Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass

Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass

Harleen is a tough, outspoken, rebellious kid who lives in a ramshackle apartment above a karaoke cabaret owned by a drag queen named MAMA. Ever since Harleen's parents split, MAMA has been her only family. When the cabaret becomes the next victim in the wave of gentrification that's taking over the neighborhood, Harleen gets mad.When Harleen decides to turn her anger into...

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Title:Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass
Author:Mariko Tamaki
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass Reviews

  • Juli

    Harleen is sent to Gotham to live with her grandmother, but her life takes a drastic turn once she gets there. The story unfolds as the teen makes decisions, starts to discover who she is, makes friends, and faces danger, unfairness and bad people.

    I love this new spin on a favorite character. Harley Quinn gets a bit of an update....she's facing current issues and learning as she goes. I like how she is portrayed as a strong, intelligent and driven teen, who also has some issues. She meets up

    Harleen is sent to Gotham to live with her grandmother, but her life takes a drastic turn once she gets there. The story unfolds as the teen makes decisions, starts to discover who she is, makes friends, and faces danger, unfairness and bad people.

    I love this new spin on a favorite character. Harley Quinn gets a bit of an update....she's facing current issues and learning as she goes. I like how she is portrayed as a strong, intelligent and driven teen, who also has some issues. She meets up with real evil....and makes some iffy decisions. The Joker is interesting and different in this story. At first, I just didn't want the character to be different. But as I saw more of the character and Harley's interactions with him, I found myself enjoying the change.

    There is one point in the story where Harley refuses to put on a skimpy outfit and designs her own instead. I love that! She refuses to walk around half naked to gratify anyone else.....and designs something she wants to wear. She isn't afraid to say NO, I'm not going to wear that. Love it!

    The storyline is well written and enjoyable. The artwork is great! Loved it! I'm curious where the story will go from here. I will definitely read the next graphic novel, if this continues as a series.

    **I voluntarily read an advanced reader copy of this book from DC Entertainment via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  • Cassie-la

    Part of the soon-to-be-defunct DC Ink imprint, this contemporary graphic novel tells the story of 15-year-old Harleen Quinzel, a recent Gotham arrival who is taken in by a drag club owner named Mama and her squadron of queens, befriends a plant-loving political activist named Ivy, and is beguiled by a mysterious anarchist calling himself the Joker. When gentrification comes to Harleen's neighborhood and threatens her loved one's livelihoods, it's up to this lovable, quirky teen to save the

    Part of the soon-to-be-defunct DC Ink imprint, this contemporary graphic novel tells the story of 15-year-old Harleen Quinzel, a recent Gotham arrival who is taken in by a drag club owner named Mama and her squadron of queens, befriends a plant-loving political activist named Ivy, and is beguiled by a mysterious anarchist calling himself the Joker. When gentrification comes to Harleen's neighborhood and threatens her loved one's livelihoods, it's up to this lovable, quirky teen to save the community she now calls home. Full of a lively cast of new and familiar characters, Tamaki's wholly unique story paired with illustrator Steve Pugh's bewitching artwork will have you itching for a sequel to this brand-new Harley Quinn origin story.

  • Noura Khalid (theperksofbeingnoura)

    Thank you DC Ink for gifting me with a free ARC in exchange for an honest review!

    Harley has always been one of my favorites from the DC universe. I was looking forward to this graphic novel for so long, and I was so happy to have the chance to read and review it.

    The art style was amazing, and the story was fun to follow. It was nice to see a standalone of hers. Harley was fun and had her quirky qualities on display throughout the entire book which I loved. We got a glimpse of Ivy too who is

    Thank you DC Ink for gifting me with a free ARC in exchange for an honest review!

    Harley has always been one of my favorites from the DC universe. I was looking forward to this graphic novel for so long, and I was so happy to have the chance to read and review it.

    The art style was amazing, and the story was fun to follow. It was nice to see a standalone of hers. Harley was fun and had her quirky qualities on display throughout the entire book which I loved. We got a glimpse of Ivy too who is biracial and an activist for all the right things. The story mostly follows Harley while she protects her neighborhood from being bulldozed. Of course this is very different from her origin story but it's quite fun if you don't know the character very much and it'll probably appeal to younger readers.

  • Chad

    First off, let me just say these DC Ink books are typically YA Elseworlds books and that's what we have here. This is the best one of the bunch yet. Probably because this was actually written by a comic book writer who actually knows something about the nature of the character involved and not just a YA novelist.

    Harley is sent to Gotham to live with her Grandmother while her mom works on a cruise ship. When she gets there, she finds out her Grandmother has passed away but the super decides to

    First off, let me just say these DC Ink books are typically YA Elseworlds books and that's what we have here. This is the best one of the bunch yet. Probably because this was actually written by a comic book writer who actually knows something about the nature of the character involved and not just a YA novelist.

