On the Ice

On the Ice

For college sophomore Mitch Greyson, determination and persistence are the name of the game if he wants to make it as a professional hockey player. A busy schedule of practices, games, classes, homework, two part-time jobs—and now, working with a tutor to help him pass the class he’s failing so that he can keep his scholarship—shouldn’t leave him with enough time to flirt...

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Title:On the Ice
Author:Amy Aislin
Rating:
Edition Language:English

On the Ice Reviews

  • Tracy~Bayou Book Junkie

    5 Stars

    Mitch is a college sophomore, trying to juggle school and hockey along with two jobs. Cut off by his mother after he refuses to attend business school and prepare to join the family business, Mitch is just trying to survive. He meets pro-hockey player, Alex when Alex sits on a panel at his school. Mitch is instantly attracted to Alex and tries to turn on the charm, but Alex is demisexual, so it doesn’t work, but while he may not be sexually attracted to Mitch, something about him draws Al

    5 Stars

    Mitch is a college sophomore, trying to juggle school and hockey along with two jobs. Cut off by his mother after he refuses to attend business school and prepare to join the family business, Mitch is just trying to survive. He meets pro-hockey player, Alex when Alex sits on a panel at his school. Mitch is instantly attracted to Alex and tries to turn on the charm, but Alex is demisexual, so it doesn’t work, but while he may not be sexually attracted to Mitch, something about him draws Alex in, but Alex wants, no, needs, to get to know the real Mitch, not the arrogant, obnoxious flirt Mitch puts out there for everyone else.

    I wasn’t too sure about Mitch at first. He was a bit, well okay, a lot obnoxious and pushy, something I can’t stand, but when you peel away the layers, and really get to know Mitch, his situation is heartbreaking. I was exhausted just reading his routine of practice, school and work, then to try to fit in a relationship, well, I just wasn’t sure where he’d find another spare second.

    I loved Alex, as well. He was sweet, caring and confident. I loved that he was so comfortable in who he was. I didn’t know a lot about demisexuals before this story. I’d only read a couple of books featuring a demisexual, but I found Alex’s story to be very informative, without being boringly educational, I learned a lot reading it and I think I understand it much more now.

    The story was well-written and while it maybe dragged just a bit in the middle, I was never bored and I ate up the pages of this book. I wanted a conclusion, and while I got an amazing ending, I wasn’t ready to say goodbye to Mitch and Alex. They had awesome chemistry and I loved the slow progression of their relationship, it was very natural. It definitely wasn’t rushed and not only did they get to know each other, but they were well-developed, so I got to know them, too.

    There were some great secondary characters as well. A few of Alex and Mitch’s teammates were awesome and I absolutely adored Mitch’s best friend and roommate, Cody and am really hoping his story is next. I also loved Alex’s mom, she was such an amazing woman and a great support system for both Alex and Mitch.

    This was an enjoyable story and I can’t wait for the next book in the series. Very recommendable!

    *copy provided by author/publisher for my reading pleasure, a review was not a requirement*

  • Cadiva

    Well this was an utter surprise and a very pleasant one. I've never read Amy Aislin before but I shall definitely be keeping an eye out for more of this series.

    I absolutely adored it. This is slow burn but with a difference because NHL defensive lineman Alex is demisexual and he needs to be emotionally connected to someone before he even thinks about having feelings of sexual attraction.

    Mitch, on the other hand, is younger and, on the face of it, way more confident. He's bold and brash but hidin

    Well this was an utter surprise and a very pleasant one. I've never read Amy Aislin before but I shall definitely be keeping an eye out for more of this series.

    I absolutely adored it. This is slow burn but with a difference because NHL defensive lineman Alex is demisexual and he needs to be emotionally connected to someone before he even thinks about having feelings of sexual attraction.

    Mitch, on the other hand, is younger and, on the face of it, way more confident. He's bold and brash but hiding a lot of hurt and loss underneath his veneer of self-assurance. He's been putting a brave face on for so long, he's lost the ability to be himself. But, if he wants Alex, that's what he's got to be.

    The slow, slow burn in this is beautifully written. Alex is repulsed at first by Mitch's open come ons and he doesn't want to get involved. But once he sees that the visible Mitch isn't the real one, he's intrigued and, as he begins to tutor him for a class he can't afford to fail while out on an injury leave, Alex starts to to get that emotional connection.

