Ungovernable: The Victorian Parent's Guide to Raising Flawless Children

Ungovernable: The Victorian Parent's Guide to Raising Flawless Children

Feminist historian Therese Oneill is back, to educate you on what to expect when you're expecting . . . a Victorian baby! In Ungovernable, Oneill conducts an unforgettable tour through the backwards, pseudoscientific, downright bizarre parenting fashions of the Victorians, advising us on: - How to be sure you're not too ugly, sickly, or stupid to breed- What positions and...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Ungovernable: The Victorian Parent's Guide to Raising Flawless Children
Author:Therese Oneill
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Ungovernable: The Victorian Parent's Guide to Raising Flawless Children Reviews

  • Angela

    Just as tongue-in-cheek funny as the author's previous book on Victorian history, Unmentionable. I really hope she writes more of these! I listened to this one on audio and the narrators were FANTASTIC.

  • Cherie

    A fascinating historical review set in a humorous Q&A style format. The author does an excellent job of bringing to light the harsh realities of raising children in the Victorian era, and how it isn't anywhere near as simple as people might think. Battling ailments (like pinworm), unsafe medical practices (like using heroin to treat pregnancy hemorrhoids), sexism (like the assumption that women were incapable to even thinking when on their periods), and so much more, the author illustrates h

    A fascinating historical review set in a humorous Q&A style format. The author does an excellent job of bringing to light the harsh realities of raising children in the Victorian era, and how it isn't anywhere near as simple as people might think. Battling ailments (like pinworm), unsafe medical practices (like using heroin to treat pregnancy hemorrhoids), sexism (like the assumption that women were incapable to even thinking when on their periods), and so much more, the author illustrates how dangerous and unhealthy the Victorian era actually was. In fact, after reading this book, the only things I find appealing about the Victorian era are the clothes and the dialect.

    Set as a parody guide for parents, the author does a thorough comparison of the Victorian era's method of child-rearing in relation to today's world and our modern understanding of science, sociology, education, health, and technology. Because the format is Q&A, it's easy to digest in small tidbits. However, the fascinating information and humorous tone make it difficult to put down.

    The greatest value in this book is in the perspective it can bring to any parent that feels like they're trying their best, but doing everything wrong. After reading this book, they should be able grasp that they could be doing much, much.... MUCH worse, and hopefully get a little boost of self-esteem for the fact that they're actually trying in earnest.

    Highly recommended for parents, and those fascinated by history and the Victorian era.

  • Catherine Stein

    Like Unmentionable, this book was a brilliant blend of history and humor. The images and quotes from primary sources give a great insight into 19th century life, delivered with sarcastic wit. Lots of resources if you want to dig for further information.

  • Maren Anderson

    Ungovernable by Therese Oneill made me laugh out loud while I cringed and wondered how enough humans survived the Victorian age (or anytime previous) to populate this planet. It's a cross between Charles Dickens and Dr. Spock (not MR. Spock) but narrated by my understanding, yet wryly witty, lactation coach.

    This book takes the Bobsey Twins ideal of Victorian childhood and turns it on its ear. In a funny, patient, sardonic voice that isn't above also being aghast at the way children had to be rai

    Ungovernable by Therese Oneill made me laugh out loud while I cringed and wondered how enough humans survived the Victorian age (or anytime previous) to populate this planet. It's a cross between Charles Dickens and Dr. Spock (not MR. Spock) but narrated by my understanding, yet wryly witty, lactation coach.

    This book takes the Bobsey Twins ideal of Victorian childhood and turns it on its ear. In a funny, patient, sardonic voice that isn't above also being aghast at the way children had to be raised in the past, Oneill lists pre-germ theory beliefs of getting pregnant, having a baby, raising said baby to be tough enough to survive in a world without antibiotics.

    I'll tell you a quick story. My mother was living with and old, old relative named Pat who was a pioneer as a child in the 1890s. My mother had a sinus infection and was miserable. Pat said, "Quit whining! What would have happened to you in the pioneer days?" My mother said, "I literally would have died, Pat."

    That's this book, except funny.

