Abbott

Abbott

While investigating police brutality and corruption in 1970s Detroit, journalist Elena Abbott uncovers supernatural forces being controlled by a secret society of the city’s elite.In the uncertain social and political climate of 1972 Detroit, hard-nosed, chain-smoking tabloid reporter Elena Abbott investigates a series of grisly crimes that the police have ignored. Crimes...

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Title:Abbott
Author:Saladin Ahmed
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Abbott Reviews

  • Eli

    Read this one (a little too late) for

    .

    Oh, my god. I really loved this. I need the second volume in my grubby hands right now. I really haven't been this interested in a non-superhero graphic novel since like

    or

    . This did have some

    vibes, though. Anyone who loved that should definitely give this a shot.

    One of the biggest differences from

    is that this takes place in 1970s Detroit, told from the perspective of a controversial Bla

    Read this one (a little too late) for

    .

    Oh, my god. I really loved this. I need the second volume in my grubby hands right now. I really haven't been this interested in a non-superhero graphic novel since like

    or

    . This did have some

    vibes, though. Anyone who loved that should definitely give this a shot.

    One of the biggest differences from

    is that this takes place in 1970s Detroit, told from the perspective of a controversial Black female journalist (controversial only because she's calling out police brutality, racism, and police coverups in her articles). I really loved this about

    . I just finished reading a book about the intersectionality of race and gender, so I had no problem with the not-so-subtle racism and sexism Elena Abbott had to endure [solely for the fact that it paints an accurate picture of racism and sexism in the 1970s].

    , the main character, a woman of color in the 1970s, is

    .

    So this was an absolute win on all fronts for me. Can't wait to read the next one!

  • chantel nouseforaname

    One of the best comic series I've read in a while. Beautiful artwork, a fantastic story about this badass female journalist who's battling evil forces. Set in the '70s. Written magnificently. Illustrations are amazing. Well worth the read. I read each installment at different points over the past two months, but this series on a whole is perfect. Get into it.

  • Skye Kilaen

    The main character, Elena Abbott, is a bi black woman journalist in 1972 Detroit who also fights the occult forces of evil. Was there a chance I'd skip reading this graphic novel? No. And while I thought the villain was maybe a tiny smidge too cheesy, overall I enjoyed this a lot and would order a sequel in a heartbeat.

  • Chad

    Damn, I have to say I was really impressed with this. It's about a black female reporter in Detroit 1972. Not only does she have to deal with racism and sexism but she gets involved unwittingly with the supernatural as well. The dialogue and settings can be rough. I'm not disparaging the author here. It's just that I'd like to punch a few of the misogynistic and racist jerks in the book. I really liked the supernatural element to the book and since Elena Abbott is new to it as well, the reader f

    Damn, I have to say I was really impressed with this. It's about a black female reporter in Detroit 1972. Not only does she have to deal with racism and sexism but she gets involved unwittingly with the supernatural as well. The dialogue and settings can be rough. I'm not disparaging the author here. It's just that I'd like to punch a few of the misogynistic and racist jerks in the book. I really liked the supernatural element to the book and since Elena Abbott is new to it as well, the reader finds answers as Abbott does. the art and coloring work really well with the feel of the book and set the mood. I'm really looking forward to more adventures set in this world.

  • Schizanthus

    is a 2019 Hugo Awards finalist in the

    category.

    I’m not sure how to talk about this graphic novel without providing some information about the plot, so …

    : potential spoilers ahead!

    This is Elena Abbott.

    She’s a reporter for the Detroit Daily and as a black woman in 1972, she’s practically surrounded by racist and misogynistic white men. The newspaper board members and most of the police force aren’t exactly thrilled about her reporting the truth, particularly

    is a 2019 Hugo Awards finalist in the

    category.

    I’m not sure how to talk about this graphic novel without providing some information about the plot, so …

    : potential spoilers ahead!

    This is Elena Abbott.

    She’s a reporter for the Detroit Daily and as a black woman in 1972, she’s practically surrounded by racist and misogynistic white men. The newspaper board members and most of the police force aren’t exactly thrilled about her reporting the truth, particularly when it involves police brutality.

    Having barely begun her new investigation into some eerily similar and grisly murders, Abbott discovers the perpetrators aren’t the usual suspects (hint: the police force’s usual suspects aren’t white). Instead, Abbott is soon face to face with a supernatural blast from the past.

    Abbott tries to tell James, both a police sergeant and her ex-husband, about the shadows she sees on the second body.

    They’re the same shadows that she saw on her husband, Samir, when he died. He called them the Umbra. Abbott seeks help from Sebastian, who tells her to stop running from her calling.

    Abbott is a chain smoker who enjoys her daily two glasses of brandy and drives a 1966 V8 Mustang. I got the feeling she’s not typically a huge believer in the whole ‘calling’ thing.

