Let Me Hear a Rhyme

Let Me Hear a Rhyme

In this standalone novel, Tiffany D. Jackson tells the story of three Brooklyn teens who plot to turn their murdered friend into a major rap star by pretending he is still alive.Biggie Smalls was right. Things done changed. But that doesn’t mean that Quadir and Jarrell are okay letting their best friend Steph’s tracks lie forgotten in his bedroom after he’s killed—not when...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Let Me Hear a Rhyme
Author:Tiffany D. Jackson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Let Me Hear a Rhyme Reviews

  • Celia McMahon

    HOW DARE THIS BOOK COME INTO MY HOME. How dare it put me through a torrent of feelings. In the place where I sleep. Where I watch Netflix and eat jalapeno Cheetos.

    Thank you Edelweiss and publisher for the honor of reviewing this title ahead of its release date.

    This is the first book I’ve read by the author, but believe me, I’m scooping up her other titles shortly. This book follows three friends who, after the murder of their friend, set out to 1.find out who killed him and 2. Show the world h

    HOW DARE THIS BOOK COME INTO MY HOME. How dare it put me through a torrent of feelings. In the place where I sleep. Where I watch Netflix and eat jalapeno Cheetos.

    Thank you Edelweiss and publisher for the honor of reviewing this title ahead of its release date.

    This is the first book I’ve read by the author, but believe me, I’m scooping up her other titles shortly. This book follows three friends who, after the murder of their friend, set out to 1.find out who killed him and 2. Show the world his music. Set in the late 90’s in Brooklyn, Jackson throws into a world of hip hop, the daily struggles of teens and that of black families and in the injustices they face. It hit me emotions like the ones I got reading THE HATE YOU GIVE and DEAR MARTIN.

    This story is told by three points of view as well some past third person throw backs. I’ll usually feel overwhelmed by so many alternating perspectives, but this one didn’t bug me much at all.

    Read this book if you love:

    Old school hip hop references to make you feel old (or discover new ones if you’re not as old as I am)

    Strong friendships

    Amazing writing

    Don’t read it if you’re heartless and prone to shedding your snake skin at night.

  • Sierra

    4 of those stars are definitely for the book, 5th is because I just didn't want to stop reading it. This is without a doubt my favorite of her books so far.

  • Jazmen

    Love! Love! Love!

    The young adult genre has not yet seen a novel the likes of Let Me Hear A Rhyme, and whoever signed on for this title knew what they’re doing.

    Let Me Hear A Rhyme brought forth memories long since buried. It felt like someone ripped these pages right out of my childhood. Jackson knows, and she gets it.

    If LMHAR, were out when I was a teenager, I would have devoured it, in the same manner, I devoured my fifty cent snack: a bag of chips and a quarter juice.

    LMHAR is what Urban Fictio

    Love! Love! Love!

    The young adult genre has not yet seen a novel the likes of Let Me Hear A Rhyme, and whoever signed on for this title knew what they’re doing.

    Let Me Hear A Rhyme brought forth memories long since buried. It felt like someone ripped these pages right out of my childhood. Jackson knows, and she gets it.

    If LMHAR, were out when I was a teenager, I would have devoured it, in the same manner, I devoured my fifty cent snack: a bag of chips and a quarter juice.

    LMHAR is what Urban Fiction wishes it could be. This book is not Urban Fiction—it lacks a certain “urban fiction” quality. (That’s not a bad thing.) But, it would have definitely been UF teen, if it were a genre. I would’ve snatched it off the bookseller's table on 125th (the only place to find books fully “black”, at least at one point) tightly gripping the plastic-covered novel—eager to read it.

    Instead of sneaking my mother’s copy of True To The Game, well before I knew the “game” I would have eagerly grabbed this book. LMHAR fills in the gap; the void between: “Too old for Harry Potter, and too young for Urban Fiction.” It does for young black teens what books like The Hate U Give and its comparable titles have yet to accomplish. It took the streets it was unaware of, or afraid to portray and told the stories I would have easily related to. The black experience is all-encompassing, but neglecting the “streets,” and hip-hop neglects the stories that need telling.

