The Pretty One: On Life, Pop Culture, Disability, and Other Reasons to Fall in Love With Me

The Pretty One: On Life, Pop Culture, Disability, and Other Reasons to Fall in Love With Me

From the disability rights advocate and creator of the #DisabledAndCute viral campaign, a thoughtful, inspiring, and charming collection of essays exploring what it means to be black and disabled in a mostly able-bodied white America. Keah Brown loves herself, but that hadn’t always been the case. Born with cerebral palsy, her greatest desire used to be normalcy and refuge...

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Title:The Pretty One: On Life, Pop Culture, Disability, and Other Reasons to Fall in Love With Me
Author:Keah Brown
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Edition Language:English

The Pretty One: On Life, Pop Culture, Disability, and Other Reasons to Fall in Love With Me Reviews

  • Katie Tamola

    I can’t say enough good things about this memoir and about Keah Brown. I was so excited to read this and she did not disappoint. Heartfelt and funny, this is one of those books that feels like a best friend. I’m excited to be sharing this one with my friends!

  • Morgan Schulman

    I received an advanced readers copy in exchange for an honest review.

    This is exactly the book we need right now. Not only does it inform and challenge stigma against people with disabilities, it is a meaningful story of the author’s journey to see herself as cute AND disabled. In a world that does not always love us, we need to love ourselves. We need to celebrate our own beauty in order to have the strength to fight the world’s ugly

  • Kelly Hager

    I initially accepted the pitch for this because I am obsessed with all things pop culture and because this is a voice that I don't really hear that often. (I read books about and by Black authors, but I don't know off the top of my head how many books by disabled authors I've read. Which means I don't read enough of them. I would like recommendations.)

    I'm so glad I did. Keah Brown and I have a lot of pop culture in common and I got almost all of her references. I had that sort of giddy "ME TOO!"

    I initially accepted the pitch for this because I am obsessed with all things pop culture and because this is a voice that I don't really hear that often. (I read books about and by Black authors, but I don't know off the top of my head how many books by disabled authors I've read. Which means I don't read enough of them. I would like recommendations.)

    I'm so glad I did. Keah Brown and I have a lot of pop culture in common and I got almost all of her references. I had that sort of giddy "ME TOO!" reaction so many times in this book and it felt like I was making a new best friend.

    But that's not the real value here (although definitely come for the pop culture references, because they are perfection). Instead, it's in her candid discussions about how it feels to be disabled (her words) in a world that not only is clearly not meant for you but which seems to purposely ignore you (and best) and grind you down every chance it gets.  The act of loving yourself and being kind to yourself becomes an actual revolutionary act, one of the bravest things you can do. 

    I loved this book so much and I hope this is the start of a long writing career. Keah Brown is my new favorite. Highly recommended.

  • Jade

    I wrote a long, rambling review of my thoughts while reading The Pretty One by Keah Brown, and then I realized I was just paraphrasing content that the author had already eloquently stated in a much more poignant, honest, and firsthand way. So I’m keeping those rambling thoughts for myself as a reminder that I still have so much to learn from others, and using this space to tell everyone in the world that you really need to go out and pick this book up and read it for yourself.

    The Pretty One to

    I wrote a long, rambling review of my thoughts while reading The Pretty One by Keah Brown, and then I realized I was just paraphrasing content that the author had already eloquently stated in a much more poignant, honest, and firsthand way. So I’m keeping those rambling thoughts for myself as a reminder that I still have so much to learn from others, and using this space to tell everyone in the world that you really need to go out and pick this book up and read it for yourself.

    The Pretty One touched me and taught me so much. Keah Brown has one of the most refreshing and positive voices I have heard in a long time. Her words are equally honest, funny, poignant, and important. This collection of essays discusses representation at every intersection, and provides ample information on why disabilities are not only completely underrepresented in society at large but so often inaccurately represented. As an able-bodied white woman I took a lot of her words to heart, and realized how disabled people are continuously portrayed in a stereotypical manner in TV and movies, and more often than most by able-bodied actors. This collection discusses being disabled in an ableist society, from a personal and more general point of view, and how the author grew up hating her disability and her personal journey towards learning to love herself the way she is. Self-love, discrimination, under-representation, misrepresentation, tokenism, coming of age, activism, ableism, racism, feminism: Keah Brown’s essays touch on all of these topics and more, and they should be read and amplified. As a society we have to do so much better, and we must listen to those who are often erased or ignored is the first step.

    And seriously, Keah Brown has such a unique, positive, and happy voice, she writes wonderfully, and these essays were all a joy to read. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the advance copy, and thank to the author for writing such a wonderful, personal collection of essays. The Pretty One will be on my must read list for a long time.

  • Suzanna

    This was a great read! She writes honestly - and hilariously - about being a black woman with cerebral palsy. It was refreshing to have a different point of view, but also relatable in the things she shared that she has struggled with. She is a delightful writer, I hope she writes more!

