Going Off Script

Going Off Script

A TV writer's room intern must join forces with her crush to keep her boss from ruining a lesbian character in this diverse contemporary YA romance from the author of Queens of Geek.Seventeen-year-old Bex is thrilled when she gets an internship on her favorite tv show, Silver Falls. Unfortunately, the internship isn't quite what she expected... instead of sitting in a crow...

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Title:Going Off Script
Author:Jen Wilde
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Going Off Script Reviews

  • kav (xreadingsolacex)

    by Jen Wilde is a young-adult contemporary novel that follows the story of Bex Phillips, a lesbian 18-year-old who travels down to LA after she is given an internship on her favorite TV show,

    , where she hopes to catch a glimpse of her dream world where wants to be a writer. Along the way, she happens to meet a fellow lesbian in the industry, Shrupty Padwal, and

    by Jen Wilde is a young-adult contemporary novel that follows the story of Bex Phillips, a lesbian 18-year-old who travels down to LA after she is given an internship on her favorite TV show,

    , where she hopes to catch a glimpse of her dream world where wants to be a writer. Along the way, she happens to meet a fellow lesbian in the industry, Shrupty Padwal, and sparks just happen to fly. Unfortunately, though Bex is exploring first love and in the land of dreams, she has to learn to navigate the politics of this industry and deal with straight-washing from cis straight white men in power.

    Y'all...I don't even where to begin with this novel. It means everything and more to me. (If you're over 21, take a shot every time I say that in a review.)

    Regardless, it is true.

    Jen Wilde is one of my favorite authors of all-time, and she continues to wow me with every novel she releases, and

    is no exception.

    First of all, this novel is just a damn good novel. It is well-written, intriguing, and a very quick read (in the best way possible).

    Wilde has this tendency of including these very media-centric themes in her work, and I just

    that. First, she explores YouTube and movies with

    , then, music and bands with

    , and now, television and YouTube once more with

    .

    These plotlines just interest me so much - maybe because of my interest in media and entertainment (hi i have a youtube channel lol) - but I just think that they're so fitting with the world we live in today and they're such unique explorations that I rarely get to read about in the majority of the books I read.

    I also really love Wilde's habit of allowing her previous characters to make cameos in her books, though a few characters make a bit more than a cameo in this one - Charlie and Alyssa from QOG and Will and Ryan (and Emmy and Chloe) from TB. Whereas these books aren't connected plot-wise and they can be read on their own, for those of us who do reads all of them, it's just a nice addition that enhances the reading experience. (Also, I highly recommend that you

    read all of them.)

    But now...as we all know is a necessity in my reviews, let's get into the ~ deep ~ stuff.

    features a lesbian main character who falls for an Indian lesbian character, and the two fight against homophobes and people in power which is just...so meaningful y'all.

    There are so many things this novel got

    , and that just made my lil' queer brown heart so happy.

    First, I want to talk about Shrupty Padwal, the love interest. Shrupty is a badass Indian lesbian YouTuber who makes beauty-related videos until she finds her talent for acting after meeting Bex, and she decides to explore that for a bit.

    I legitimately cannot tell you if I want to be Shrupty or if I want to date Shrupty, but I can tell you that I love her with my whole entire heart. I don't know if there are words to fully express how I feel about her character, but let's just say...it means a whole fucking lot.

    Then, there's Bex, our leading woman*.

    *

    (relatable content Bex)

    Bex is a character who really comes into her own over the course of this novel. She goes from a closeted lil' queer girl to an out-and-proud badass (not that being closeted makes you less badass, but being out-and-proud gave Bex the confidence to be herself) who fights back against bigots with too much power.

    I really loved seeing the progression of her bond with her cousin, Parker, as the two are literal icons, and I loved seeing her relationship with her best friend, Gabby, and her bond with her mom. I loved how all these important and vital relationships weren't kicked to the back burner in the process of exploring her relationship with Shrupty, rather, all of the relationships - familial, platonic, and romantic - flourished throughout the course of the novel.

    But...I also

    love the relationship between Bex and Shrupty.

    I would die,,,for my two lesbian moms,,,whose chemistry makes the queer world go-round.

    No, but, seriously, the relationship is just

    , but it truly is something you have explore for yourself by reading this novel.

    I also want to give a shout-out to a few other parts of this novel:

    First of all, the use of the word lesbian.