    I have to say, the only aspect of this one that didn't quite work for me was the background to why Mitch was on his own and struggling so much and, while it was thoroughly explained and was a perfectly reasonable reason, I think I needed maybe a tiny bit more interaction with his mother for it to be sold perfectly. Especially the bits with his brother.

    There's a great bunch of secondary characters in this one and a very visual setting which was well described and I'm hoping there's going to be more involving the guys from Mitch's college team and some of Alex's Tampa teammates.

    I loved that there was a long time period over which this story was told as well, running from 2008 through to 2015 and the final chapter/epilogue was so ridiculously sweet it had me tearing up - which doesn't happen often!

    Sports romances are one of my favourite tropes because they provide me with hope that, eventually, the toxic masculinity present in so many of the "big name" games will fade away and it won't matter about someone's sexuality - just how well they can play.

  • Nazanin ex-Profile

    +5 stars! I enjoyed this slow-burn story so much! Mitch and Alex were adorable and perfect for each other *sigh. Definitely going to check Amy Aislin's other books.

  • Amanda

    On the Ice is a really sweet story that revolves around two hockey players. Mitch is a college player who is not only dedicated to the sport but also a total math and science geek. Mitch is a total slut and was hitting on Alex at first sight. After being rejected, his ego was bruised, but his passion for sport and studies manages to attract Alex to befriend him.

    Alex is only 24, but he feels much older to me, due to his highly responsible personality and maturity. When he decided to help tutor M

    On the Ice is a really sweet story that revolves around two hockey players. Mitch is a college player who is not only dedicated to the sport but also a total math and science geek. Mitch is a total slut and was hitting on Alex at first sight. After being rejected, his ego was bruised, but his passion for sport and studies manages to attract Alex to befriend him.

    Alex is only 24, but he feels much older to me, due to his highly responsible personality and maturity. When he decided to help tutor Mitch, they started to become friends and he gets to see the real and vulnerable Mitch behind the devil-may-care-attitude.

    This story feels a bit YA-ish because Alex is a demisexual and the couple didn't have any sexual relationship until way past 60%. In the romance world, Alex is a rare unicorn. Is refreshing to read about characters that actually takes time to know and develop feelings for each other before things progress to the bedroom. The slow burn is so worth it. I enjoyed the friendship and the bond they formed, how they act as a moral support for each other and even sustaining a long distance relationship.

    The supporting cast was great too, especially Mitch's bff, Cody, Mitch's dad and some of the teammates. Mitch and Alex are not out athletes, but their team isn't homophobic. It seems like they keep their relationship in a down low and realistic way. There isn't much drama in the story, just plenty of sweet moments and love.

  • namericanwordcat

    3.5 Stars.

    I loved the romance at the center of the book between Mitch and Alex. Mitch's first cocky bold approach and then Alex demanding he be real.

    As Alex is demisexual, we get a slow burn romance which creates lots of space for emotionial connection.

    Alex is just a solidly great guy and so comfortable in his own skin.

    Mitch is really wonderful too and the dates and falling in love as they handle a long distance relationship is well done.

    Outside the romance, there needs to be better work with

    3.5 Stars.

    I loved the romance at the center of the book between Mitch and Alex. Mitch's first cocky bold approach and then Alex demanding he be real.

    As Alex is demisexual, we get a slow burn romance which creates lots of space for emotionial connection.

    Alex is just a solidly great guy and so comfortable in his own skin.

    Mitch is really wonderful too and the dates and falling in love as they handle a long distance relationship is well done.

    Outside the romance, there needs to be better work with the other issues. Mitch's hardworking exhaustion is done well as his Alex's family and they both have good friends. However, Mitch's mom is drawn as a villain too simply and his dad's cluelessness as well as the length of his brother's reaction to something that happen makes little sense.

    Good overall! I look forward to Cody or Yeager's story.

  • BWT (Belen)

    At the start of

    , which spans seven years, Mitch Greyson is nineteen, brilliant, broke, and running himself ragged trying to attain his goals. Alex Dean, is twenty-four, has a broken arm, and being on the NHL's injured player list, time to return to old stomping grounds in Glen Hill, Vermont so he can heal, visit with his grandfather, and catch up with his college buddies. One of those friends is a TA for the one class that Mitch just can't quite pass and, through a series of events, A

    At the start of

    , which spans seven years, Mitch Greyson is nineteen, brilliant, broke, and running himself ragged trying to attain his goals. Alex Dean, is twenty-four, has a broken arm, and being on the NHL's injured player list, time to return to old stomping grounds in Glen Hill, Vermont so he can heal, visit with his grandfather, and catch up with his college buddies. One of those friends is a TA for the one class that Mitch just can't quite pass and, through a series of events, Alex ends up tutoring Mitch.

