me, even if my goals have nothing to do with running. I recommend it to anyone interested in someone who has persevered and reaped the rewards, both publicly and personally.

  • Jenny Bunting

    I first became interested in Kastor's story after watching "The Spirit of the Marathon," which in my opinion is the best sports documentary of all time. While I did find her narration stilted and the story dry at time, I enjoyed the running theme of positivity (pun intended) throughout the memoir. I really also connected to the idea of living an athlete's lifestyle, which I do want to implement into my life in some small way. I flew through this and overall, really enjoyed it and got something o

    I first became interested in Kastor's story after watching "The Spirit of the Marathon," which in my opinion is the best sports documentary of all time. While I did find her narration stilted and the story dry at time, I enjoyed the running theme of positivity (pun intended) throughout the memoir. I really also connected to the idea of living an athlete's lifestyle, which I do want to implement into my life in some small way. I flew through this and overall, really enjoyed it and got something out of it too.

  • Allison

    I enjoyed this book in the sense that I'm reading it at the "right" time: I'm looking for ways to "up my running game" that are within my control, and mentality is super-high on the list. I like the fact that Deena stuck to the memoir format--rather than sliding down the slippery self-help slope--and that she really took care to show the origins of her various mindset shifts, whether they came from a person, a book, or her own mind.

    However, I found her hard to relate to in a number o

    I enjoyed this book in the sense that I'm reading it at the "right" time: I'm looking for ways to "up my running game" that are within my control, and mentality is super-high on the list. I like the fact that Deena stuck to the memoir format--rather than sliding down the slippery self-help slope--and that she really took care to show the origins of her various mindset shifts, whether they came from a person, a book, or her own mind.

    However, I found her hard to relate to in a number of circumstances, particularly when she gave us a small taste of a particular struggle she was having during a race (bathroom urges and a blister come to mind) but then never gave us the upshot. (Did she poop her pants or luck out and have the urge pass? Was her foot a bloody mess after the race, or did she just imagine that blister?) In fact, the part of the book I most related to was when she recounted her first time training alone in Europe: loneliness and frustration are emotions we can all relate to, and trying to reframe experiences to change our emotions is something I'm still attempting to figure out.

    Is this book worth reading? For a runner/reader nerd like me, I'd say yes, although temper your expectations (as I didn't find the writing itself particularly fantastic). For anyone outside the running world? While the idea of changing your mindset to achieve something is fairly universal, I don't think this book would be nearly as impactful for those who haven't personally experienced the agonizing monotony of logging miles and straining for a finish line. Of course, as I only have my own experience to go on, I would love to have someone tell me otherwise (or concur).

  • Monster

    Kastor is not someone I relate to well (and is perhaps the sort of person I avoid). Her focus on positive thinking and mindset is probably the element of this book that most repels me, not because those cognitive behaviors are not helpful or even transformative, but because I think there are specific positionalities predisposed to be transformed by positive thinking; And it has everything to do with privilege, which Kastor seems oblivious to. Her narrative reads like modern, agnostic allegory of

    Kastor is not someone I relate to well (and is perhaps the sort of person I avoid). Her focus on positive thinking and mindset is probably the element of this book that most repels me, not because those cognitive behaviors are not helpful or even transformative, but because I think there are specific positionalities predisposed to be transformed by positive thinking; And it has everything to do with privilege, which Kastor seems oblivious to. Her narrative reads like modern, agnostic allegory of the Protestant work ethic.

    However, if you're a running nerd and you enjoy listening to hours of training montages and split times, this is good casual reading.

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