    Oftentimes, I feel like the word 'lesbian' is avoided in exchange of 'gay' or 'queer' - and for some people, those other labels are right and that's valid - but so is lesbian as a label. And it is often not used because idk sexism and fetishization and whatnot, so to see it on the page just...meant so much to me. To know that these two characters

    lesbians, that it isn't something that's not explicitly stated on the page, just makes me very, very happy.

    I also want to acknowledge the seamless inclusion of using meds.

    Whereas this isn't fully delved into throughout the novel, Bex's reasons for using Ritalin are discussed, her dealings with anxiety are mentioned, and the meds are brought up casually throughout the novel, which is just so important in fighting to destigmatize medication.

    And finally, I want to discuss one last aspect of this novel - Bex coming from a poor family and feeling ashamed. This truly was an exquisitely explored arc of the novel, and it was handled in the most beautiful manner possible.

    This novel is just beautiful in every which way, and I am thankful and so grateful to have it in life. I highly, highly recommend you pick it up.

  • julianna ➹

    I don't think I've ever smiled this much in my life. everyone say thank you jen wilde

  • Danika at The Lesbrary

    Just what I've come to expect from Jen Wilde: fluffy, queer, and totally enthralling. I read this almost entirely in a day, and I finished it frantically reading while walking home from the bus stop, unable to put it down. It also has some overlapping side characters from Queens of Geek and The Brightsiders. There are so many geeky references, and so much love for fandom--especially queer fandom. There's also anxiety rep from the main character and talk of growing up poor. Two of the side charac

    Just what I've come to expect from Jen Wilde: fluffy, queer, and totally enthralling. I read this almost entirely in a day, and I finished it frantically reading while walking home from the bus stop, unable to put it down. It also has some overlapping side characters from Queens of Geek and The Brightsiders. There are so many geeky references, and so much love for fandom--especially queer fandom. There's also anxiety rep from the main character and talk of growing up poor. Two of the side characters (including the love interest) are queer women of colour (Alyssa is Black and Shrupty is Indian-American). Is the villain a bit mustache-twirling? Sure. Is the happy ending a little more cotton candy than is realistic? Probably. But that's the point! This is an amazing, escapist, revenge-against-the-heteropatriarchy-media read. It's the perfect book for when you want a queer read that's fun, fast-paced, and heartwarming.

  • Natasha

    This was a great read. I loved the main character, a relatable Useless Lesbian™. I loved her romance and her relationship with her cousin. This is partly a coming out story, not the full story.

    The whole straight-washing part is actually something that showed up much later so I'm confused why it was in the summary. I do like how it went though.

    I will say one gripe I had was that the antagonist sort of character was a little too cartoonish but not the worst thing in the world.

    Super cute and fun

    This was a great read. I loved the main character, a relatable Useless Lesbian™. I loved her romance and her relationship with her cousin. This is partly a coming out story, not the full story.

    The whole straight-washing part is actually something that showed up much later so I'm confused why it was in the summary. I do like how it went though.

    I will say one gripe I had was that the antagonist sort of character was a little too cartoonish but not the worst thing in the world.

    Super cute and fun. Really enjoyed it.

  • Lea (drumsofautumn)

    3.5 stars. Jen Wilde is slowly but surely becoming my favourite Contemporary author. I can count on her books to be

    And Going Off Script is no exception.

    While I know that many will find the novel too fast moving, I have kinda come to expect

    3.5 stars. Jen Wilde is slowly but surely becoming my favourite Contemporary author. I can count on her books to be

    And Going Off Script is no exception.

    While I know that many will find the novel too fast moving, I have kinda come to expect that from Wilde's novels and so it was not an issue for me at all. Time just works different in Jen Wilde's novels and

    But if you can overlook that flaw, this novel gets a lot more enjoyable.

    We have a super

    The main character, Bex, is gay, grew up poor and her family still struggles financially. She mentions that she is questioning her gender identity briefly and she also takes different meds and while I think it's never specified, based on those I think she has ADHD. Her love interest, Shrupty, is Indian and gay. There are several other queer side-characters and characters of colour!

    Bex's struggles to come out even though she is so sure of her sexuality and has people around her that would absolutely support her were so realistic and relatable and something I haven't read like that before. Coming out always feels scary, even when you are in a safe environment!

    All the characters are absolutely wonderful and lovable and have great relationships between them.

    , from Jane, one of the writers of Silver Falls, who is the one who really takes care of her and basically her confidant, to her cousin Parker, who she lives with while in LA and really reminds her of her roots.

