Mount Dragon

Mount Dragon

Mount Dragon: an enigmatic research complex hidden in the vast desert of New Mexico. Guy Carson and Susana Cabeza de Vaca have come to Mount Dragon to work shoulder to shoulder with some of the greatest scientific minds on the planet. Led by visionary genius Brent Scopes, their secret goal is a medical breakthrough that promises to bring incalculable benefits to the human race. B...

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Title:Mount Dragon
Author:Douglas Preston
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Edition Language:English

Mount Dragon Reviews

  • Loraine Alcorn

    I do not know why I never read Mount Dragon before now but I think its one of my favorite books from Preston and Child .I know I have a lot of favorites but this one really entertained me and I was talking about it to everyone I know . If you're like me and am interested in biotechnology than this is the book for you -I had heard this compared to outbreak but its nothing like that and way better . This book was a joy to read and I would recommend it to anyone who is fascinated by biology , biote

    I do not know why I never read Mount Dragon before now but I think its one of my favorite books from Preston and Child .I know I have a lot of favorites but this one really entertained me and I was talking about it to everyone I know . If you're like me and am interested in biotechnology than this is the book for you -I had heard this compared to outbreak but its nothing like that and way better . This book was a joy to read and I would recommend it to anyone who is fascinated by biology , biotechnology , and bioengineering .

    Whats not to like about a bunch of scientists isolated in the desert trying to manufacture a cure for the flu by introducing a new gene into the human body . what could possibly go wrong :) - lets just say lots :)

  • Anthony

    Great story - fun read. I especially love the last part, in the desert, travelling by horse... I don't want to give spoilers, but all I can say is that their experience truly seems like torture.

  • Frank

    Another good thriller from Preston/Child. I always enjoy their books and this one is no exception. This is a combination sci-fi/thriller/western. It includes elements of all of these genres including the main story of the development of a way to change the human genome to eliminate the possibility of getting the flu. Well, this is all good, right? But along the way a nasty mutant flu virus is manufactured that could wipe out mankind (shades of

    by Stephen King). This virus came about through

    Another good thriller from Preston/Child. I always enjoy their books and this one is no exception. This is a combination sci-fi/thriller/western. It includes elements of all of these genres including the main story of the development of a way to change the human genome to eliminate the possibility of getting the flu. Well, this is all good, right? But along the way a nasty mutant flu virus is manufactured that could wipe out mankind (shades of

    by Stephen King). This virus came about through a corporation, GeneDyne that also developed an artificial blood called

    (shades of

    ?). Thrown in with this is a chase across the New Mexican desert and a possible lost treasure. Overall, I would recommend this one.

  • Heather Thurmeier

    As entertaining and exciting as all Preston Child books! Great characters, fun plot and always interesting to read. I would recommend it

  • Rebecca (agirlirlblog, bekkilyn)

    Many of us have dreamed about the CEO of a huge company personally taking interest in us and suddenly removing us from our lowly and often-demeaning jobs within the company and then giving us the ultimate opportunity to give middle management oppressors the virtual finger, so to speak. Well this very thing happened to Carson, a genetic scientist with a Ph.D. who had been working at insignificant tasks as a lower rung lab assistant with no hope of promotion under an extremely petty and insignific

    Many of us have dreamed about the CEO of a huge company personally taking interest in us and suddenly removing us from our lowly and often-demeaning jobs within the company and then giving us the ultimate opportunity to give middle management oppressors the virtual finger, so to speak. Well this very thing happened to Carson, a genetic scientist with a Ph.D. who had been working at insignificant tasks as a lower rung lab assistant with no hope of promotion under an extremely petty and insignificant boss.

    Well now Guy Carson was on his way to bigger and better things at a highly research lab called Mount Dragon where scientists are presumably working on genetic cures for highly virulent and contagious viruses. The security is top-notch and nothing could ever go wrong and release biological doomsday onto an unsuspecting world population.

    Or could it?

    I loved the concept of this book even before starting to read it and ended up liking the characters and the story a lot too. I only wish the characters had been a bit more developed because there were aspects of their personalities that I felt would have been strengthened with more expansion, and that would have made certain plot events even more meaningful. Still, this book was one of the author's earlier releases and it seems that they have been improving in this area. I also appreciated that the book is a standalone effort. (Though I've been told that a character from this book makes a minor appearance in a later Pendergast book.)

  • Mike (the Paladin)

    I like most of the Pendergast novels by Preston and Child... this isn't one.