    Mitch rubs Alex the wrong way from the start - he's too cocky, too smart for his own good, and Alex doesn't like the facade Mitch puts on for the world. Alex at twenty-four years old can count on one finger the number of times he’d been sexually attracted to someone. He's not interested in hook ups, or kissing, or messing around.

    Mitch, hiding his heart away, keeps to hook ups only to prevent his already battered heart from being hurt even more. But Alex is different, and Mitch recognizes how special he is, and is willing to be friends first and hope attraction eventually follows.

    Alex, it turns out, is demisexual, and while I cheer for any inclusivity of the asexual spectrum, and was really happy with the portrayal of Alex and Mitch getting to know one another and eventually fall for each other without sex being the end-all-be-all, the reader

    hammered with the definition and repetition of demisexual to a point where it became a bit annoying. Thankfully the characters are well written and when the reader isn't being told once again that Alex is demi, or having demi defined

    , there's a really sweet, slow burn romance that has a fantastic HEA ending.

    I'm a sucker for a sports romance, especially centered around hockey.

    .

    Recommended.

  • Cheri

    There were so many things I loved about this book. I loved the characters. I loved their romance. I loved how their relationship built from awkwardness to friendship to lovers. I am always glad to see demisexuality portrayed so well in a book.

    However, and this will probably not bother most readers but it really bothered me. The author made a big deal in her acknowledgements that she worked with someone else for the hockey stuff. She obviously didn't choose a person who knew about college hockey

    There were so many things I loved about this book. I loved the characters. I loved their romance. I loved how their relationship built from awkwardness to friendship to lovers. I am always glad to see demisexuality portrayed so well in a book.

    However, and this will probably not bother most readers but it really bothered me. The author made a big deal in her acknowledgements that she worked with someone else for the hockey stuff. She obviously didn't choose a person who knew about college hockey very well. Oh, there were several key words, picking a conference that actually exists, naming schools. Hockey schedules aren't like basketball schedules. College hockey is almost exclusively played as Friday-Saturday series at one site, with a few Thursday or Sunday games and maybe a home and home. It isn't random Wednesday night games. It's not often televised. The draft happens when players are 17-20, with most players being 18 when they're drafted. It's again not like basketball where you get drafted after college. And there is this whole pesky NCAA involvement where there is no way that a former player would ever

    And knowing all of this it drove me completely crazy.

    It was the fact that it felt like the author did no real research about the subject that dropped this probably otherwise a 4.5-5 star read down to a 3 star read to me. Some of this is real quick type into Google research. Some of it is me getting a bit nitpicky and I know this, but college hockey is something I love and follow avidly, and the author didn't know her subject at all.

  • Line

    I don't really know what to do with this one.

    There were some true WTF-moments that had me considering a DNF or a lower rating, but then it turned around again so it wasn't a complete disaster, making this a mixed bag of tricks.

    - The amount of times that demisexual was explained. When we got to the third time, I decided there would be a test at the end of this, why else would it be repeated again and again?

    But I can totally ace it now; it means that they only like short people, right?!

    I don't really know what to do with this one.

    There were some true WTF-moments that had me considering a DNF or a lower rating, but then it turned around again so it wasn't a complete disaster, making this a mixed bag of tricks.

    - The amount of times that demisexual was explained. When we got to the third time, I decided there would be a test at the end of this, why else would it be repeated again and again?

    But I can totally ace it now; it means that they only like short people, right?!? (That's a joke, from the book!)

    - Mitch's parents; and I'm

    including his father in this! Why that fucktard would stay with the abusive bitch and in the end claim ignorance to everything, had me believeing he was a special sort of father. The sort that was blind, inattentive and generally just not that observant of his own children.

    Also the crap that they had been on the brink of divorce for years, meant that he knew something was rotten, but didn't do anything about it...

    .