    Quadir, Jarrell, and Jasmine could have easily been my friends.

    Steph would have hit it big one day. He could rap better than the best of them. But, his life was tragically cut short—leaving behind two grieving best friends, and a grieving sister.

    One day it hits them. Steph story is not over, and together they hatch a plan to make Steph the star he deserved to be; post-mortem. It’s genius, but how long can you pull off pretending someone’s alive that’s now dead?

    This book is absolute literary goodness. Stunningly written, unwittingly relatable, and outright good literature.

    Jackson told a story that wasn’t necessarily new but has never been told in the capacity with which she told it. She not only did Brooklyn justice, but she also did justice for boys like, Steph who lose their lives too soon, for little to no reason. And for the black girls who don’t fit in. The ones who were a little “weird,” the ones who felt just a little outside of “blackness.” The expectation being you had to be a certain way, to be considered fully black.

    I loved that Jasmine was pro-black and very in tune with her roots. I loved that Jackson let her wear her natural hair with pride. Edges and afro-puffs on fleek!

    It’s stories like these that allow us to see the unseen. Jackson is a master at that. My heart and black body are full. I’m filled to the brim with black pride and joy. This novel did what needed to be done.

    The characters practically leaped off the page. Jackson used these characters to take internalized black issues and struggles and put a bright light on them; staying true to the message without being preachy or holier than thou in the delivery.

    Kids from this generation will get to know what the 90s to the tip of the 2000s was like from an authentic place/voice. I have a serious case of nostalgia and will need to refer to my 90s playlist to satiate my current need to revisit this time period.

    Let Me Hear A Rhyme is a stunning, gritty and pulsating novel that does exactly what it sets out to do and it does it one hundred percent right. Buy this book. It will not disappoint you.

    If you need me, I’ll be looking for my Sergio Valente’s.

  • Laurie Anderson

    I loved this book - a great story, very well-told. Great tensions, relationships and so much Brooklyn!!!

    Teens will love this book... and so will a whole lot of adults!

    The only hard part for me was acknowledging that books set in 1998 now classify as historical fiction.

  • Sarah {Literary Meanderings}

    - - -

    In 2017, I read Tiffany's book

    , and I LOVED it. So,

    is my second read by this author. I enjoyed it, but not

    as much as I'd hoped. I was very close to giving this 5 stars, but the plot did drag a little and the ending wasn't what I'd hoped for.

    LMHAR is about three teens living in NY—Jasmine, Quadir, and Jarrell. It is also about Steph—who was recently murdered—best friend of Quadir and Jarrell, brother of Jasmi

    - - -

    In 2017, I read Tiffany's book

    , and I LOVED it. So,

    is my second read by this author. I enjoyed it, but not

    as much as I'd hoped. I was very close to giving this 5 stars, but the plot did drag a little and the ending wasn't what I'd hoped for.

    LMHAR is about three teens living in NY—Jasmine, Quadir, and Jarrell. It is also about Steph—who was recently murdered—best friend of Quadir and Jarrell, brother of Jasmine. The story is primarily centered around these three teens trying to gain fame for their dead friend/brother. More important than fame, though, is that they find Steph's lyrics so important that they really want to get them out there and make sure people

    Steph. They want to sell his music (pre-recorded, of course) to a record label and use the money to hire a private investigator to look into Steph's death. The problem? Convincing people to sign someone to a label when that person is deceased. So, they hide it and work around it. At first it works out great, but eventually things begin to get tangled and go south.

    Jarrell was definitely my favorite character. I appreciated a main character that didn't fit into a mold, so to speak. He was interesting and unique. An overweight guy with multitudes of confidence; comfortable in his own skin and witty to boot. Jarrell had endless love for the ladies and wasn't afraid to say so. Brains, talent, and more. He was a mood lightener with all of the serious topics going on in this book.

    Quadir lacked a little bit of substance, in my opinion, but I still think his POV was needed as it gave the story a different take on the situations going on within the book. Each of the three MC's had a little secret to share and it wouldn't have all fit together without Quadir.