  • Never Without a Book™

    Born with cerebral palsy and the creator of the viral hashtag #DisabledAndCute, Keah Brown is not one to let her disability slow her down. In her debut collection of essays, The Pretty One, Brown tells her story of what’s it like to be Black and disabled. This read was truly an experience outside of my own. I laughed, cried and couldn’t get enough of Brown’s positivity and determination. I am so happy this book exists. This is a must read!

    Thank you, Atria Books & Netgalley, for gifting me a

    Born with cerebral palsy and the creator of the viral hashtag #DisabledAndCute, Keah Brown is not one to let her disability slow her down. In her debut collection of essays, The Pretty One, Brown tells her story of what’s it like to be Black and disabled. This read was truly an experience outside of my own. I laughed, cried and couldn’t get enough of Brown’s positivity and determination. I am so happy this book exists. This is a must read!

    Thank you, Atria Books & Netgalley, for gifting me a copy in exchange for an honest review.

  • Roxane

    What does it mean to live at the intersections of blackness, womanhood, and disability? In her admirable debut, The Pretty One, Keah Brown answers this question with heart, charm, and humor. Across twelve finely crafted essays, Brown explores the matter of representation in popular culture, the vulnerability of facing self-loathing and learning to love herself, the challenge of repairing fractured relationships with family, the yearning for romantic love. Through her words we see that Brown is n

    What does it mean to live at the intersections of blackness, womanhood, and disability? In her admirable debut, The Pretty One, Keah Brown answers this question with heart, charm, and humor. Across twelve finely crafted essays, Brown explores the matter of representation in popular culture, the vulnerability of facing self-loathing and learning to love herself, the challenge of repairing fractured relationships with family, the yearning for romantic love. Through her words we see that Brown is not just the pretty one she is the magnificently human one.

  • jo

    In disability and race activism there is a very important place for rage. Keah Brown shows us that there is also a place for youth and playfulness. Brown is as clear-eyed about the nuances of many-fronted discrimination as any disability/race/gender intersectional activist. She is also aware of the injuries her life has inflicted on herself and her relationships. But she makes the political choice to tackle this pain and ugliness with cuteness. With her smile, her youth, her #disabledandcute has

    In disability and race activism there is a very important place for rage. Keah Brown shows us that there is also a place for youth and playfulness. Brown is as clear-eyed about the nuances of many-fronted discrimination as any disability/race/gender intersectional activist. She is also aware of the injuries her life has inflicted on herself and her relationships. But she makes the political choice to tackle this pain and ugliness with cuteness. With her smile, her youth, her #disabledandcute hashtag, she frames the discourses of disability, race and gender in terms that are both crystal clear and intensely palatable to 20- and 30-somethings and to pretty much everybody who wants to learn.

  • Kelly

    A really powerful and moving essay collection about being disabled, about being black and disabled and being invisible in and to the world around you, and about learning to fall in love with yourself. Keah's voice is really great and she's wildly vulnerable. She also invites you, as reader, to be vulnerable with her.

    Finding essay collections about disability -- and writing about it more broadly -- from the voice of a person of color is so rare. This book is a necessary one, as much as it's a tr

    A really powerful and moving essay collection about being disabled, about being black and disabled and being invisible in and to the world around you, and about learning to fall in love with yourself. Keah's voice is really great and she's wildly vulnerable. She also invites you, as reader, to be vulnerable with her.

    Finding essay collections about disability -- and writing about it more broadly -- from the voice of a person of color is so rare. This book is a necessary one, as much as it's a treat.

  • BookTrib.com

    There’s nothing wrong with being different, but that’s not how the world made Keah Brown feel. She spent her childhood believing she was the same as everyone else, but she has cerebral palsy.

    The Pretty One (Atria Books) by Keah Brown is a collection of essays not only about living but living with a disability. Brown acknowledges she is different, and though it took a long time, she knows she is beautiful because of it. This book is a journey of self-discovery that would inspire anyone.

    Brown’s wo

    There’s nothing wrong with being different, but that’s not how the world made Keah Brown feel. She spent her childhood believing she was the same as everyone else, but she has cerebral palsy.

    The Pretty One (Atria Books) by Keah Brown is a collection of essays not only about living but living with a disability. Brown acknowledges she is different, and though it took a long time, she knows she is beautiful because of it. This book is a journey of self-discovery that would inspire anyone.

    Brown’s words are heavy and brutal, as she chose to not hold back. She says she lost her ignorance and innocence when a boy pointed out how different she was because of her disability, making it easy to be bitter at the world. People are naturally apt to become jealous or angry at something out of their reach. She desperately wanted to be normal like her sister, but couldn’t just make her cerebral palsy go away.

    She eventually chose to embrace her illness and realize she had to make the best of it. She was not different because of her disability, she was different because no two people are the same. She did not let her disability define her but made it a part of who she was. Keah was happier because of it.

    With this inspirational message in mind, she continued to explain how she moves through life with her self-esteem levels fluctuating and how people perceive her affecting her every day. It’s hard to keep a positive mindset when people point things out about yourself that you already know. She reflects on times when she took her bitterness out on her own family and how this affected her relationships with the people she loved the most, even to this day. Her struggle has not been easy, but she is choosing to fix what has been lost and move forward in a more more positive light.

    The rest of the review:

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