Home Remedies

Home Remedies

In twelve stunning stories of love, family, and identity, Xuan Juliana Wang’s debut collection captures the unheard voices of an emerging generation. Young, reckless, and catapulted toward uncertain futures, here is the new face of Chinese youth on a quest for every kind of freedom.From a crowded apartment on Mott Street, where an immigrant family raises its first real Ame...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Home Remedies
Author:Xuan Juliana Wang
Rating:

Home Remedies Reviews

  • Lolly K Dandeneau

    via my blog:

    'It’s what Taoyu wanted, to disappear from Hai’s life completely, to leave a wound that would ache. That was the only way they could be equals.'

    Home Remedies is a gorgeous collection of stories about Chinese immigration, family structure, love, sex and the privilege of choices. The future for each character is never certain, and splits open guiding them to places they never imagined they would be. Home, some make their way in American life with

    via my blog:

    'It’s what Taoyu wanted, to disappear from Hai’s life completely, to leave a wound that would ache. That was the only way they could be equals.'

    Home Remedies is a gorgeous collection of stories about Chinese immigration, family structure, love, sex and the privilege of choices. The future for each character is never certain, and splits open guiding them to places they never imagined they would be. Home, some make their way in American life with ease, abandoning their old skins and sometimes their family too. Others cling to the old ways of a country they will never return to. One thing is certain, each person will make their own story, even if it means becoming someone other than what’s expected.

    In White Tiger of the West, the world is weary of Grandmasters, there no longer seems to be a place for spirituality but for one obedient little girl Grandmaster Tu could be the very thing that awakens a tiger, and gives her the flight of freedom. Home Remedies of the old involved tonics, tinctures, herbs… but in one story remedies are cleverly applied to survive say, a “bilingual heart” and “self-doubt”. Olympic divers are one in Vaulting the Sea, but what love is equal? Just how much can you meld yourself to another? I thought this was a beautifully painful tale of love and rejection, if any story is about identity it was this one. My favorite and most heart-breaking is Algorithmic Problem Solving for Father-Daughter Relationships. Logic as the meaning, the answer to all of lives obstacles simple application of algorithms “a theory that proves itself day after day” until a former professor, clueless father needs to solve the new problem of his daughter Wendy, who “I somehow managed to drive away from me.” My heart! By far the best story within!

    In this collection time stands still or rushes past. Characters are emerging into a bright future or retiring from their dreams, wearing clothes of the dead, or slicing through water in perfect sync. Sometimes they are just suffering through an “unremarkable period” of their life. It is stories about the youth, but the old have their say too, it’s like they live in different worlds sometimes. Moving, strange, exciting, biting… fantastic.

    Publication Date: May 14, 2019

    Crown Publishing

    Hogarth

  • Aaron

    One of my favorite sensations as a reader is stumbling across something perfect and unexpected, something you weren't looking for and never knew you needed, and you come away feeling richer for the experience.

    does that, repeatedly, with each strange little slice of life feeling like a concentrated burst of observation, a window into a truly strange stranger's head, rendering a consistently alien experience somehow relatable, while your brain marinates in a stew of subtle details t

    One of my favorite sensations as a reader is stumbling across something perfect and unexpected, something you weren't looking for and never knew you needed, and you come away feeling richer for the experience.

    does that, repeatedly, with each strange little slice of life feeling like a concentrated burst of observation, a window into a truly strange stranger's head, rendering a consistently alien experience somehow relatable, while your brain marinates in a stew of subtle details that feel

    even when you're not entirely sure what they all mean.

    What we have here, in simple terms, is a collection of short stories written by a Chinese-American author. We consistently see tales of emigration--families, children, students, hustlers, and others leaving China to restart their lives in the United States--and what that feels like for all involved. We also see China from a perspective few Americans could conjure on their own, the kind of perspective born from some kind of lived experience--whether first-hand or absorbed from family and friends, I'm not entirely sure, but it certainly feels real as you read. As I dug deeper into the book, I felt the weight of Chinese culture looming in the background, in ways I hadn't expected and ways I can't really articulate in a short review.

