The Deathless

The Deathless

From one of fantasy’s biggest recent breakthrough authors comes an exciting, brand new series.The demons…In the endless forests of the Wild, humanity scratches a living by the side of the great Godroads, paths of crystal that provide safe passage and hold back the infernal tide. Creatures lurk within the trees, watching, and plucking those who stray too far from safety.The...

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Title:The Deathless
Author:Peter Newman
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Edition Language:English

The Deathless Reviews

  • Marielle

    I'm a big fan of The Vagrant trilogy and had high hopes for The Deathless, I wasn't dissapointed. Peter Newman is now officially one of my favorite authors!

    What can I say, floating castles, scary creatures and flying immortal men are the ingredients of this fantastic book!

    A whole new world, with new beings and new rules and yet the same original and refreshing feel as The Vagrant trilogy.

    My favorite character is Lady Pari, a strong inventive and intelligent woman.

    I'm very much looking forward

    I'm a big fan of The Vagrant trilogy and had high hopes for The Deathless, I wasn't dissapointed. Peter Newman is now officially one of my favorite authors!

    What can I say, floating castles, scary creatures and flying immortal men are the ingredients of this fantastic book!

    A whole new world, with new beings and new rules and yet the same original and refreshing feel as The Vagrant trilogy.

    My favorite character is Lady Pari, a strong inventive and intelligent woman.

    I'm very much looking forward to the next installment in this series!

  • Petros Triantafyllou

    Fantasy Fiction has an ever-evolving nature. Throughout the years there has been a number of prominent authors who had the ability to alter its natural course. Some of them heavily influenced the genre to the point that whole new sub-genres were created, and others nudged it to a new direction ever so slightly that was barely even noticeable, but helped modernize the genre all the same. Peter Newman is one of the latest.

    The only safe place left for humanity is the side of the Godroads. The Wild

    Fantasy Fiction has an ever-evolving nature. Throughout the years there has been a number of prominent authors who had the ability to alter its natural course. Some of them heavily influenced the genre to the point that whole new sub-genres were created, and others nudged it to a new direction ever so slightly that was barely even noticeable, but helped modernize the genre all the same. Peter Newman is one of the latest.

    The only safe place left for humanity is the side of the Godroads. The Wild is infected by Demons, and the only thing keeping them at bay are the Deathless. Immortals from seven royal families who have ruled for centuries, every time they die they get to be reborn in the bodies of their family. But when a scheme to murder a Deathless and all of his descendants is exposed, the fragile balance shatters, bringing all kinds of hell loose in the world.

    Peter Newman first got our attention with The Vagrant. A fresh and exciting debut told by a unique voice and with an unparalleled prose, it made a sensation in the fantasy community. The sequels were equally impressive, establishing Newman and bringing him one step closer to becoming a household name. But a lot of people, including me, held their breath, waiting to see what comes next. Was the success of the The Vagrant trilogy just a one time thing simply because Newman offered something different, or can he replicate his success with another series? After finishing The Deathless, I can assure you that, without a doubt, Peter Newman is here to stay.

    The Deathless takes place in a complete new setting and no previous knowledge is required, although people who have read Newman's other trilogy will see an easter egg or two, connecting the two worlds. The world in which The Deathless takes place, the whole setting even, is bizarre, but that is to be expected. Newman likes to build his own distinctive world that will be memorable enough to stand out among myriads of other fantasy settings. His characters are exceptionally well-fleshed-out, staying close and occasionally crossing the obscure, thin line, separating hero from villain. The story itself is intriguing and provocative, but it's the compelling prose and captivating imagery that tops it off.

    Finally, as is the case with The Vagrant, The Deathless works as a standalone. I'm confident that it will sell good enough to guarantee a sequel, and more accurately a complete trilogy, but as opposed to other entries in new fantasy series, you can read this one and get a satisfying ending.

  • Robin Hobb

    The usual caveat: I received a free advance reading copy of this work. I've met the author and found him to be a very pleasant person. Still, I don't think this affects my response to the work.

    I jumped into reading sf and fantasy at a very young age. One of the aspects of our genre that I noticed even then was the 'sink or swim' style that so many books share. The reader is plunged into a new world, and had best hit the ground running and keep a keen eye on the prose to pick up every cue and clu

    The usual caveat: I received a free advance reading copy of this work. I've met the author and found him to be a very pleasant person. Still, I don't think this affects my response to the work.