    Harley is sent to Gotham to live with her Grandmother while her mom works on a cruise ship. When she gets there, she finds out her Grandmother has passed away but the super decides to let her stay in her Grandmother's apartment as long as she goes to school. The super is a sweet middle aged drag queen and Harley ends up hanging out with all his buddies at their performances. It's actually a lot of fun. Versions of Poison Ivy and the Joker appear as the story progresses, but the main focus is that the Kane family is buying up all the real estate in the neighborhood and forcing everyone out. The story is well written, dealing with issues of social justice. Harley doesn't always make the right choices, but she is a strong, independent character who isn't swayed by others. The only thing I didn't care for was the ending. It feels unfinished. I'm sure there are plans for a sequel but that probably won't be for a long time given the length of this. I would have preferred a more definitive stopping point.

    Steve Pugh produces some of the best art of his career. He handled everything except the lettering. I love his choice of muted monochromatic colors. It gives the book a color penciled that I adored.

  • Jordanne

    First, a thank you to Edelweiss and DC Ink for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    This is set up to become a fantastic origin / coming-of-age story for Harleen Quinzel. The writer captures the ‘voice’ of our tough, outspoken and sometimes rebellious protagonist brilliantly and I can already tell this will be a brilliant book you can give to any Harley fan.

    This first issue is told entirely by Harley as a prelude to the series, and it carries a great subversive fairy

    First, a thank you to Edelweiss and DC Ink for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    This is set up to become a fantastic origin / coming-of-age story for Harleen Quinzel. The writer captures the ‘voice’ of our tough, outspoken and sometimes rebellious protagonist brilliantly and I can already tell this will be a brilliant book you can give to any Harley fan.

    This first issue is told entirely by Harley as a prelude to the series, and it carries a great subversive fairy tale vibe from the start and introduced key players in her life including Mama (her drag queen patron) and Poison Ivy (her future best friend and partner in crime).

    This will be a great book to give to young girls especially since, unlike her older far more insane alter ego, I actually feel Harleen is a decent, relatable role model that if handled correctly, could offer didactic and introspective messages to young women. The story centres on a very different Harley that most people expect.

    The art by Steve Pugh (The Flintstones) is different from any I’ve read so far but I think it suited the story perfectly and I adored how even though she isn’t yet Harley Quinn, her aesthetic was incorporated into her street clothes subtly and in keeping with how I can actually imagine a young Harley dressing.

    This book was published under the imprint DC Ink, a new line of original comics aimed at young adults aged 13 to 17 (with a pretty awesome array of authors from that genre too) and if Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass is anything to go by, I think DC are going to achieve all there are setting out to with this new line. I will definitely be following it closely.

    Writing Quality – 9/10

    Image/Illustration Quality – 8/10

    Character Development – 8/10

    Overall – 8/10

    Find my full review on my blog,

    .

  • David Schaafsma

    Great dialogue from Mariko Tamaki and great art from Steve Pugh in what appears to be a new Elseworlds series featuring a new origin story of Harley Quinn. Answers the question: Which superheroes might be tweaked to have particular appeal to an inclusive, queer community? Harley moves out of her house after her parents' divorce, befriends (Poison) Ivy, meets a kind of wild (but not Dark Knight-style psychotic) Joker who is mainly just bored and wants to stir things up. She's attracted to him, of

    Great dialogue from Mariko Tamaki and great art from Steve Pugh in what appears to be a new Elseworlds series featuring a new origin story of Harley Quinn. Answers the question: Which superheroes might be tweaked to have particular appeal to an inclusive, queer community? Harley moves out of her house after her parents' divorce, befriends (Poison) Ivy, meets a kind of wild (but not Dark Knight-style psychotic) Joker who is mainly just bored and wants to stir things up. She's attracted to him, of course.

    Harley is kind of nice, a little alternative, whereas Ivy is an out-there angry activist, connected to a community garden, leading the charge in a kind of lame story about gentrification I just read and am already forgetting. Let me try: Harley gets to live with Mama, an older, lovable drag queen whose club is being taken over by some evil corporation. So now she's sad, needs a hug. Those mean gentrifiers!

    The community Harley connects to in this version is fun; so it's the fun Queer Eye drag queen world where she develops her sense of style, with the help of some affordable Dollar Store kitsch. There's always a bit of teen railing (led by Ivy, mainly) in this volume against "The Man": for instance, Ivy screams about a white rich boy Gotham High School film club that is only interested in white male classic films from the likes of Hitchcock and Truffaut. Whaddya mean there are no good films by women directors?!