    I realize as I read all that back it sounds like I'm describing a travelogue, but

    isn't that at all. It's a swirl of characters built out of bundled observations, little bursts of thought and feeling, all perfectly rendered, somehow cohering into a series of tiny stories, but stories built on the backs of human-sized lives, if that makes sense. Xuan Juliana Wang experiments with form several times throughout the book, sometimes employing impressionistic lists but just as often keeping things straightforward on the structural front only to swerve into magical realism to keep us on our toes. It's a cop-out to point to Raymond Carver when describing good short fiction, but I think there's a reasonable parallel here to the extent Wang is able to do so much with so little, to leave only a few threads on the page but lace those threads with mystique, heart, detachment, longing, unease, humor, millennial ennui, i.e., the stuff of life. Her characters are traced in electric prose but carved in relief, silhouettes painted on the page with just enough detail, just enough narrative to make them indelible and intoxicating, relatable but ultimately unknowable. It's a hell of a trick, and no accident. Wang is confident, subtle, and remarkably consistent, toying with expectations, cleanly sidestepping cliches, all that good stuff.

    If I have a criticism, it's that I wish this book were longer. I couldn't put it down, and I probably read it faster than I should have. Before I knew it the end was upon me, and I was bummed, left yearning and bereft.

    gets my highest recommendation for short fiction; run don't walk, do the right thing, yadda yadda.

  • Rhiannon Johnson

    Read my review on my blog:

    **I was given an advanced copy of this book from the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review**

    Let me cut to the chase...I've added Wang to my "auto-buy" authors list. If this is her debut, I can only imagine what else is to come...and I'm excited for it! Her ability to create layers of depth in each short story and characters who are complex, ambitious, and achingly unsure of themselves had me tearing through thi

    Read my review on my blog:

    **I was given an advanced copy of this book from the publisher and Netgalley in exchange for an honest review**

    Let me cut to the chase...I've added Wang to my "auto-buy" authors list. If this is her debut, I can only imagine what else is to come...and I'm excited for it! Her ability to create layers of depth in each short story and characters who are complex, ambitious, and achingly unsure of themselves had me tearing through this entire collection in a single morning.

  • Audra (ouija.doodle.reads)

    A stunning debut short story collection that is about so much more than just the young Chinese voices it captures. Wang’s voice is strong and distinct, different in every story, which is quite a feat of its own. I felt each of the characters inhabiting the pages, almost as if they could have held their own novel instead of just fifteen to twenty pages. I can’t wait to see what is next from this writer.

    There are three parts to the book, “Family,” “Love,” and “Time and Space,” and I had a favorit

    A stunning debut short story collection that is about so much more than just the young Chinese voices it captures. Wang’s voice is strong and distinct, different in every story, which is quite a feat of its own. I felt each of the characters inhabiting the pages, almost as if they could have held their own novel instead of just fifteen to twenty pages. I can’t wait to see what is next from this writer.

    There are three parts to the book, “Family,” “Love,” and “Time and Space,” and I had a favorite story from each section.

    “Mott Street in July” is about a family of Chinese Americans, specifically the experience of the kids growing up as the first of their family in America—the sacrifices, pains, mistakes, and opportunities. But more broadly, it is an exquisite story about the divide, clash, coming together, and remaking of culture into something new.

    “Fuerdai to the Max” is about the second generation rich, narrated by a kid you can’t help but to like, despite his extreme over privilege and lax ideas about consequences and the way things should work.

    “Echo of the Moment” was my favorite of the collection, about a girl visiting Paris alone who finds herself in possession of a dead girl’s wardrobe. The clothes turn her into a celebrity, but it’s like a strange ghost story—she’s someone else, inhabiting someone else’s life.

    This is a collection that short story readers will delight in.

    My thanks to Hogarth/Crown Publishing for sending me this one to read and review.

  • jo

    This collection of short stories blowed me away. One doesn't expect such level of expertise and command of the genre from a first collection, but Wang is definitely a short story writer. She may go on to write novels as well, but this is a genre she owns.