    I jumped into reading sf and fantasy at a very young age. One of the aspects of our genre that I noticed even then was the 'sink or swim' style that so many books share. The reader is plunged into a new world, and had best hit the ground running and keep a keen eye on the prose to pick up every cue and clue as to where one is and what is going on.

    I love that. I dread books that spend the first chapter summarizing the last 200 years of history, the genealogy of the heroine, and explaining the conflict and detailing the various geographies. Get to the story!

    And Peter Newman does just that. No droning history lessons!; instead it's like running to catch a train and being jerked on board, only to find oneself in the company of some extraordinary passengers, each with an agenda and an adventure.

    No spoilers, of course. But I promise you that this is a unique world, with a social structure you haven't encountered before, and with some truly nasty little creepers threatening that society.

    Clues are nicely placed, hidden in plain sight. Characters show unexpected but believable resilience. They can think. They can even change their minds about things! They come in lovely shades of gray, and none of them are perfect.

    This is an entry book to a new world. It does leave some threads hanging at the end, but it has enough of a resolution that I am happy to recommend this as a stand alone book, too.

    This isn't really a spoiler, as it won't make sense until after you've read the book. I found myself looking at my grandchildren and thinking, "If I were that detached from them, which one would I choose as a candidate . . . . "

  • James Tivendale

    I received an advanced reader copy of The Deathless in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank Peter Newman and Harper Voyager for the opportunity.

    Newman's first entry into a new fantasy series presents a world with floating castles which are connected by roads of crystal alongside which human settlements are erected. These Godsroads are safe passages between the floating fortresses of the great houses. Covering most of the created environment is The Wilds - a macabre and terrifyin

    I received an advanced reader copy of The Deathless in exchange for an honest review. I would like to thank Peter Newman and Harper Voyager for the opportunity.

    Newman's first entry into a new fantasy series presents a world with floating castles which are connected by roads of crystal alongside which human settlements are erected. These Godsroads are safe passages between the floating fortresses of the great houses. Covering most of the created environment is The Wilds - a macabre and terrifying forested area full of unspeakable horrors, extreme darkness, shifting trees, and creatures such as the infamous Scurrying Corpseman and Whispercages. Certain segments of the narrative that were set in The Wilds were truly intense and felt like a nightmare right out of a Brother's Grimm fairy tale.

    The elite of this world are known as The Deathless and upon dying they are reborn using a family member as a vessel, essentially being reborn in a younger body to rule again. The Deathless have access to crystal armour which incorporates wings and Paralympian runners-like leg blades which grants them the power of flight and presents extra strength, endurance, and stamina. These warriors frequently go on hunts into The Wilds to protect the settlements alongside the Godsroads from the grotesque horrors of the forests and they are the celebrities of this world. We join the action as a rebirthing ceremony is taking place. It turns out that all is not well in House Sapphire and perhaps certain people do not want noble Lord Rochant to be brought back into existence. The Deathless starts off in fantastic fashion featuring assassins, betrayals, complex characters, and a meticulously crafted plot.

    There are four point of view perspectives in The Deathless. Two characters are Deathless (Vasin and Pari) and the third is a highborn mother (Chandni) whose child could be used as a vessel for another lifecycle in the future so is extremely important and ultimately sacred. I will not mention the fourth point of view perspective as that could be approaching spoiler territory but it was probably my favourite, was featured much less than the others and was a really unique way of storytelling. The characters are outstanding in this novel. To begin with, I occasionally got Chandni and Pari's scenes confused but that's probably my incompetence and after a quarter of the book I had no such quarrels as there individual traits and personalities shone. The side cast are pretty brilliant too, one of my favourites being a loyal giant dog-like beast with five legs.

    This is my first time reading one of Newman's books but it definitely will not be the last. I will be following this series and reading each entry as soon as I possibly can. The Deathless is dark fantasy, adult in nature yet unlike a lot of recent books in this grimdark era, I found all the point of view characters likable and there is an underlining possibility of hope. It does feature moments of horror, terror, and unpredictability. I believe I am quite attuned to predicting the directions a narrative will take but I was unsuccessful with that venture here which makes the reading experience for me much fuller and more enjoyable. This story really pulled at my emotions and my heartstrings. Once I was a quarter of the way through and used to the writing style, which is excellent - Newman has a voice that is extremely addictive to read, I found this novel really difficult to put down. Newman has composed a stunning tale with The Deathless. Unpredictable drama tinged with horror and featuring the sort of horrid creatures you wouldn't want to meet late at night. Not forgetting The Deathless who are almost like superheroes with their armour, power, influence, and immortality. There was so much to enjoy here and it's a book I'll be thinking about for a long time. This is essentially a tale of two babies and I can't begin to predict what will happen next - but I can't wait.