    The romance between Bex and Shrupty was probably my favourite part and also probably my

    They are always really swoonworthy but this one was particularly beautifully written. The chemistry between Shrupty and Bex and how much positive energy they both had was so wonderful to see. Even though, as mentioned before, they fall for each other quite fast, I believed every second of it. Their physical chemistry is absolutely fantastic too and they had some pretty amazing make-out scenes.

    One of my issues was that the

    , which is one of my biggest pet peeves in books. I didn't know at all what the main conflict was going be because I hadn't read the synopsis (I was sold as soon as I knew this book was Jen Wilde and queer) but when Bex did the most stupid thing I could imagine, I immediately knew where the story was gonna go.

    Now I think that while I didn't like the cause for the drama, I thought that the conflict itself was handled well. It caused a whole uproar of things and opened a very important discussion of being a marginalized person in Hollywood.

    In general this book had so many important messages packed into it. It talked about

    in today's times. It showed that there's people who act like they're allys but are not at all behind the scenes or don't understand what it actually means to be an ally.

    Sometimes those messages were very in your face but I personally don't mind that at all. And as a self-proclaimed SJW, I would've handled a lot of the things in a very similar way, so if some things might seem exagarrated to certain readers, it is a life that a lot of people live.

    Another thing I loved was Bex really appreciating where she came from and how much her mother has done for her to be where she is at now. Bex looks at LA like the perfect city, where dreams come true and everyone is accepted but the quickly realizes that that is not how things work.

    She tries to hide her upbringing but talking to Parker, who she shared a room with growing up and who is super proud of his roots, and seeing LA as it really is, makes her understand that it is so important to

    that part from people. If they don't accept you and where you come from, they're not your people!

    Overall I really enjoyed this book. It is probably my least favourite Jen Wilde but that means nothing considering how much I loved both Queens of Geek and The Brightsiders. And it was so fun to see some of the characters from her two previous books show up in this one. Jen Wilde has created this amazing universe of famous queer people and I really hope she continues to write stories set in this universe.

    for fans of Jen Wilde's other novels, GEEKERELLA/THE PRINCESS AND THE FANGIRL by Ashley Poston and EVERYTHING LEADS TO YOU by Nina LaCour and generally everyone that loves queer Contemporaries with a good portion of social justice warriors!

  • Clara

    This book was SUPER CUTE and yet SO IMPORTANT. It deals with so many important subjects and I’ll try to list them all on here later on! I’m keep my .5 because my baby Alfie wasn’t mentioned, but JEN WILDE YOU HAVE MY HEART FOREVER.

  • Lola

    June is Pride Month—not that you need me to remind you—so I’m reading almost exclusively books with LGBTQIA+ characters in order to show my support, thus highlighting LGBTQIA+ themed stories. And this is a beautiful, under-the-radar gem you should definitely check out if you, too, want to join the Pride wagon but aren’t sure what would make a great summer read.

    Remember the lovely and mildly popular LGBTQIA+ book titled QUEENS OF GEEK? The one with the con, strong friendships and swoon-worthy rel

    June is Pride Month—not that you need me to remind you—so I’m reading almost exclusively books with LGBTQIA+ characters in order to show my support, thus highlighting LGBTQIA+ themed stories. And this is a beautiful, under-the-radar gem you should definitely check out if you, too, want to join the Pride wagon but aren’t sure what would make a great summer read.

    Remember the lovely and mildly popular LGBTQIA+ book titled QUEENS OF GEEK? The one with the con, strong friendships and swoon-worthy relationships? Yes, that one. This book was written by the same author so I have no idea why it’s so under-the-radar. After all, Jen Wilde’s writing is elegant and her characters so easy to relate to.

    You don’t even have to be into writing, filming, directing or a huge fangirl/boy to enjoy this story. It’s universal in that way. Bex gets an internship, proves herself at her internship by writing a script which is then stolen. Betrayal and hopes squashed are things most of us can understand and connect with. And if you’re like me, then your instinct tells you find a solution and fight until everything is right again. That’s what Bex learns to do, and thankfully she has people who care about her to back her up.

    The storyline is pretty simple but I enjoyed the themes of perseverance, love (wonderful lesbian romance and family bonds!), courage as well as the dirty information provided about the dirty Hollywood film industry that everyone loves to hate. The main ‘‘villain’’ is pretty one-dimensional, despicable and stereotypical but I couldn’t wait to see him suffer.

    It’s Pride Month, Pride Month, Pride Month. So read it, read it, read iiiit.