    This is one of those cases in which the author's being a "millennial" is incidental. The themes are universal. The writing is fantastic. Amazing.

  • Blair

    A strong debut collection of short stories.

    as being specifically about the Chinese millennial experience, but in fact it's rather broader than that; there's nothing about 'unconventional sex lives' or 'fantastic technologies' in here either. (That blurb is weird.) The 12 stories are sorted into three sections: 'Family', 'Love', and 'Time and Space'. One of the most exciting things about this collection is its variety of voices and tones, the sense that each new story represents a complet

    A strong debut collection of short stories.

    as being specifically about the Chinese millennial experience, but in fact it's rather broader than that; there's nothing about 'unconventional sex lives' or 'fantastic technologies' in here either. (That blurb is weird.) The 12 stories are sorted into three sections: 'Family', 'Love', and 'Time and Space'. One of the most exciting things about this collection is its variety of voices and tones, the sense that each new story represents a completely fresh perspective. At times, Xuan Juliana Wang's writing made me think of Jen George or Kristen Roupenian, but really,

    is its own thing.

    My favourites were:

    Largely plotless account of a group of

    'the twenty-somethings who drift aimlessly to the northern capital, a phenomenal tumble of new faces to Beijing.' They fall in love, break up, make music, watch porn, go drinking. The story is packed with details that feel authentic, tender and/or funny.

    The narrator and his friend Kenny are

    – second-generation rich. They've been studying in California, but have now returned to Beijing under something of a cloud. What did they do? These overprivileged kids initially come off as oddly likeable, but the deceptively casual narrative is leading us to a horrible revelation.

    Presented as practical advice on dealing with emotional problems, this story progresses through a series of increasingly absurd scenarios. 'Bilingual Heartache', for example, is 'someone breaking your heart in a foreign language. It is like regular heartache but somehow it's painful in a creative, innovative way.' The advice for that one is to pray for a painful, unsightly cold sore, so 'you can instead wallow in self-pity'.

    Taoyu and Hai are champion synchronised divers. Taoyu is secretly in love with Hai, but he also feels Hai is inseparable from himself; they have been training together since childhood, eating and studying together, sharing a bed. The characters' movements and interactions are described with graceful lyricism, and there are some beautiful images here, particularly the final scene.

    As a favour to a colleague, Yang agrees to look after a Chinese actress who's visiting New York. Only she gets obsessed with his apartment and refuses to leave, protesting that it's

    popular with the fans who watch her livestream, and can't Yang just find somewhere else to live? This nightmarish premise made my skin crawl, and it's brought to life precisely and effectively as Yang's identity is slowly dismantled. Ultimately, he seems to grasp at the possibilities of his chameleonic existence in New York, but an open ending leaves the reader to imagine his fate.

    This one is, for me, the best in the book. Chinese-American Echo is living in Paris when an American acquaintance, Celine, offers her a cache of free designer clothes. When Echo presses for an explanation, the answer is macabre: the original owner – a Korean model named Mega Mun – killed herself a few days earlier. But Echo can't resist the lure of the luxurious outfits, which not only feel as though they were made for her, but also seem to have a mysterious, powerful, even supernatural effect on her life. This story is irresistibly compelling and so perfectly crafted. In fact, it's one of the best ghost stories I've read this year.

    Home Remedies

    |

    |

    |

  • Thomas

    A gorgeous collection of short stories that centers the Chinese millennial experience and spans topics like immigration, family, romance, and how where we come from affects how we relate to others. This is going to be a lop-sided review because I have to first focus on my favorite story from this collection, “Vaulting the Sea.” “Vaulting the Sea” made my poor gay heart break and heal and ache as I cheered for its queer protagonist Taoyu. This story focuses on Taoyu and his best friend Hai, a pai