    The vibe for this particular version of Harley world is PC, social justice, housing issues, queer-friendly, and again, stamped with Tamaki humor and great Pugh art. Maybe 3.5, rated down to 3 for the story I wanted to like but felt stereotypical. I'll read on, though.

  • Madison Warner Fairbanks

    Great artwork. DC comics origin story for Harley Quinn.

    The story introduces Harley and drag queen Mama and friend Ivy.

    High school years are tough on everyone. Harley wants to help Ivy and Film club and the neighborhood but the Joker’s idea of helping isn’t so nice.

    Includes several back scenes of Harley and her mother, and quotes that Harley remembers as being pivotal life challenges.

    I’ll not a fan of violence or swearing or fighting or bullies. This story is full of all those things. While

    Great artwork. DC comics origin story for Harley Quinn.

    The story introduces Harley and drag queen Mama and friend Ivy.

    High school years are tough on everyone. Harley wants to help Ivy and Film club and the neighborhood but the Joker’s idea of helping isn’t so nice.

    Includes several back scenes of Harley and her mother, and quotes that Harley remembers as being pivotal life challenges.

    I’ll not a fan of violence or swearing or fighting or bullies. This story is full of all those things. While the prescribed age is 13 to 17, I feel this is more adult material than impressionable teens.

  • Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    This was okay. One of those books I think I would have enjoyed a lot more if I was about 10 or so years younger? It read like a YA novel.

    Many Harley Quinn stories don’t really work for me. In fact, the only one I remember enjoying a lot was Preludes and Knock Knock Jokes - no story aside from that one have really made me love reading about this character. This dialogue reads like it was made for a much younger audience and that’s just fine.

    The story is the plot of many “feel good” stories. The

    This was okay. One of those books I think I would have enjoyed a lot more if I was about 10 or so years younger? It read like a YA novel.

    Many Harley Quinn stories don’t really work for me. In fact, the only one I remember enjoying a lot was Preludes and Knock Knock Jokes - no story aside from that one have really made me love reading about this character. This dialogue reads like it was made for a much younger audience and that’s just fine.

    The story is the plot of many “feel good” stories. The neighborhood is trying to save their local establishments from gentrification as a big bad corporation comes in and tries to buy up and bulldoze all the land. Ivy is one of the protesters. As is Mama, a local drag queen that becomes Harley’s (not so legal) guardian.

    It’s a pretty basic story. I like the art a lot. Overall, not a bad story, just not quite what I enjoy from a Harley Quinn book.

  • Rod Brown

    I've never really been a fan of Harley Quinn. I get how she is appealing as a side character, good for a laugh, but the books she headlines are usually as lifeless and dull as this one.

    Here we have a revamped Elseworlds-style origin story that has Harleen Quinzel becoming Harley in high school when she gets involved with a community activist named Ivy and a local business owner whose drag queen venue is being crushed by evil real estate developers. And there's a weak ass version of Joker

    I've never really been a fan of Harley Quinn. I get how she is appealing as a side character, good for a laugh, but the books she headlines are usually as lifeless and dull as this one.

    Here we have a revamped Elseworlds-style origin story that has Harleen Quinzel becoming Harley in high school when she gets involved with a community activist named Ivy and a local business owner whose drag queen venue is being crushed by evil real estate developers. And there's a weak ass version of Joker (definitely not your father's Joker, kids) running around doing a whole lot of nothing with a very easily guessed secret identity.

    It's a shame this mediocrity of a story is draped over some of Steve Pugh's most gorgeous art ever.

    Reviewed from an Advance Reader's Copy.

  • Scott

    -- Harley, on page 156 (inadvertently giving my review)

    I think the mistake of

    was hitching its wagon to the known quantities of Harley Quinn and Joker - they are not particularly 'kid friendly' characters to begin with (unless perhaps you are offspring of the Manson Family), though they are presented here in teenage incarnations as in the other DC Ink titles - when it could probably stand on its own as an original and energetic YA-type

    -- Harley, on page 156 (inadvertently giving my review)

    I think the mistake of

    was hitching its wagon to the known quantities of Harley Quinn and Joker - they are not particularly 'kid friendly' characters to begin with (unless perhaps you are offspring of the Manson Family), though they are presented here in teenage incarnations as in the other DC Ink titles - when it could probably stand on its own as an original and energetic YA-type of story. Also hit-or-miss were some of the supporting characters - the uppity and then predictably villainous family was very sneer-worthy and Harley's adopted squad of caretakers were humorous, but that always-angry best friend / classmate Ivy was just intolerable with her one-track mind. (She seemed either stereotypical or just written in a pandering manner - I'm not sure which.) So it was not as much fun as it could have been, but at least the illustrations were consistently good throughout.

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