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  • Fadwa (Word Wonders)

    I received a copy from the publisher for the blog tour, this is no way affects my opinion

    Original review posted on my blog :

    I have such an amazing history with Jen Wilde’s books. Queens of Geek was one of my favourite reads of 2017 (was it 2017? I think so.) and I read The Brightsiders earlier this year which also was a book I adored. And although I did have a couple qualms with Going off-script, I enjoyed it

    I received a copy from the publisher for the blog tour, this is no way affects my opinion

    Original review posted on my blog :

    I have such an amazing history with Jen Wilde’s books. Queens of Geek was one of my favourite reads of 2017 (was it 2017? I think so.) and I read The Brightsiders earlier this year which also was a book I adored. And although I did have a couple qualms with Going off-script, I enjoyed it a lot and it just cemented the idea that this author writes just my kinds of stories. Stories that deal with important issues but still manage to be cute and light and fun and give me all the warm fuzzy feelings.

    The writing is the first (and only) part I couldn’t connect with and I’m not sure what it’s due to because as I’ve previously stated, I thoroughly enjoy Jen Wilde’s books and part of that is the writing. But here it felt a bit cliché with a couple scenes and sentences that have been done time and time again, and although I usually don’t mind them but in this case, there were quite a few of them. This might also be, and probably is, a case of “it’s me not you” since it’s not a complaint I’ve seen anyone else make so far.

    The thing I love most about Jen Wilde’s books is how wonderfully queer they are, and this one is no exception. Going off Script is basically queer culture bundled up in a book, everything from its characters and setting to the references screamed unapologetically queer and I lived for it. I also love how the author sets her books in the same universe and since all of them happen in the entertainment industry, all her characters meet and the books kind of bleed into each other to make one giant story, but the great part is that you don’t need to read one to read the others, they’re fully fleshed out stories all on their own. We got to see Alyssa and Charlie from Queens of Geeks as well as Will and Ryan from The Brightsiders and we also met new characters.

    Most important of all is Bex, our lesbian main character. She’s anxious and (maybe?) has ADHD and moves to LA to follow her dreams of becoming a screenwriter at the beginning of the book. She’s shy, awkward and a bit of a pushover but as the novel progresses, she grows into herself and grows comfortable with herself, who she is, who she wants to be and where she comes from which is something she struggles with for a while. I loved seeing her “bloom” and grow into this still anxious but a lot more confident and badass person who wants to make the film industry a lot more inclusive and less shady and white straight male dominated.

    There’s also a mention of her questioning her gender and I loved how casually that was put into the story and how she was comfortable with the questioning label and was in no rush to figure it out. As that’s not something we see a lot in fiction but that happens quite a lot in real life. And as an anxious person myself, I loved seeing her kind of navigate life in a very unfamiliar setting, find her footing, have doubts, consider qutting and keep pushing through.

    Then we have Shrupty, her lesbian Indian love interest who’s a youtuber trying to pave her way as an actor and she was such a fun character to get to know. She was confident but also dorky, sweet and thoughtful. And I lowkey screamed at the fact that their relationship is one of my favourite tropes: Awkward shy queer meets confident bubbly queer, the latter flirting and teasing while the first is absolutely flustered and losing their wits. A+ content, and very entertaining. They had me giggling well into the night.

    There were so many other characters I absolutely adored. The whole friends group was amazing, like I said, they’re all queer and make up this little family that filled my heart with so much joy but special mention to Parker who’s Bex’s cousin and basically her brother. They grew up together under the same roof and shared everything. He was there for her to support her in her decisions but also call her out and pt her in her place when she needed it most. so I liked how it’s not a sibling relationship in the most literal sense of the term but still had all the dynamics that make it one, if it makes sense.

    All in all, this book was such a good balance of cute and important, with characters who shared heartfelt moments while dismantling a flawed system and taking down a showrunner who cared about nothing and no one but himself and went to extreme lengths to oppress the people working under him. Like steal scripts. And queerbait. And threaten. And lie. And bribe. And… you get it. And I loved seeing him get his ass handed to him.

  • ⚔ Silvia ⚓

    If you I've ever needed a book as badly as I need this, think again

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)

    21 May 2019

    okay, okay, I'm going to need y'all to read this blurb. It is about a teen writer. Her boss rewrites her lesbian character as straight. And then she and the actress launch a #DontHideYourGays campaign against the studio and fall in love along the way. GOD BLESS. This book will be about

    and dating in the public eye and all that good shit. 

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