The Hound of Justice

The Hound of Justice

Dr. Janet Watson and former covert agent Sara Holmes, introduced in the acclaimed A Study in Honor, continue their dangerous investigation into the new American Civil War with the help of fresh allies, advanced technology, and brilliant deduction in this superb reimagining of Sherlock Holmes.It’s been two months since Dr. Janet Watson accepted an offer from Georgetown Univ...

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Title:The Hound of Justice
Author:Claire O'Dell
Rating:

The Hound of Justice Reviews

  • Eric

    Claire O’Dell delivers a stunning thriller in

    . This new chapter in the Janet Watson Chronicles has me already wanting another. Highly Recommended.

    Novels offer us options. One could view novels as paths not taken, and dystopian, political, and near-future fiction can be viewed as the path not yet taken. In recent years, the United States has become a divided nation in ways not thought possible just a few dec

    Claire O’Dell delivers a stunning thriller in

    . This new chapter in the Janet Watson Chronicles has me already wanting another. Highly Recommended.

    Novels offer us options. One could view novels as paths not taken, and dystopian, political, and near-future fiction can be viewed as the path not yet taken. In recent years, the United States has become a divided nation in ways not thought possible just a few decades ago. Hate crimes are on the rise, as is corruption. Citizens of the U.S. are watching one portion of its political elites turn a blind eye to election interference by hostile foreign nations in order to maintain power. The current president lost the popular vote and maintains a 37 – 40% approval rating, no matter what he does, and his administration maintains concentration camps while receiving support from people who dare to call themselves pro-lifers. Dystopian literature looks awful optimistic compared to reality at the moment. Truth and fact themselves are under constant attack. It’s not too difficult to see how with a few things going horribly wrong, a second civil war kicks off. Such a deeply divided U.S.A. forms the backdrop of Claire O’Dell’s

    while getting even more fleshed out in the sequel

    .

    blew me away with its detailed character work and tight story-telling; so, I had high, high expectations for the sequel.

    exceeded my expectations. Claire O’Dell delivered a story with heart, action, and tension in a future that is unfortunately becoming more plausible every day.

    I received a free eBook of

    in exchange for an honest review. Also, I won a paperback advanced review copy in a Goodreads contest that I entered before getting access to the eBook.

    Claire O’Dell delivers a stunning thriller in

    . This new chapter in the Janet Watson Chronicles has me already wanting another. Highly Recommended.

    picks up a few months after the action in

    . Janet Watson works at Georgetown University Hospital while in physical therapy to resume her calling as a surgeon. Sarah Holmes is suspended from work and depressed. Around the time that Janet meets and begins to date a bookstore owner, Holmes becomes obsessed with the fate of Irene Adler. A terrorist group bombs the D.C. area, and Watson’s hospital strains under the weight of internal politics. From there, the story takes off to an America that is at once familiar, fractured, and yet frighteningly possible.

    There exists a mystery here, but it’s not much of a mystery, really. That’s okay, though. Between Watson’s careful, thoughtful observation of life and Holmes’s obsession, these women’s lives make the ride enjoyable. Holmes pretty much has the mystery solved, but to close this ‘case,’ action is required.

    should be categorized as a thriller rather than a mystery because there’s more action than deduction. As a thriller, it works. The pace is much faster than the previous novel while maintaining a compelling level of tension. The story moves easier and faster without losing the touching character moments.

    is intricately plotted with many questions answered and new ones arising. I, for one, look forward to Holmes and Watson’s next adventure.

    Once again, I commend Claire O’Dell’s character work here. I love Janet. I absolutely adore her. She’s a veteran, a surgeon, a journaler, a woman, a friend, a family member, and, most importantly of all, a reader. In the first book, she’s barely holding together. Here, she’s farther along her journey back to being a surgeon. At the end of

    , Janet’s received a new, much more sophisticated, prosthetic that will let her return to her profession. To facilitate that return, she’s entered physical therapy to learn the fine motor control necessary for surgery. Janet continues to build a post-military life, even making friends and rivals at Georgetown University Hospital. Prior to the disappearance of Holmes, she’s settling into something like a routine. Since this is a novel, that routine is quickly broken.

    An advantage of series story-telling is the possibility of real character growth from book to book. Janet has changed; she doesn’t seem to be constantly on edge. As a woman of color, as a soldier suffering from PTSD, she must maintain constant vigilance, but it feels less like she’s fighting for her life at all times. She’s learning how to achieve balance, even to the point where she’s seeking romance. Oddly enough considering the obstacles and threats in it, at the end of the novel Janet’s life is ready to begin a new, better chapter. The story challenges her at every turn, and at each moment, she digs in and does the work.

    For a large portion of the novel, Holmes is absent but not far from Watson’s thoughts. Nevertheless, she drives a lot of tension in the overall plot. Her appearances maintain the same over-the-top characteristics as the first novel. I love reading about this version of Holmes while being thankful such a person isn’t in my life. She’s over-bearing without abiding by social conventions; she’s odd, does what she thinks is best, and is a bad ass. In other words, she fits in with all the other incarnations of Sherlock Holmes. By the end of the novel, we learn some of Sarah’s hidden talents. I’d love to know her history. Not a prequel, mind you, just a back story. And her family, we need to learn more about her family.

