The Light Beyond the Forest: The Quest for the Holy Grail

The Light Beyond the Forest: The Quest for the Holy Grail

A retelling of the adventures of King Arthur's knights, Sir Lancelot, Sir Galahad, Sir Bors, and Sir Percival, as they search for the Holy Grail....

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Light Beyond the Forest: The Quest for the Holy Grail
Author:Rosemary Sutcliff
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Light Beyond the Forest: The Quest for the Holy Grail Reviews

  • Electro Cat

    MAGIIIIIIIIIC!

  • Nikki

    I do love Rosemary Sutcliff's writing style for this trilogy: gently magical, in a way that suits it very well. I actually like her Lancelot, which is a feat, because I'm not overly fond of Lancelot in general, and of his story, so the portrayals of him that I love are the odd ones out... I like the tenderness with which Sutcliff wrote about him and his feelings, and his difficulty with no longer being the best knight, and yet the relationship he builds with his son... It's lovely. I sympathised

    I do love Rosemary Sutcliff's writing style for this trilogy: gently magical, in a way that suits it very well. I actually like her Lancelot, which is a feat, because I'm not overly fond of Lancelot in general, and of his story, so the portrayals of him that I love are the odd ones out... I like the tenderness with which Sutcliff wrote about him and his feelings, and his difficulty with no longer being the best knight, and yet the relationship he builds with his son... It's lovely. I sympathised with him a lot, in this rendition.

    I also like the way she treats Gawain -- he has the temper common to a lot of portrayals, and yet he's not unsympathetic.

    I love the bittersweetness of this story: the brightness of Camelot and the honour of the knights and the sense of final great things before darkness. It's lovely.

  • Jerry

    This is a book of the King Arthur legends. The main character is Sir Lancelot, Percival, Bohrs, and Galahad. Lancelot finds out that the knight Galahad was his son. He pulled a sword out of a rock that was meant for best of all knights and sat at the chair that he was destined to sit in the Round Table. The story goes on about a quest to get a grail. It follows Sir lancelot, Percivals, and Bors. The story ends with Lancelot and Galahad spending time together. Theis is a very good book. I would r

    This is a book of the King Arthur legends. The main character is Sir Lancelot, Percival, Bohrs, and Galahad. Lancelot finds out that the knight Galahad was his son. He pulled a sword out of a rock that was meant for best of all knights and sat at the chair that he was destined to sit in the Round Table. The story goes on about a quest to get a grail. It follows Sir lancelot, Percivals, and Bors. The story ends with Lancelot and Galahad spending time together. Theis is a very good book. I would recommend this book to someone.

  • Tatiana Gomez

    The second of Sutcliff's Arthurian saga trilogy meant for younger readers.

    This book focuses heavily on the otherworldly while weaving together, in chapters with alternating protagonists, the quests of those knights who followed the Holy Grail. The writing is magical in its ability to transport you an the Arthurian world rife with spiritual (both Christian and pagan) encounters. One of the greatest feats of this book is bringing to life mystical experiences in profound and moving ways

    The second of Sutcliff's Arthurian saga trilogy meant for younger readers.

    This book focuses heavily on the otherworldly while weaving together, in chapters with alternating protagonists, the quests of those knights who followed the Holy Grail. The writing is magical in its ability to transport you an the Arthurian world rife with spiritual (both Christian and pagan) encounters. One of the greatest feats of this book is bringing to life mystical experiences in profound and moving ways; even as they are not entirely believable, they are relevant in symbolism for the Arthurian world as much as for us today.

    I also enjoyed getting acquainted with many nuances of the Arthurian legend concerning many of the knights that I had not encountered before in other retellings of the Athurian myth.

    As always, Sutcliff's subtle writing shines with beauty and precision and will leave you longing for more.

  • SmokingMirror

    Even the wonderful Rosemary Sutcliff cnnnot ultimately save the tale of the quest for the Holy Grail, though her characterization of most of the knights is compelling and gripping. Except for Galahad, of course. Her Galahad is a beautiful young man, and still annoying with his unearned, and often unproved, goodness. Since he is destined to be

    Grail Knight, the rest of us can follow along and enjoy the deeds of the knights who are flawed and doubt themselves. Why do so many awful things happen t

    Even the wonderful Rosemary Sutcliff cnnnot ultimately save the tale of the quest for the Holy Grail, though her characterization of most of the knights is compelling and gripping. Except for Galahad, of course. Her Galahad is a beautiful young man, and still annoying with his unearned, and often unproved, goodness. Since he is destined to be

    Grail Knight, the rest of us can follow along and enjoy the deeds of the knights who are flawed and doubt themselves. Why do so many awful things happen to knights whose actions don't warrant such suffering?

    The question may be addressed by the Celtic sources Ms. Sutcliff urges the reader to consider while reading her rendition. Referring in memory to my beloved novel by Naomi Mitchison

    deepened

    for me. I don't know that the Grail Quest in any version is merely a ham-fisted Christian morality tale--the mystical Celtic or pre-Celtic antecedents usually are evident. But Galahad achieves by grace alone, apparently, what no other knight can, and it seems like an unfair predestinarianism, and boring too.