  • Sean Barrs the Bookdragon

    In a world overgrown with dark forest, known ominously as the wilds, only the immortal Deathless can hold evil at bay and protect the innocent from the vile and ravenous daemons that stalk amongst the trees.

    The Deathless patrol their lands in floating crystal castles, propelled by the same nature defying magic that gives continued life to their souls. They transfer bodies when they age, making each dynasty everlasting. There are seven of them, each defined by a crystal which is the emblem of the

    In a world overgrown with dark forest, known ominously as the wilds, only the immortal Deathless can hold evil at bay and protect the innocent from the vile and ravenous daemons that stalk amongst the trees.

    The Deathless patrol their lands in floating crystal castles, propelled by the same nature defying magic that gives continued life to their souls. They transfer bodies when they age, making each dynasty everlasting. There are seven of them, each defined by a crystal which is the emblem of their house. They make their armour and weapons from it, shaping spears, plate and wings that allow them to fly over the wilds and hunt the creatures that dwell within. It is the only time they truly feel alive in an eternity of murderous house politics.

    Newman vividly creates a place of darkness, despair and absolute horror within the wilds. For those that are not immortal, it is a place of dread and the very essence of a nightmare. The sections of the plot that were set there evoked a distinctively eerie feeling overshadowed by the presence of something malignant and rotting. I loved it. It felt like something Lovecraft would have devised. There are, no doubt, more strange horrors lurking within just waiting for the right opportunity to strike down a Deathless immortal (if he can escape away from the life of plotting, scheming and politics.)

    There are three main point of view characters, each of which provides a distinct voice that helps to establish the working of this intricately crafted fantasy universe. And it is a fine one. It hasn’t given all the answers away, as some books do far too early, but instead throws you straight into the action. It begins with an assassination attempt, the aftermath of which pushes the plot forward for the rest of the book. Vasin, Pari and Chand (the POVs) all become preoccupied with surviving the ramifications of the blood bath, and, naively, begin to push the real threat to the back of their minds.

    However, the mysterious enemy appears to be far more complex than the characters suppose them to be. They see only evil in the wilds, though I think there is far more at play. Newman leaves just enough suggestions to hint at something different entirely. Where did they come from? Who are these creatures? These are questions I asked myself as I saw into the mind of the Deathless, immortals that appear noble and flawless, but are not as perfect as they pretend to be. I think the origins of the daemons are somehow interlinked with the magic of the immortals. Time will tell.

    is but a peak into the vastness of this new fantasy world. I feel like I’ve only seen a fraction of what is to come. There are more Deathless dynasties to introduce which will, no doubt, come with more in-fighting and political back-stabbing. Everybody seems to be making a bid for power. Roll on book two!

  • Bradley

    I've become a pretty big fan of Peter Newman since the Vagrant books. They were quirky, hardcore horror, fantasy, and even SF bundled as one huge treat.

    The Deathless breaks that mold by wrapping us deep inside a world of dark magical forest with strange creatures and castles rather than ravening armies.

    What makes this special? Immortality isn't that special, but these are lords and ladies of immortals breeding their line to take over their children's bodies by way of a special bloodletting cerem

    I've become a pretty big fan of Peter Newman since the Vagrant books. They were quirky, hardcore horror, fantasy, and even SF bundled as one huge treat.

    The Deathless breaks that mold by wrapping us deep inside a world of dark magical forest with strange creatures and castles rather than ravening armies.

    What makes this special? Immortality isn't that special, but these are lords and ladies of immortals breeding their line to take over their children's bodies by way of a special bloodletting ceremony... and the realm's leaders are... slipping. Going a little mad. Their one task is to protect the castle and the people from the monsters in the wild.

