The Marriage Clock

The Marriage Clock

Named a Must-Read Book of the Summer by POPSUGAR, Bustle, Book Riot, and more! In Zara Raheem's fresh, funny, smart debut, a young, Muslim-American woman is given three months to find the right husband or else her traditional Indian parents will find one for her--a novel with a universal story that everyone can relate to about the challenges of falling in love.To Leila Abi...

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Title:The Marriage Clock
Author:Zara Raheem
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Marriage Clock Reviews

  • Meli

    I expected this to be a typical romcom, but there was much more depth to the characters and story than I anticipated. The mother, her friends/cousin, and Leila are each flawed and complicated in their own ways and you can't help but cheer for them throughout. I read this in one sitting because I could not put it down. Raheem's book is a hilarious yet honest look at love, heartbreak and the pressures that come with cultural expectations. I recommend this to not only gain insight about Muslim-Indi

    I expected this to be a typical romcom, but there was much more depth to the characters and story than I anticipated. The mother, her friends/cousin, and Leila are each flawed and complicated in their own ways and you can't help but cheer for them throughout. I read this in one sitting because I could not put it down. Raheem's book is a hilarious yet honest look at love, heartbreak and the pressures that come with cultural expectations. I recommend this to not only gain insight about Muslim-Indian culture, but also if you just want to be thoroughly entertained.

  • Tillie

    Excellent book. Really opened my eyes to the Muslim culture. Leila's dilemma was presented in a very real fashion. Her thoughts and struggles were real and poignant. I applaud her decision in the end.

  • Felicia Grossman

    I LOVED this book. Like totally loved. Leila is funny and adorable and you only want good things for her (and men who don't ghost her say "BAM" too much or ask about her genetic history or gives her his honest age...). You really feel how she's torn between loving her culture and being frustrated by it (and her well-meaning, lovable, but at times frustrating parents). Her struggle for balance is so genuine.

    And every single character is so well-drawn, form Leila's group of friends, to her various

    I LOVED this book. Like totally loved. Leila is funny and adorable and you only want good things for her (and men who don't ghost her say "BAM" too much or ask about her genetic history or gives her his honest age...). You really feel how she's torn between loving her culture and being frustrated by it (and her well-meaning, lovable, but at times frustrating parents). Her struggle for balance is so genuine.

    And every single character is so well-drawn, form Leila's group of friends, to her various dates (and their parents, to her family in India, each is unique and special and you can totally hear everyone's voice.

    And the writing--beautiful. There were so many laugh-out-loud moments as well as poignant ones. Lelia's story is familiar and unique and where her journey will take her is up in the air through the entire piece, keeping you reading until the very end. I am so happy I got to read this as an ARC. I can't recommend this book enough!

  • Nalini Srivastava

    Loved the writing and the content is so relatable. I recommend everyone to read this book.

  • Julia Phillips

    So fresh and charming and fun! I adored being in Leila's world, from her girls' nights with her friends to her conversations with her loving, pressuring parents to her many first dates. What a joy to read.

  • Erica Boyce

    This is a lovely and hilarious book about family, love, and finding yourself as an adult within your culture's expectations. I devoured it in three days and was so sad to see it end! Raheem deftly draws a cast of very real characters that I felt for and grew to love very quickly. I laughed out loud at several moments! A really fun and thought-provoking read.

  • Rachel Strolle

    this book is a whole ass mood

  • Ray

    Hey

    check this out, THIS is how to have a very good rep and a good plot.

    I absolutely LOVED this book!

    It was really well written, the language was simple and straight to the point.

    The plot was interesting to say the least, there was always something going on and it had no down moment.

    I loved the rep in this book, both racial and religious.

    U

    Hey

    check this out, THIS is how to have a very good rep and a good plot.

    I absolutely LOVED this book!

    It was really well written, the language was simple and straight to the point.

    The plot was interesting to say the least, there was always something going on and it had no down moment.

    I loved the rep in this book, both racial and religious.

    Usually when I read books with muslim characters they're either perfect muslims who do nothing wrong at all, or completely disconnected from their religion.

    Leila felt more relatable because she was this person who loved her religion and her culture, but at the same time screwed up here and there and did things that are wrong then recovered from them.

    I absolutely loved that ending! It was what I was hoping would happen in the end but I wasn't sure it would.

    I kind of felt like I went through a self discovery journey throughout this book and I emerged more confident and sure.

    The one thing I must point out though, is the fact that there was no translation for the Hindi words used in this book.

    I think it would've been better if the book itself contained a translation of said words, so that non-Indian readers wouldn't have a hard time looking the words up every time then going back to reading.