  • Elizabeth

    Funny and irreverent, and highly informative, Therese Oneill has done it again! This fitting sequel to Unmentionable has a much different format and a slightly different tone, but I am happy to report that the snark is as strong as ever. In this unflinching look at Victorian parenting practices, told as a dialogue, many different aspects of parenting are explored. You might laugh, you might cry, but you’ll definitely learn something from this unforgettable historical sojourn. I would eagerly rea

    Funny and irreverent, and highly informative, Therese Oneill has done it again! This fitting sequel to Unmentionable has a much different format and a slightly different tone, but I am happy to report that the snark is as strong as ever. In this unflinching look at Victorian parenting practices, told as a dialogue, many different aspects of parenting are explored. You might laugh, you might cry, but you’ll definitely learn something from this unforgettable historical sojourn. I would eagerly read another installment in this wholly unique series.

  • Kayla

    This was the second book by Therese Oneill, and Ungovernable did not disappoint.

    Ungovernable is my favorite kind of Nonfiction book. Where you learn something you never knew, but in a ridiculous sort of way. It takes something that could be so clinical and dull, and cranks up the sass.

    I have been waiting for what feels like forever for this book. Last year I stumpled across Therese Oneill's book Unmentionables, and devoured it on my patio. So to find out she was writing another Victorian Era boo

    This was the second book by Therese Oneill, and Ungovernable did not disappoint.

    Ungovernable is my favorite kind of Nonfiction book. Where you learn something you never knew, but in a ridiculous sort of way. It takes something that could be so clinical and dull, and cranks up the sass.

    I have been waiting for what feels like forever for this book. Last year I stumpled across Therese Oneill's book Unmentionables, and devoured it on my patio. So to find out she was writing another Victorian Era book, but this time on child rearing, I was very much on board.

    I showed up the day my library said it was in and snatched it right off the "New Release" shelf. Then promptly finished my other books and set out a day to start next book, then read way past my bed time.

    Hands down my favorite part of this book is its format. It isn't just Therese Oneil telling us about raising children during the 19th Century. It's a question and answer session with a mother who wants to raise her kids the "Victorian Way". So there is a late of back and forth, a lot of reaction to the scenarios being presented.

    For me it has to stop the information overload. It also helps the book move along to subject to subject.

    I also really enjoy the captions under the photos. I may read ahead to the captions because they the best!

    It's a bit of hard book to read in public because there was a lot of laughing out loud, and I'm sure I pulled some great faces at certain parts. There's also the lovely ladies who read over your shoulder on the bus. Sure hope they got the pages about penises or assmilk. Nothing would give me greater pleasure.

    Ungovernable is also very well researched. Not just brcuase of theboages and pages of references in the back of the book. But, just how well the book flows. Therese Oneill knew what she was talking about, presented it well, and left me one burning question.

    How did our grandparents survive?

    It seems like literally everything was against them. It also did nothing but give me more reasons to not have children now, or then, or ever. I do have more respect for the women of the 19th Century though. So much respect...

    My only down side was honestly how fast I read this book. Cause now I'm left with a bit of book hangover despite an awesome TBR looming over me. But, I'm excited to see where Therese Oneill goes next.

    Buy, Borrow, or Skip: Anything that gets this book in your hands. I went the library route because I'm being "Cheap Sally" these days. My dad's words, not my own. But, I would love to both of Therese's books on my shelves. Cover-to-cover they are brilliant.

  • Dina

    **3.5 stars**

    I was interested to see that this book was getting significantly worse reviews than the author's first book,

    . And I think I can see why most readers found this uncomfortable reading...The Victorian times sucked.

    They were dark, filthy, disease-ridden times with backward, abusive and sexist thinking. And that makes people, who have often times idealized it (whether from TV shows or romance novels) to face the fac

    **3.5 stars**

    I was interested to see that this book was getting significantly worse reviews than the author's first book,

    . And I think I can see why most readers found this uncomfortable reading...The Victorian times sucked.

    They were dark, filthy, disease-ridden times with backward, abusive and sexist thinking. And that makes people, who have often times idealized it (whether from TV shows or romance novels) to face the fact that this was actually a miserable time to be anyone except a white, wealthy man of influence (oh how far we all have come...).