    But what is the real difference between the monsters in the wild and the immortal men and women? That's the big question I keep asking. In the meantime, we have an adventure with flying crystal plate armor, very interesting beasties that aren't behaving quite as monstrously as they ought, and a quirky, smart old woman getting herself involved in bigger events. A large part of the tale centers on a newborn on the run with his mother and faithful servant, protecting him as the literal vassal for an immortal.

    I think I had more fun with the big questions and the wild world than with any of the indoors bits with the immortals, but overall I had no complaints about this fantasy. It still has it's cool quirks like Newman's other writings, but it is also slightly more mainstream than them.

    Still enjoyable, even if I didn't squee this time. :)

  • Kaitlin

    Okay, this book is a firm new favourite for me, and I am jolly happy about that becuase I recently saw and met both Peter and Emma Newman at Super Relaxed Fantasy Club in London, and they are both delightful... Not only is Peter lovely in person, this book is definitely filled with an awful lot of drama, excitement, quality characters and unique ideas. I f

    Okay, this book is a firm new favourite for me, and I am jolly happy about that becuase I recently saw and met both Peter and Emma Newman at Super Relaxed Fantasy Club in London, and they are both delightful... Not only is Peter lovely in person, this book is definitely filled with an awful lot of drama, excitement, quality characters and unique ideas. I fully loved it, and I expect that this series will continue to grow and develop over the course of the series (which I am now eagerly anticipating and looking out for!)

    This is the story of the Deathless, a race of humans who are elevated above normal humanity and they are able to reincarnate into their descendants when they die (essentially making them immortal). The Deathless is made up of different Houses, each one named for a precious stone such as Tanzanite, Sapphire, Ruby etc. We're predominantly following the Sapphires and one Tanzanite in this book, because the Sapphires have recently suffered a slight dip in honour due to some failings within their House and trading with the Wild (a dark and untamed part of the world that kills almost everything on sight).

    Along with the ability to reincarnate and continue living far beyond the normal lifespan, provided new bodies (a.k.a Vessels) are available, the Deathless have special Crystal armour which they can wear to fly. They also live in grand castles in the sky so they can look down on their lands and help out the humans when the Wild comes for them.

    In this book we pick up the story just as one of the Sapphire Lords, Lord Rochant, is about to be reborn into a new vessel. However, the ceremony doesn't go as planned because assassins are inside the castle, and they are trying to kill off the surviving members of his line. We see through the eyes of multiple characters, one of whom is Lord Rochant's lover, Lady Perry of Tanzanite, and she's in the castle at the time of the attacks and becomes integral to the hunt and rescue of the vessel and Lord Rochant.

    We're also following a young mother named Chandri, and her baby Satiendra, who is the heir to Lord Rochant's line, and the last surviving vessel after the attacks. Chandri is forced to flee quickly in the book, and we follow her as she descends from the sky to The Wilds below and is forced to fend for herself with the help of just one lone guard, Varg.

    Another character we look through the eyes of is Lord Vassim of Sapphire. His mother was killed for her betrayal and he has spent the last few years wallowing and unhappy, but when he leads a hunt nto the Wilds he finds out the truth of his mother's fall and this leads him on a path he never could have anticipated.

    Of the three leading plot-lines and character, I found Lady perry to be the most enjoyable. She's elderly, but also completely full of life and vibrance still. She may have a frail body, but that is not going to stop her from seeking justice and she is witty too. I really enjoyed how she managed to manipulate different situations to her advantage, and I think she has a lot of exciting potential still to come.

    On the whole, the action for this was exactly what I enjoy, a mix of slower plot to get to know the characters, and faster fights and action which felt pace-y and exciting to read about. I definitely think the balance here was well done, and the story felt like it flew by at a good speed, without seeming overly long or too hurried.

    I have to say, the magic of this world lies largely with the world itself and the things that can be found there such as Dogkin (kind of like a 5-legged dog) and crystal armour. There are also a whole load of things that lie waiting in the Wilds and these creepy rituals and beats were definitely visceral and haunting to read about.

    In the end, I found myself completely absorbed in the writing and the characters. I cannot wait to find out where it will go next, because there's a lot of things which are revealed in the latter half, and which will no doubt have big consequences, and I will eagerly watch for the next one in the series. A strong 4.5*s from me and I would say well worth a read even if you weren't as much a fan of the Vagrant as the style here is very different and a lot easier to get into, I thoughts. :)

  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    That was a bit bizarre and cool! I need to backtrack and read his Vagrant trilogy!!