    It's a competent effort and readable about the risks of genetic experiments and what we may do to ourselves. I didn't find it particularly memorable...but as I said, not a bad read.

    The scene that sticks particularly in my mind

  • Glen

    A research scientist is sent to a remote research facility to finish the project of a scientist that went insane and killed himself.

    The facility is a den of secrets, but the CEO is watching them almost every second via computers and cameras. The pressure is enormous, and the projects keep failing. Then more and more people go insane.

    Not bad, but perhaps not one of the authors' best works.

  • Rebecca

    Yikes. And that second star is because I'm trying HARD to give it the benefit of the doubt. I understand that this book addressed issues that are evolving at a mind-boggling rate, and this book is two decades old. That being said, even if you look past the alarmist rhetoric and downright wonky notions of technology, it was still lumbering, unfocused, and at times downright goofy. Oh, and don't forget about the blatant misogyny. In this world, women in science and technology are either beautiful

    Yikes. And that second star is because I'm trying HARD to give it the benefit of the doubt. I understand that this book addressed issues that are evolving at a mind-boggling rate, and this book is two decades old. That being said, even if you look past the alarmist rhetoric and downright wonky notions of technology, it was still lumbering, unfocused, and at times downright goofy. Oh, and don't forget about the blatant misogyny. In this world, women in science and technology are either beautiful but bitchy assistants who eventually get sexed out of their bad moods by a bland cowboy hero, or overweight and aggressive cold fishes who, when the chips are down, just can't hold their shit together. I wish I'd have skipped this one.

  • Lobstergirl

    One of the distinct pleasures of reading mass market thrillers of the 1990s is the studied hyperventilating of the passages about computers and digital technology. Authors can't seem to

    document every prosaic "keystroke" "typed" by a character.

    "He typed a few brief commands...and waited while the files were copied to the laptop's hard disk. Then he loaded Burt's notes into the laptop's word processor."

    "He initiated the upload with a few keystrokes, and an access light on

    One of the distinct pleasures of reading mass market thrillers of the 1990s is the studied hyperventilating of the passages about computers and digital technology. Authors can't seem to

    document every prosaic "keystroke" "typed" by a character.

    "He typed a few brief commands...and waited while the files were copied to the laptop's hard disk. Then he loaded Burt's notes into the laptop's word processor."

    "He initiated the upload with a few keystrokes, and an access light on the terminal's faceplate lit up."

    Isn't that delightful? It's like coming across a novel where everyone wears a fanny pack.

    Another theme indicating this is a novel not quite of our current time is the relentless fat-shaming of a 250 lb. female scientist (everyone is working on deadly viruses in a remote, isolated desert locale, lots of airlocks, decontamination chambers, biosuits). The company boss and all her colleagues constantly chuckle ruefully about how large and unattractive she is. The book's hero calls her a "walking chuck wagon."

    In spite of this, the plot is interesting until the two-thirds mark, when the hero and his hot nonfat assistant are forced to set off into the desert on horseback with limited water, pursued by a killer. This alternates with the tedious detailing of the evil company CEO's creation of a virtual reality universe (he calls it "cypherspace") which his nemesis is trying to penetrate.

    Almost done here with my keystrokes....loading this into GR' word processor, about to click "save" and watch as the next page loads.

  • Ariel

    I was really excited for the premise of this one, since I've loved other books by these authors, and I am such a sucker for pandemic stories.

    But the main character was such a massive twat!!

    He called a woman a bitch after knowing her for two minutes because she was adamant about enforcing level 5 biohazard protocols, he and other characters continuously called the only fat character in the book "a walking chunk" and "a mountain of adipose", and immediately went on a rambling and offensive

    I was really excited for the premise of this one, since I've loved other books by these authors, and I am such a sucker for pandemic stories.

    But the main character was such a massive twat!!

    He called a woman a bitch after knowing her for two minutes because she was adamant about enforcing level 5 biohazard protocols, he and other characters continuously called the only fat character in the book "a walking chunk" and "a mountain of adipose", and immediately went on a rambling and offensive rant about how "he used to have MExican friends when he was little" and "where are you REALLY from?" and "Mexicans are so hard working!" during his very first conversation with the Latina love interest.

    And I DNFed it at 15%.

    Massively disappointing.

    It only gets to keep it's second star because it was engaging, and if the MC wasn't such a massive butthole, I would have kept going.

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