    Later, Abbott has a conversation with Amelia, who has a message of her own. One that involves a gun. Amelia also happens to be romantically involved with Abbott but Abbott’s keeping this under wraps right now.

    I was hit with so much information in the beginning of this graphic novel. I didn’t know how it would all fit together and I wasn’t sure I would care when it did. Then I met my first shadow monster and it was all over for me from that moment on; I needed to keep reading.

    Much like

    , which I’ve recently binged for my Hugo readathon, it seems like it’s not a good idea to become emotionally involved with any of the characters in

    . My two favourite characters didn’t survive this graphic novel but, although I’m preparing to harden my heart as we speak, I hadn’t grown to love them yet.

    I’m giving this graphic novel ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ instead of ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ for two reasons: it took a while for the story to get its hooks into me and I don’t desperately need a sequel, even though I’m left with some unanswered questions and loose ends. Overall though, this was a very entertaining read.

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  • Roy

    I'd beem impressed with some of Ahmeds previous work. You can tell Ahmed really knows reporting and the city. I just didn't feel that interested in the overall plot. Journalist mixed up in some killings but involves supernatural elements. A slight noir nod but not at the level of Brubaker.

  • Shannon Appelcline

    This comic has an enthralling premise: 1973 Detroit, where a black newswoman is caught up in the occult. This could have been a great period piece, and there's some good work on racism and sexism in the '70s, just when things were beginning to change. This could have been a good noir piece, but it really doesn't do much for the genre. In fact, overall,

    is a bit slow and a bit unoriginal. Oh, there's some good content here, but not necessarily enough to leave you begging for more.

  • James DeSantis

    Part of this book I love and the other part...not so much.

    So Abbott is a news reporter. She's actually really badass in her approach, similar to characters like Jessica Jones, she takes no shit from anyone. So when she begins reporting things of police brutality she begins to make enemies. However, what is really chasing her? Demons? Half human half creature visions begin to haunt her. Can she escape? Will the demons kill her or will the people in her life try to hurt her more?

    It's a dark tale

    Part of this book I love and the other part...not so much.

    So Abbott is a news reporter. She's actually really badass in her approach, similar to characters like Jessica Jones, she takes no shit from anyone. So when she begins reporting things of police brutality she begins to make enemies. However, what is really chasing her? Demons? Half human half creature visions begin to haunt her. Can she escape? Will the demons kill her or will the people in her life try to hurt her more?

    It's a dark tale. Some of it I love, mostly the stuff with the newspaper, the police brutality reports, the characters and side cast give a lot of emotion through them. All of that works. The supernatural stuff? The least interesting part. I get the idea behind it and what it represents but I hardly cared about it and the main "villain" is pretty poorly done.

    Overall good, interesting, ballsy, but not always working for me. A 3 out of 5.

  • Rod Brown

    A newspaper reporter who takes their own photos while reluctantly and ineptly fighting supernatural beings in the 1970s? I could not get

    out of my head the whole time I was reading this. Kolchak is now a tough as nails African American female named Abbott in order to get a little of 1970s blaxploitation films into the mix too, but still enjoyable as ever.

    There was a little awkwardness in the writing as all the characters and their situations are introduced, but the cli

    A newspaper reporter who takes their own photos while reluctantly and ineptly fighting supernatural beings in the 1970s? I could not get

    out of my head the whole time I was reading this. Kolchak is now a tough as nails African American female named Abbott in order to get a little of 1970s blaxploitation films into the mix too, but still enjoyable as ever.

    There was a little awkwardness in the writing as all the characters and their situations are introduced, but the cliches and occasional clunkiness sort of play into the whole throwback homage.

    I would like to see a second volume.

  • Elizabeth A

    Life in Detriot circa 1972 is already hard for many, and to make matters worse some grisly and frankly bizarre murders are suddenly happening. The thing is that the cops don't seem all that interested, but fear not, Elena Abbott, is going to get to the bottom of what's going on. Sure she has to deal with the expected racism and sexism, and if that wasn't enough to make her mad, there's a supernatural element at play, but no-one believes her. It's enough to make a girl chain smoke and drink her w

    Life in Detriot circa 1972 is already hard for many, and to make matters worse some grisly and frankly bizarre murders are suddenly happening. The thing is that the cops don't seem all that interested, but fear not, Elena Abbott, is going to get to the bottom of what's going on. Sure she has to deal with the expected racism and sexism, and if that wasn't enough to make her mad, there's a supernatural element at play, but no-one believes her. It's enough to make a girl chain smoke and drink her way to oblivion, but Elena has more grit than that.

    I really liked the premise, the diversity on the page, and the unusual POV of this comic. The art is really good too, but the plot and dialog felt a tad clunky. Did I get all nostalgic about investigative journalism. Yes. Would I read the next volume? Yes I would. So there's that.

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