    A gorgeous collection of short stories that centers the Chinese millennial experience and spans topics like immigration, family, romance, and how where we come from affects how we relate to others. This is going to be a lop-sided review because I have to first focus on my favorite story from this collection, “Vaulting the Sea.” “Vaulting the Sea” made my poor gay heart break and heal and ache as I cheered for its queer protagonist Taoyu. This story focuses on Taoyu and his best friend Hai, a pair of synchronized divers poised for success at the Beijing Olympics. With beautiful, subtle prose Wang writes about Taoyu’s coming of age of his own queer identity as well as his relationship with his mother. You can literally imagine me whisper-screaming “oh my gosh, Taoyu, I love you!” in an emotional frenzy as I flipped the pages of this oh-so-quiet-yet-compelling short story. I feel like “Vaulting the Sea” represents what Wang does best in the strongest stories in this collection: capturing real emotions and relationships affected by the complex intersection of our own social identities and the cultures we leave or still reside within.

    Other standouts include “

    to the Max,” about second-generation rich Chinese youth who face few consequences for their actions until they do, “Algorithmic Problem-Solving for Father-Daughter Relationships,” about a father who tries to calculate an equation to make sense of his daughter who grew up in a culture different from his own, and “Future Cat,” about a woman who experiments with time as she settles into a boring marriage while longing for a past romantic flame. Again, I loved when Wang wrote about real relationships and how parent abandonment, mismatch between Chinese culture and mainstream American culture, and other nuanced topics affected these relationships. She shows the emotional consequences of these cultural misunderstandings, as well as the love that remains between family and friends despite these differences.

    This collection as a whole feels current and well-poised to make an impact in our changing society, while still relevant to long-drawn themes of family and connection and wanting to belong. While others in the collection did not resonate as much with me – the stories that felt more experimental and the ones that did not have a strong grounding within one or two characters’ emotional experiences – I still appreciated the variety of perspectives in

    . Recommended to those who want a fresh, contemporary collection of short stories with a diversity of literary elements and points of view.

  • Betsy Robinson

    What a remarkable, imaginative collection of stories. There is nothing here that I've seen before. The garden of Chinese characters is exotic to me simply because I've known nothing about them. The writing is elegant, sophisticated, and sometimes mature beyond what I would expect from somebody who looks as young as Wang does in her photo. Stories range from self-entitled rich kids who I didn't know existed in Communist China to old souls who understand growing old and loss and change.

    Kudos to th

    What a remarkable, imaginative collection of stories. There is nothing here that I've seen before. The garden of Chinese characters is exotic to me simply because I've known nothing about them. The writing is elegant, sophisticated, and sometimes mature beyond what I would expect from somebody who looks as young as Wang does in her photo. Stories range from self-entitled rich kids who I didn't know existed in Communist China to old souls who understand growing old and loss and change.

    Kudos to the cover designer who understands how to represent the indescribable imagination of this writing: cherries popping out of lush Asian hair flying up from a young forehead with pretty eye brows.

  • Bkwmlee

    I’m usually not a huge fan of short story collections, mainly because I don’t like the “incomplete” nature of short stories and the feeling I always get that I’m being left hanging. One of the things I detest most when I’m reading is to get deep into a story and its characters, only to have it end abruptly, with no logical conclusion to speak of – the ones that annoy me the most are those that feel like the author stopped in the middle of a thought and the writing all of a sudden drops off (thes

    I’m usually not a huge fan of short story collections, mainly because I don’t like the “incomplete” nature of short stories and the feeling I always get that I’m being left hanging. One of the things I detest most when I’m reading is to get deep into a story and its characters, only to have it end abruptly, with no logical conclusion to speak of – the ones that annoy me the most are those that feel like the author stopped in the middle of a thought and the writing all of a sudden drops off (these are also the ones that always make me think I am missing pages somewhere and perhaps I got a defective copy of the book). I guess you can say that I like my stories with a beginning, a middle section, and an ending, with characters that I can watch grow and develop over time and maybe even become invested in, which is hard to do with short stories where the reader is often only offered a snippet of a character’s story – what’s worse is that we are usually thrown in somewhere in the middle of the story, which means that it will likely take more effort to read and understand the nuances and significance behind each story.

