Diana

Diana

Beautiful, resourceful, treacherous, vulnerable - she was a woman full of contradictions and he would never stop loving her. As a young girl Diana is irrepressible, untameable and, to the orphaned John, endlessly fascinating. Only daughter of a wealthy businessman, she is drawn both to a rigorous outdoor life in the west country with her horses and the glittering London...

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Title:Diana
Author:R.F. Delderfield
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Diana Reviews

  • Sandy

    This is another Delderfiled book about the uniqueness of Pre-WW I England.... this, the story of a young woman of privilege and her life..... Yes, full of things which today we would revile and castigate as classist, repressive and arrogant examples of the social inequalities of the time...... But all I saw -read, imagined, dreamt of - was the beautiful, bucolic English countryside and apparently genteel life of its people, both working poor and land owners alike.....

  • Sewwolf

    This was my first adult romance and I read it at 13. I loved this book and the second part The Unjust Skies. This is the only book to this day that has made me cry. It is a true love story from teen to adult. I can't believe no one ever made this movie as it would have been a classic one. This is one of my top 5's of all time and I've read a lot of book spanning 40 some years.

  • Duncan Leung

    I prefer this book over Romeo and Juliet any day. This is just how teen romance should be.

  • Peggy

    I first read Diana when I was 12. At that time I found the character of Diana to be very romantic. I have since re-read this book twice; once in my 20's and then last year when I turned 60. I have always loved this book, especially since it was probably the first "grownup" book I read as a pre-teen.

    But now that I'm older I feel very different about the characters. Diana is truly a very selfish person and there were times when I would get so exasperated with John for putting up with her. But John

    I first read Diana when I was 12. At that time I found the character of Diana to be very romantic. I have since re-read this book twice; once in my 20's and then last year when I turned 60. I have always loved this book, especially since it was probably the first "grownup" book I read as a pre-teen.

    But now that I'm older I feel very different about the characters. Diana is truly a very selfish person and there were times when I would get so exasperated with John for putting up with her. But John does truly love Diana and sometimes we just can't help who our heart connects with in life.

    I would definitely recommend this book as it is very well written and does explain the "class" structure in the United Kingdom in the pre war years.

  • Bettie

    This is the original BBC mini-series 'Diana' that aired in 1984.

    It is based on the R F Delderfield novel of the same name.

    Cast:

    Patsy Kensit - Young Diana

    Jenny Seagrove - Older Diana

    Kevin McNally - Jan

    Iain Anders - Reuben

    Yves Aubert - Yves de Royden

    Christina Barryk - Mary

    Yves Beneyton - Raoul de Royden

    Elizabeth Bennett - Mrs. Gayelord-Sutton

    Jean Boissery - Rance

    Fred Bryant - Luke

    Directors:

    Richard Stroud

    David Tucker

    Writers:

    R F Delderfield (novel)

    Andrew Davies (writer)

    Diana by Delderfield

    winter

    This is the original BBC mini-series 'Diana' that aired in 1984.

    It is based on the R F Delderfield novel of the same name.

    Cast:

    Patsy Kensit - Young Diana

    Jenny Seagrove - Older Diana

    Kevin McNally - Jan

    Iain Anders - Reuben

    Yves Aubert - Yves de Royden

    Christina Barryk - Mary

    Yves Beneyton - Raoul de Royden

    Elizabeth Bennett - Mrs. Gayelord-Sutton

    Jean Boissery - Rance

    Fred Bryant - Luke

    Directors:

    Richard Stroud

    David Tucker

    Writers:

    R F Delderfield (novel)

    Andrew Davies (writer)

    Diana by Delderfield

    winter 2013

    tbr busting

    film only

    under 500

    twixt the wars

    young romance

    br>eng>devon

    books about books and writing>journalism

    Remember where Patsy Kensit started?

    ...and where have you seen him before:

    What about

    10 x 1 hour episodes from the BBC

  • B.B. Shepherd

    It's so funny; I was talking to a friend about books just a couple of days ago and was trying to describe this book but couldn't remember the title or the author. Today I was browsing something else and a book by Delderfield was one of the recommendations. Yes! That's the author! Browsing through his books brought me to Diana, though the title still didn't mean anything to me, the description sounded about right. The only other thing I could remember about it was a quote at the beginning from a

    It's so funny; I was talking to a friend about books just a couple of days ago and was trying to describe this book but couldn't remember the title or the author. Today I was browsing something else and a book by Delderfield was one of the recommendations. Yes! That's the author! Browsing through his books brought me to Diana, though the title still didn't mean anything to me, the description sounded about right. The only other thing I could remember about it was a quote at the beginning from a poem: Sennacherib. After a little investigation (Amazon look-inside, LOL) I found that this was, indeed, the book.