    All in all, this was such a great read and I'm so glad I picked it up.

  • Sahitya

    I so wanted to love this book. I was actually very sure that I would adore it. I won’t say that my expectations were necessarily very high, but I just felt it in my bones and all I’m feeling is sad after finishing the book.

    Though I’ve been blogging for around 2 years now, I’m still not very observant and tend to not notice any flaws or problematic issues or cliches in the writing unless they are very explicit. I actually had to ask my other blogger friends what it meant when reviewers talked abo

    I so wanted to love this book. I was actually very sure that I would adore it. I won’t say that my expectations were necessarily very high, but I just felt it in my bones and all I’m feeling is sad after finishing the book.

    Though I’ve been blogging for around 2 years now, I’m still not very observant and tend to not notice any flaws or problematic issues or cliches in the writing unless they are very explicit. I actually had to ask my other blogger friends what it meant when reviewers talked about show vs tell style of writing. So, imagine my surprise when for the first couple of chapters, there was just telling and no showing in this book at all, and even I was able to recognize that. It wasn’t bad per se but I guess it just wasn’t a great beginning but it turned better once we got into the meat of the story. The book is fairly fast paced throughout, with lots of hilarious and embarrassing dating situations which were entertaining to read about, but sometimes also fell into typical South Asian stereotypes. I obviously enjoyed all the desi elements of the book - food, culture, language, parents’ expectations regarding dating and marriage, arrange marriage system and all the nosy aunties and especially Bollywood. There are so many references to movies and songs and actors which I absolutely loved and found very organic to the story, but I don’t know how readers who aren’t familiar with the industry would feel about it. There was a particular situation that made me feel very nostalgic when the main character starts sobbing uncontrollably while watching the movie Veer Zara and the Tere Liye song starts playing - while this happens to her during a flight journey, it completely transported me to a train journey I took a long time ago when I too started sobbing while listening to the same song. The main character’s reaction when she visits India also felt very relatable and I couldn’t stop reminiscing about my own experiences. It’s these little little moments in the book that made it worth reading for me.

    I can’t say the same for the main character Leila. She maybe twenty six years old but is very confused and judgmental, and I was both frustrated with her and felt sympathetic towards her plight. I really felt for her desperation about wanting to get married while also wanting to choose the guy and pleasing her parents, and also answering every single nosy question all the time. I could totally understand the pressure she was under because however dramatic it might seem, it is a reality for many South Asian women. However, she had too many cinematic expectations about romance and marriage and that felt pretty childish. And while I do agree that most of her dates were terrible, they were also quite caricaturish. And she kept questioning her self worth because of a guy and I absolutely hated it, because I guess I just wanted something more from a high school teacher from LA. She was very indecisive throughout, mostly making decisions based on what her friends suggested or her mother manipulated her into. I just wanted her to introspect what she wanted for herself and stand up to her parents. And when it finally happened, I found it to be too little too late and it totally frustrated me because she didn’t even come to that conclusion on her own.

    I’m actually not sure how to conclude my review. This book has quite a few rave reviews, so maybe I’m being overly harsh in my judgement. The writing was funny for the most part and very relatable to me as an ownvoices Indian reader (not Muslim though). It’s also a very fast read and I got through it in just a few hours. I think I wanted more from the main character and was disappointed in that regard. I won’t say that I don’t recommend it, because it might just be to someone else’s taste and I wouldn’t want to dissuade any readers.

  • peachygirl

    I wanted to love this book, I really did. But I had so many issues with the protagonist and her attitude. For a 26 year old high school teacher, Liela was very immature, indecisive and judgemental. Her Bollywood dreams for a love story felt like a 14 year old's soliloquy. And her unrealistic expectations for a Mr.Perfect made me roll my eyes constantly.

    Her plight was relatable to some extent as the pressure to m

    I wanted to love this book, I really did. But I had so many issues with the protagonist and her attitude. For a 26 year old high school teacher, Liela was very immature, indecisive and judgemental. Her Bollywood dreams for a love story felt like a 14 year old's soliloquy. And her unrealistic expectations for a Mr.Perfect made me roll my eyes constantly.

    Her plight was relatable to some extent as the pressure to marry at the right age is common in India, as are nosy relatives. Even the writing was pretty good for a debut. But the writer could have tried to stencil a better heroine than this clueless damsel in distress. Also the fact that she's a stickler about not paying for her meal made me respect her less and less. The ending was nice. Leila putting her self worth before her parents' expectations was a good take. But it felt little after everything she went through to please her parents.

    Not that this was a bad book, but I wasn't satisfied with it. Others might like it, if only for the hilarity in Leila's series of horrible dates. Maybe, it was just me!

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