    Jasmine was tougher for me to like

    , and I can recognize and admit this is due to me being a white girl. Jasmine has some anti-white tendencies (which is understandable, of course) and she gets caught up with a Malcolm-X-ideals type of group that doesn't really express themselves in a

    or

    way. They choose to be violent and that just adds to the problem. You don't put out a fire by throwing gasoline on it, yeah? Side note: Jasmine sort of reminded me of the dad from

    by Angie Thomas. BUT, Jasmine does have a sort of come-to-Jesus moment in the story where she realizes she is turning into exactly what she dislikes in others and makes a decision to be a better person. So, overall, her character was great as well. My hang ups with her come from me just not being able to connect with that specific part of her character as I can never understand what it is like to be a person of color in America.

    While I am in this vein, I will say that this book does highlight many social issues that have relevance. Police brutality (against POC specifically) is touched upon, which is such a major problem right now. The book also highlights how and why some people may get caught up in selling drugs (it may be the only way they see to help their family financially). It also makes you realize how important it is to choose who you trust carefully.

    Before I wrap up, I just want to say how

    it was to read a book set in the 90's. I am a true 90's kid/teen and I remember when Biggie was killed (they reference it a lot in this book) and I remember the music from back then and how huge it all was. It was a very nostalgic read for me!

    My only real negative thing to say is that the ending was a little unfathomable for me. It wasn't good or bad, it was just TOO PERFECT. I can't really describe it without spoiling the ending. It was just too unbelievable, honestly. But, I can definitely overlook it with the rest of the book being so enjoyable and special.

    Overall, I definitely found this book very hard to put down! It touches on very important and relevant issues regardless of the fact that this takes place in the 90's; it honestly just goes to show that things haven't change enough. This is a story of friendship and hardship, honestly and love. It is very special and I loved it. The characters are well built up and each one has a unique voice and story to tell, yet they all culminate into a very important thread in Steph. I recommend this one for sure!

    - - -

    From the publisher for review

    Katherine Tegen Books

    For more of my reviews, check out my blog!

  • Emma Giordano

    4.5 Stars! Review to come.

  • Jennifer

    This author is known for writing important and meaningful YA books. This book is no exception.

    This is the third book that I have read by this author. I have previously read: Allegedly and Monday's Not Coming.

    Let Me Hear A Rhyme is told from the POVs of three black teens from Brooklyn and is set in the late 90s. The POVs: Jasmine, Quadir, and Jarrell (all 1st person POVs).

    The basic premise of the book is that one of their friends is murdered. And he was a really good rapper. They want to posthumo

    This author is known for writing important and meaningful YA books. This book is no exception.

    This is the third book that I have read by this author. I have previously read: Allegedly and Monday's Not Coming.

    Let Me Hear A Rhyme is told from the POVs of three black teens from Brooklyn and is set in the late 90s. The POVs: Jasmine, Quadir, and Jarrell (all 1st person POVs).

    The basic premise of the book is that one of their friends is murdered. And he was a really good rapper. They want to posthumously make him a success.

    These kids are 15 and 16 and are in high school. The book features a lot of slang, which I found to be a bit too much.

    There is a bit of romance, but not a ton.

    There are also a few chapters that include the murdered friend (3rd person POV). These chapters show the dates (1997 and 1998). It was obvious that these took place before the friend died. But I found it a little bit confusing and wish that it had just been explained at the beginning that the rest of the story was moving forward from August 1998. Also, why is the story set in the late 90s at all?

    There is a bit of a mystery as the teens want to find out how their friend died.

    I did like the premise of the story. It was an interesting idea. The author tells a powerful story. But overall I just didn't find myself overly invested in the story. There was so much slang and maybe some people love reading when teens talk like that. But for me it made it harder to understand.

    Thanks to edelweiss and Katherine Tegen Books for allowing me to read this book.

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)

    a deceptive suspense story // thanks for my life Tiffany D. Jackson

  • Ellen Gail

    Okay I know

    has just barely hit the shelves. But I'm already ready for this one anyway. More

    !

    GIMME!

  • شيماء ✨

    me, vibrating so hard I begin to clip through the floors: I am...moderately excited

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.