    But please read Rosemary Sutcliff's book. I could scarcely put it down.

  • Amy

    My oldest said this was very realistic, gruesome even, but she appreciated how real it felt.

  • Meredith

    King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table embark upon the quest for the Holy Grail, ushering in the twilight of Camelot.

    . Götterdämmerung always saddens me. The grail quest marks the beginning of the end for King Arthur's court. So many of the best knights were lost or destroyed by it that I always found it tragic rather than heroic. Even Sirs Bors, who together with Sir Galahad and Sir Percival, achieved the Quest for the Holy Grail feels that it was more bi/>Everything

    King Arthur's Knights of the Round Table embark upon the quest for the Holy Grail, ushering in the twilight of Camelot.

    . Götterdämmerung always saddens me. The grail quest marks the beginning of the end for King Arthur's court. So many of the best knights were lost or destroyed by it that I always found it tragic rather than heroic. Even Sirs Bors, who together with Sir Galahad and Sir Percival, achieved the Quest for the Holy Grail feels that it was more bitter than sweet upon his return to Camelot.

    (page 148)

    Because Sir Galahad is predestined to fulfill the quest, it never made sense to me that the other knights would attempt something at which they were destined to fail, but the author does her best to provide plausible motivation.

    (pages 19 -- 20)

    This story humanizes Sir Lancelot. Much of it is from his point of view, and the reader gets to experience his inner life rather than witness his great deeds.

    (page 36). To his own great sorrow, Lancelot loses both these thing during the Quest for the Grail.

    Shortly before Galahad arrives at Camelot, a sword set in a stone mysteriously appears on the riverbank. Its crossguard bears an inscription stating that the only

    shall be able to draw the sword from the stone. Prompted by misapprehension, Lancelot refuses to attempt to pull the sword from the stone, but his son Galahad, having taken the Seat Perilous, easily draws it forth, which declares him "the best knight in the world" in Lancelot's stead. Shortly thereafter, for the first time in his life, Lancelot suffers defeat. He is unhorsed by Sir Galahad, and then he is bested by other challengers in the encounters that follow. And so, he has lost one of the things that he holds most dear.

    The discovery that God has denied him the Grail Quest because of his adulterous love for Queen Guenever follows close behind. Interestingly, in this retelling, it is never explicitly stated that Lancelot's and Guenever's love has been consummated, so he may be being punished for something on which he never acted. (Perhaps, this is what is meant by "sinning in one's own heart" or "sinning by thought.") Lancelot confesses his sin to a priest and forswears indulging his sinful passion by thought or by deed. Thus, he gains absolution but loses the second of the two thing most dear to him.

    By the close of the story, Sir Lancelot is a broken man suffering intensely. He has physically deteriorated as decades worth of combat and combat-related injuries have caught up with him. He is no longer "the best knight in the world." His failure during the Quest of the Grail has taken a great psychological and emotional toll, and he is unable to find comfort in his illicit love for Guenever. I pitied him in his fall from grace as I have never done in other versions of the story that I read.

  • Pippin

    Disjointed. Some wild tales in there, but not a satisfying story.

  • The Idle Woman

    3.5 stars.

    I haven’t yet read The Sword and the Circle, the first part of Rosemary Sutcliff’s retelling of the legends of King Arthur, but the trilogy really doesn’t need to be read in sequence. The Light Beyond the Forest is a children’s novel, yet it’s one written with grace and poetic sensitivity (as is everything by Sutcliff), telling the story of the Grail Quest. Thereby it tackles some fairly weighty issues: trust, honour, truth, loyalty, temptation, sacrifice and evil. If I’d r

    3.5 stars.

    I haven’t yet read The Sword and the Circle, the first part of Rosemary Sutcliff’s retelling of the legends of King Arthur, but the trilogy really doesn’t need to be read in sequence. The Light Beyond the Forest is a children’s novel, yet it’s one written with grace and poetic sensitivity (as is everything by Sutcliff), telling the story of the Grail Quest. Thereby it tackles some fairly weighty issues: trust, honour, truth, loyalty, temptation, sacrifice and evil. If I’d read it as a child, I think I’d have been deeply impressed by its grandeur; reading it now, I’m struck by its lyrical simplicity and by the way it boils down a complex mix of Christian and pagan legends into a highly readable story...

    For the full review, please see my blog:

  • Jan-Maat

    Of the trilogy this is the volume that I have the tenderest memories of possibly because it was the first one that I read - our access to bookshops was haphazard as a child and with libraries and schools you get to read what you can get your hands on.

    I was surprised when I was older and read the medieval

    just how close in tone this was to the original, although lacking the craziness of the original - I blame Malory and our terrible desire to take stories too se

    Of the trilogy this is the volume that I have the tenderest memories of possibly because it was the first one that I read - our access to bookshops was haphazard as a child and with libraries and schools you get to read what you can get your hands on.

    I was surprised when I was older and read the medieval

    just how close in tone this was to the original, although lacking the craziness of the original - I blame Malory and our terrible desire to take stories too seriously.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.