    Happy Reading!

    Mel 🖤🐺🐾

  • Claudia

    I am so disappointed that my first encounter with Peter Newman’s work was such a letdown. I wanted to abandon it several times, but I kept going telling myself that something will improve, and the story will get better (after all, Robin Hobb rated it 5 stars). Unfortunately, it didn’t. Not for me, at least.

    The idea behind the worldbuilding is great: there are 7 ruling families, whose members are virtually immortals, their souls being ‘reborn’ in another body after the current ones die. The famil

    I am so disappointed that my first encounter with Peter Newman’s work was such a letdown. I wanted to abandon it several times, but I kept going telling myself that something will improve, and the story will get better (after all, Robin Hobb rated it 5 stars). Unfortunately, it didn’t. Not for me, at least.

    The idea behind the worldbuilding is great: there are 7 ruling families, whose members are virtually immortals, their souls being ‘reborn’ in another body after the current ones die. The families are named after 7 gems (Sapphire, Tanzanite, Ruby, etc.) and they have crystal armors built (sort of an exoskeleton) from the respective gems, having wings and being able to fly.

    They live in floating castles, along the Godroad and beyond that, on the ground, there is the Wild, a cursed land, full of monsters. The families are bound to protect villages from the Wild and to keep the monsters at bay.

    It could have been a great story if the plot and characters would have been better written. Such a pity they were not. Everything seemed artificial: from the characters’ behavior to their actions, schemes and dialogues. It is true that not everything is explained in this volume and I guess in the sequels there is much to discover, but because I didn’t root for anybody in this volume, I don’t think I will continue with this series further.

    The writing also seemed flat to me, no passion in the words whatsoever, nothing to keep me on edge. There were moments that did spark my interest on a couple of occasions, but they were not pursued further or the scene was suddenly terminated and the narrative thread switched to something else half a page later.

    I don’t want to deter anybody from reading it; maybe I’m used to other writing style than Newman’s. It’s only that this one was not my cup of anything at all.

    >>> ARC received thanks to

    via NetGalley <<<

  • Lisa

    My thanks to Harper Voyager, and Netgalley.

    I've wanted to read this author for awhile now, but it wasn't a priority. Then I saw the ads for this, and I knew I had to read it!

    Fortunately, or unfortunately, depends I guess. I was given a preview copy for review, "for which I'm always grateful. This book sounded like the bomb! I think my main problem is that although I am someone who believes in the grey, meaning not black or white, this story was almost offensive to me. Folk are black and white

    My thanks to Harper Voyager, and Netgalley.

    I've wanted to read this author for awhile now, but it wasn't a priority. Then I saw the ads for this, and I knew I had to read it!

    Fortunately, or unfortunately, depends I guess. I was given a preview copy for review, "for which I'm always grateful. This book sounded like the bomb! I think my main problem is that although I am someone who believes in the grey, meaning not black or white, this story was almost offensive to me. Folk are black and white in this book. No, not literally. I mean they live high, "floating castles" or they live low, "with demons," on earth. Meanwhile, the low play as bait, luring demons and waiting for the privileged few to save them. What? That's offensive to me. People live in floating castles, and can live forever. When they die and are eventually reborn into their bloodline, meaning they push a soul out of its original form/body into who knows where, just so they can be reborn and live again. It's a silly thing, I know, but for me, who isn't religious, I worry about souls. not religious, but believe in the soul!😢😕 It's a freaking conundrum! Where does a lost soul go? I honestly didn't stay around enough to learn if Mr. Newman even addresses this issue. Even when I read stories like this, where arseholes rule above all, I can almost always find someone that I'll side with. That was not the case here. I'm my head, I just imagined me with an axe that never gets dull, and me just chopping. Like I'm Jack and the Giant beanstalk. Just chop, chop, chopping those castles down. I'm sorry, but I'll give most book 30 to 40%, but at this pace, if I've not found anyone I like, and moreover, I've found many that I despise, then I won't continue. I probably wouldn't read anything by this author again. Mostly because he does have quite a few books out. He should be seasoned by now. To my reckoning, he's just not that good. I will say that the writing was fine, and also the pacing. But, I just did not like this story. Would I recommend this? Dude, whatever floats your boat. I've read the reviews. Some like this and will continue with the series, others like me would prefer to choke to death on a mentholated sucrets before I had to read this again!

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