    Why the long explanation? Well, I read this book in my early twenties (a very long time ago) and it has stuck with me. I think it was a book that I found at my husband's parents house. Anyway, it was one of those books that I didn't really like but I couldn't stop reading, and was just SO sure that it was going to have this great, culminating ending...and it didn't. Well-written? Absolutely. Interesting? I guess it must have been or I wouldn't have kept reading. But I found it ultimately depressing and anti-climactic. I have a lingering uneasiness about this book. I may have to read it again as a more mature woman and perhaps my rating will change.

  • Carolyn Agosta

    Not my favorite Delderfield novel. Having long been a fan of RF Delderfield (the Swann Trilogy, To Serve Them All My Days, The Avenue), I was excited to find a 'new' book by him, but this story just turned me off. Diana may have come across as a romantic figure early on, but I really got tired of her constant shifts, and stopped caring what happened to the two of them. The scene where Jan watches as she distracts Rance just sickened me, no matter why she was doing it.

    Delderfield has written

    Not my favorite Delderfield novel. Having long been a fan of RF Delderfield (the Swann Trilogy, To Serve Them All My Days, The Avenue), I was excited to find a 'new' book by him, but this story just turned me off. Diana may have come across as a romantic figure early on, but I really got tired of her constant shifts, and stopped caring what happened to the two of them. The scene where Jan watches as she distracts Rance just sickened me, no matter why she was doing it.

    Delderfield has written similar characters before, particularly in the Swann Trilogy, with one of the sons (whose name I can't remember) and his willfull, spoiled rich wife. I didn't care for that character and I don't care for Diana. When I saw the direction the ending was heading, I didn't even finish the book.

    One thing worth noting, Delderfield's novels always introduce some pretty interesting viewpoints on sexual relationships. Not that he spends a lot of time on describing sex scenes, not at all, but the psychology behind the sexual part of a couple's relationship. In this book, At one point, Jan seems to realize that he has a sexual reaction to Diana that he has romanticized, which is absolutely true, but it's not often that I've read a book where a man romanticizes a woman because he lusts for her. Usually it's the woman who has romanticized a man who physically turns her on, even though if she were to be honest about it, his personality is not truly loving.

  • Debbi

    Reading this book was like plowing a rocky field. It took forever! I still had to give it 3 stars as it was a good story and was well written. I just didn't enjoy reading it because I had to work at it.

  • Colleen

    I'm not sure I've ever read anything quite like this. There are two parts to Diana. In the first, a young man named John falls for a girl named Diana when she rescues him from an angry gamekeeper who works on her parents' estate. He is poor and works in his uncle's used furniture store and Diana is completely out of his league. Thus begins his love, and eventually unhealthy obsession, with the spoiled only-daughter of the inhabitants of the Heronslea estate. It's clear that these two are

    I'm not sure I've ever read anything quite like this. There are two parts to Diana. In the first, a young man named John falls for a girl named Diana when she rescues him from an angry gamekeeper who works on her parents' estate. He is poor and works in his uncle's used furniture store and Diana is completely out of his league. Thus begins his love, and eventually unhealthy obsession, with the spoiled only-daughter of the inhabitants of the Heronslea estate. It's clear that these two are soulmates. But Diana also loves her money and is incredibly selfish, and the plot becomes "will she choose money over her "soulmate"? This first part was beautifully written and Delafield perfectly captured the spirit of these two. You felt the gamut of emotions that John felt as he pursued Diana--joy, jealousy, elation, confusion. Delafield's descriptions of the English countryside were lovely. But eventually all this got on my nerves. I became sick of Diana's cruel and manipulative treatment of John and really annoyed by John's inability to deny her anything. It was like watching a horror movie where you can see the protagonist (John) walking right into the trap (Diana). And all the while you're yelling, "No, don't do it!" Or "No, don't go there!" Nevertheless, that's the way life goes sometimes and I was prepared to rate Diana 4 stars. Then came Part Two... All of a sudden It skips ahead many years and WWII is going on and John is married to someone else and Diana has a child and she's working for the French Resistance and the two become British spies and they participate in these confusing whacky adventures and they go on a murderous killing spree and they get involved in these ridiculous gun and bomb-filled fights with the Nazis. I'm not joking! It's like Part One and Part Two are two COMPLETELY different books smushed together (later, while reading about the author on Wikipedia, I discovered that that's exactly what happened). Part Two was stupid and ludicrous and I hated it. My rating of Diana plummeted to one star. Ultimately, I raised it to two stars because the ending returned to the beautiful writing of Part One. Diana is a long, long slog at almost 700 pages and I couldn't wait for it to be over so I could move on to something else. If I'd known how bad Part Two was going to be, I'm not sure I would have bothered with this book at all

  • Misfit

    I'm giving this one up for now and perhaps try another day. Other books are calling and not much is happening here.

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