    But I think what many people who have read this book seem to struggle with, is that while it (tries) to write out history in an attempt at lightheartedness, it is still really dark and aggravating material to read about. Especially if you are looking at it through a 21st century lens (most of it is modern-day child abuse, but was the norm in the 1800's).

    I enjoyed it because it was educational, witty, and upfront about a lot of the realities that made up the Victorian era. It's not as laugh out loud funny as Unmentionable, but it is still a valuable collection of handpicked historical facts there to educate and inspire you to peruse these topics deeper.

    But if you are looking for a cheerful, 'aw-it-was-so-much-better-in-the-olden-days,' kind of book, look elsewhere. That kind of crap doesn't fly here.

  • Davina

    If Therese Oneill could lend her hilarious captions to all historical photos, I would be a very happy lady. This was a pretty funny read overall, but as many other goodreaders have pointed out, the Q&A format does not lend anything positive to this book and I think the topical approach in her last book was more effective.

  • Alicia

    Ugh.

    Isn't it frustrating when you're super excited about something and it doesn't meet your expectations? I'd had this on my TBR as soon as I saw that she was publishing another in her humorous exploration of Victorian times. Alas, this one didn't work out. Unmentionables-- loved and purchased for someone as a gift. This one-- grating and tiresome. Yes, I read it through (which I was going to abandon a few times), but because it provided some great primary source documentation of how "scientist

    Ugh.

    Isn't it frustrating when you're super excited about something and it doesn't meet your expectations? I'd had this on my TBR as soon as I saw that she was publishing another in her humorous exploration of Victorian times. Alas, this one didn't work out. Unmentionables-- loved and purchased for someone as a gift. This one-- grating and tiresome. Yes, I read it through (which I was going to abandon a few times), but because it provided some great primary source documentation of how "scientists", doctors, and families thought during this time, it's truly a gem. The research is immeasurable and for that I'm eternally grateful.

    It was the execution of said material that drove me insane. The Q&A style was not the way to go because it made the text super choppy with the bolded questions, oft-used ellipses as answers, and short and long responses. It felt like it was jumping around using that style while attempting to deliver it straightforward. Second, the humor was a little... much. Unmentionables balanced the humor with the delivery of content. This one was all humor with the content hidden (though there) with the overuse of humor including puns, raunchy language, and harping on specific topics. For example, yes "ass milk" = donkey's milk, but to continue to refer to it as ass milk was annoying after the second time. It's like most conversations with my youngest brother. Yes, heard it. Laughed the first time, let's not go back there again.

    Needless to say I was super disappointed not to love this one more on it's delivery alone. I wanted more substance and got too much stand-up instead.

  • Robin

    Victorian life was tough, back before child labor laws and science-based medicine. Kids were subject to beatings per the Bible, and given alcoholic and opiated medicines. Boys and girls were raised differently, with brutal competitive games for the boys and charm schooling for the girls. Odd beliefs about how to tell if one is pregnant abounded, since missing a period could be due to malnutrition, physical stress, or patent medicines. Superstitions about pregnancy (and it was quite unacceptable

    Victorian life was tough, back before child labor laws and science-based medicine. Kids were subject to beatings per the Bible, and given alcoholic and opiated medicines. Boys and girls were raised differently, with brutal competitive games for the boys and charm schooling for the girls. Odd beliefs about how to tell if one is pregnant abounded, since missing a period could be due to malnutrition, physical stress, or patent medicines. Superstitions about pregnancy (and it was quite unacceptable to use the word pregnancy) included sheltering a woman from seeing any sort of deformity, wild animals, or large fires, as these could cause undesirable attributes or appearance in the child.

    Yet with such fascinating odd beliefs of the era, the author failed to write an interesting book. Instead of sticking to the facts and embellishing them with wit, she pokes fun at the reader through an obnoxious Q & A format. The “reader” poses a few relevant questions to the author, but most questions aren’t questions at all. They sound like the reader is a brainless, reactive mess. The whole point of reading the book is to see how different things were in Victorian times, so why would the reader be overreacting to Victorian facts of life?

    does contain some enlightening facts, but the reader will have to search through the snarky fluff for them. This tends to devalue the content. But in fact, it would be a too-short book without the overdramatic schtick. Fans of the Victorian era who are good at skimming for content might get something out of this book, as I did.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.