    Given the above, I was really surprised that I enjoyed Xuan Juliana Wang’s debut short story collection

    as much as I did. This collection is billed as centering on the Chinese millennial experience and while I’m not a millennial, I found that I was still able to relate to some aspect of each story. Separated into 3 sections entitled “Family,” “Love,” and “Time and Space,” the 12 stories in this collection covered universally relatable themes, yet still managed to hone in perfectly on the cultural aspects of what it means to be Chinese in today’s society. As a Chinese-American who has lived in the U.S. practically my entire life, I found the stories about the difficulties of Chinese immigrant youth having to straddle two worlds and never being fully accepted into either one especially relatable, as it reminded me of many of the same struggles I had encountered back in my youth. This collection actually covered a lot of ground and each story managed to be deeply nuanced, despite the brevity that is usually expected with short stories. I was surprised by the depth of the stories in this collection and the cultural as well as emotional resonance that they evoked in me – as I said earlier, it’s usually difficult for me to get into short stories, but I dove into this set full force and found myself completely immersed. With that said though, I also found it frustrating that the journey with each character was so brief, with each story dropping off at what I felt was a significant moment. I wanted each story to be more complete, wanted to know what would happen to these characters.

    One of the things that set this collection of short stories apart from others is the variety, as each story had a distinctive voice, not a single one the same, yet the feelings and emotions the stories explored were often commonly felt ones. I also loved the writing, which was at times lyrical, at times straightforward, depending on the story, but was always completely engaging. This is an exquisite collection, one that I absolutely recommend. If you’re the type who generally only reads a limited number of short story collections (for me, it’s due to a preference for the fully fleshed-out stories and characters that are often only found in novels), this is definitely one that needs to be included on your list. Personally, I can’t wait to see what Xuan Juliana Wang has in store for us next!

    Lastly, here are a few of my favorites from this collection:

    “Mott Street in July” – about the transformation a Chinese family undergoes after immigrating to the United States – the opportunities they gain but also the sacrifices they have to make. As an immigrant myself, this was the story I was able to relate to the most.

    “For Our Children and For Ourselves” – about a rich, successful business woman arranging a marriage for her special needs daughter and the implications of that decision for all involved. This one was the most heartbreaking story for me, not necessarily because of how the story evolved, but the feelings evoked from what was not said – feelings that felt so familiar to me.

    to the Max” – about second generation Chinese rich kids who are used to not being held accountable for their actions and what happens when that day of reckoning finally arrives. This was an interesting one and I loved the angle the author took in relaying the events as they unfolded.

    “Home Remedies for Non-Life-Threatening Ailments” – presented as anecdotal advice for various ailments such as ‘boredom,’ ‘self-doubt,’ ‘bilingual heartache,’ ‘family pressure,’ etc., this one was both whimsical and original, which I absolutely loved!

    “Vaulting the Sea” – a coming-of-age story about two synchronized divers on the verge of finding success at the Olympics. This was a beautifully rendered story that I felt was the most real in the way it dealt with the characters’ emotions and relationships.

    “Algorithmic Problem Solving for Father-Daughter Relationships” – about a father who uses equations and algorithms to explain his relationship with his daughter, this was a fun one that depicts what happens when cultures clash within a family.

    “The Strawberry Years” – about a young man named Yang who is tasked with looking after a famous actress, only to have her refuse to leave and end up overtaking his life. This one captured the ubiquitous influence of social media perfectly, which I found absolutely fascinating.

    “Echo of the Moment” – about a Chinese-American girl living in Paris who finds herself in possession of an entire wardrobe of designer clothes belonging to a young model who had committed suicide a few days earlier. The supernatural slant to this story made for some compelling reading!

  • Megan Tristao

    Called a “radiant new talent” by Lauren Groff, Xuan Juliana Wang has written a debut collection about Chinese millennials. Weike Wang says these stories “surprise and challenge in wonderful, wonderful ways.” - Electric Lit

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.