    -Mitch's brother Dan and the forgiveness of his shitty behaviour... Just stop it! I don't like insta-love, and I don't like insta-forgiveness. This was just so... Misplaced and glossed over, it was... It fell flat for me.

    - How these two donuts managed to keep their relationship a secret!

    I mean between them and their big mouths and their public flirting and their public canoodling it is a wonder that they are not outed.

    And to be honest, I didn't buy it, which is why it's also in the negatives. It was just, completely unrealistic, and at one point I asked myself if we're really that stupid, and maybe we are, I just didn't find them discreet and thus I didn't buy that part of the story.

    - The humour. At times I found it fun and lighthearted, which I needed when I read it.

    - The romance. I loved their relationship, when they got to it. I thought the slow-burn was delicious, and it worked well for this story and the demisexuality meant that there was no cheating (also a joke from the book).

    - The friends. They were supportive and fun and I liked them quite a bit. I am especially interested in Cody's story, which I'm hoping will be the next one?

    I think it was hinted that he identified as demi as well, which would hopefully make his story a slow-burn as well.

    But yeah, this was a mixture and it wasn't all bad, but it didn't blow my socks off either.

  • Heather K (dentist in my spare time)

    I love hockey books and I love books with MCs all over the queer spectrum, so a book where the MC is a

    should have been right up my alley. Sadly, this book felt like pieces of a puzzle that didn't

    fit together.

    It seems like ALL of my friends love this one, so maybe it was just my mood, but I found the book to be strangely written.

    He was supposed to be this closeted guy who was very closed off to others, but then he would

    I love hockey books and I love books with MCs all over the queer spectrum, so a book where the MC is a

    should have been right up my alley. Sadly, this book felt like pieces of a puzzle that didn't

    fit together.

    It seems like ALL of my friends love this one, so maybe it was just my mood, but I found the book to be strangely written.

    He was supposed to be this closeted guy who was very closed off to others, but then he would blatantly flirt and be very obvious in public. His family dynamics were also all over the map, and I didn't buy that his dad didn't know what was happening with Mitch and his mom to the extent that it was shown. Then there was that strange situation with his brother that no one but Mitch seemed to address. It was just... odd.

    There was also

    , which always bothers me. I hate when things feel inorganic, and the way that a lot of things were explained (like demisexuality) were very dry and unnatural-feeling.

    I didn't feel much, if any, chemistry. There were also a few too many "coincidences" in the story: Mitch needing a tutor (ps, what pro hockey player would tutor in his spare time??), Mitch working where Alex's grandfather was placed (who didn't see that coming?!), and just other strange coincidences like that. It gave the story a forced feel that I didn't care for.

    I don't know, with the plethora of amazing hockey romances out there, this one didn't stand out, at least not for the right reasons.

    *Copy provided in exchange for an honest review*

  • Joyfully Jay

    Sports and athletes of all kinds can sell me on a book just like that. There then needs to be something else to hook me in and this book did not do the best job with that. To start, the author’s note states that Mitch and Alex were introduced in a previously published novella as side characters where they had already been married for six years. On the Ice then takes us back to when they met and right off, that set up didn’t interest me.

    Mitch is confident and smart a

    Sports and athletes of all kinds can sell me on a book just like that. There then needs to be something else to hook me in and this book did not do the best job with that. To start, the author’s note states that Mitch and Alex were introduced in a previously published novella as side characters where they had already been married for six years. On the Ice then takes us back to when they met and right off, that set up didn’t interest me.

    Mitch is confident and smart and knows exactly what he wants in the way of a career. When Alex is part of a guest panel in one of his classes, he has a list of questions and the flirting is just a bonus. But, there was that something about Mitch that was off, like terms he used such as “holy jumping hockey sticks.” Also, in describing the side characters, the author would have Mitch run through their characteristics in his head. Like when Mitch saw his best friend and roommate, Cody, that he had known since first grade, or his teammates, his mind made a list of what these people looked like and it was not natural and came off as clunky.

    Then, there was Alex. Alex is demisexual and has never really been attracted to anyone. He doesn’t like Mitch at first, finds him too overwhelming, and it’s a gradual process for them to become friends, and then move on to a relationship. More than once, when Alex being demisexual was discussed, he would launch into a definition of what it was. While the author does note at the end of the book that since the book takes place in 2008/2009, an explanation was needed as demisexual was not as commonly known during that time, the repeated textbook definition was not natural to the flow of conversation.

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