    Some readers will find

    too political. To be fair, it is a political book, like many thrillers. The question becomes whether the story serves the politics or the politics serve the story. Here, the politics emerge from the setting. Ms. O’Dell built the world with a second civil war tearing apart the United States, which is, of course, a political decision. However, looking at the current and continually deepening division between everyday Americans over politics, even over basic facts, it’s understandable to extrapolate the current divide into an actual civil war. Starting from the assumption of a near-future civil war, the politics of Hound emerge from the characters rather than being imposed upon the characters by the story.

    Most likely, these readers will react to the fact that this novel deals with racial politics. The U.S. as a nation has never dealt with its racist roots. When someone points out that the nation began with a racial hierarchy codified into its legal structures, this person is often met with disagreement, confusion, and attempts to shut down the conversation. Why? Because talk of racism is uncomfortable, and it goes directly against the myth of American exceptional-ism. To say this country has problems is often seen as being unpatriotic, as if you’re attacking the nation. In an over-simplified view, criticism means hatred of, but in a realistic view, criticism recognizes that no human made endeavor is perfect. Improvements can always be made with critical introspection. This is the view that I see in

    . O’Dell looks at the state of racial relations in the U.S. with empathy, with an acknowledgment that structural equality does not exist in the United States. Rather than sweep it into the background, Ms. O’Dell puts it front and center as seen through the eyes of an empathetic character. That is the political nature of the book.

    It’s clear that Ms. O’Dell did her research on the African-American experience when writing these two books. I could see how this novel would make some people uncomfortable politically, but for me, it’s not a political book. Yes, yes, all fiction is political. What I mean is that it’s not didactic.

    isn’t trying to teach me a lesson. O’Dell tells a story, and it’s a damn good one. It just so happens that this story features a life experience very different from my own.

    Claire O’Dell’s

    solidifies this series as a must buy for me. It adds much more action with the deep character work that I enjoyed in the first book. Janet Watson and Sarah Holmes are worth your time getting to know.

  • William Bentrim

    The Hound of Justice by Claire O’Dell

    This is a book in the Janet Watson Chronicle, a follow up to A Study in Honor. Janet Watson is a surgeon injured in the war. She finds herself embroiled in politics due to her friendship with Sara Holmes, an agent so sometime from some part of the government. Dr. Watson is drawn into the intrigue by her desire to see justice done to a corporation who caused the death of so many soldiers.

    O’Dell provides an in-depth character study of Dr. Watson. Watson suffer

    The Hound of Justice by Claire O’Dell

    This is a book in the Janet Watson Chronicle, a follow up to A Study in Honor. Janet Watson is a surgeon injured in the war. She finds herself embroiled in politics due to her friendship with Sara Holmes, an agent so sometime from some part of the government. Dr. Watson is drawn into the intrigue by her desire to see justice done to a corporation who caused the death of so many soldiers.

    O’Dell provides an in-depth character study of Dr. Watson. Watson suffers from PTSD as well as guilt over what more she should or could of done in the attack that took her arm. Dr. Watson is also looking for love and struggling to find those she can trust.

    The idea of a new Confederacy and a return to wide spread bigotry based on color is repugnant. Dismayingly the headlines seem to indicate that racial and religious bigotry are alive and disgustingly well in a shockingly large splinter of society. O’Dell addresses this and foreshadows a future that could be unless our society rejects the messages of hate that have been promogulated lately.

    This is an entertaining book that provides serious food for thought.

  • Linda Chance

    Whew! I just finished reading the review copy of Hound that I received through Harper Voyager (thank you!). This is one roller coaster of a book — even better than the first one, dare I say?

    As I sat on my sunny deck with traffic noises in the distance, I was transported into the dark, dangerous world of Janet Watson. This is a near-future that is very plausible, and, the tensions and emotions became very real through the skill of the author.

    Janet Watson is a very compelling character: all that

    Whew! I just finished reading the review copy of Hound that I received through Harper Voyager (thank you!). This is one roller coaster of a book — even better than the first one, dare I say?

    As I sat on my sunny deck with traffic noises in the distance, I was transported into the dark, dangerous world of Janet Watson. This is a near-future that is very plausible, and, the tensions and emotions became very real through the skill of the author.

    Janet Watson is a very compelling character: all that anger and fear at war with her hope for a future where she can love again and use her skills to help people. I hope that in the next book (there just has to be more!) Claire O’Dell will get under the skin of Sarah Holmes in much the same way.

  • Jeremy Brett

    Claire O'Dell's follow-up to her wonderful Holmesian pastiche " A Study in Honor" is in every way equal to its predecessor. Once again O'Dell has brought Holmes and Watson to new and modern life in a mystery that reflects the racial and political concerns of our fractured America. O'Dell brings her usual depth of character development and emotion to this new book, focusing particularly on Janet Watson standing alone (whereas the first book charted Janet's relationship with Sara Holmes). Janet is

    Claire O'Dell's follow-up to her wonderful Holmesian pastiche " A Study in Honor" is in every way equal to its predecessor. Once again O'Dell has brought Holmes and Watson to new and modern life in a mystery that reflects the racial and political concerns of our fractured America. O'Dell brings her usual depth of character development and emotion to this new book, focusing particularly on Janet Watson standing alone (whereas the first book charted Janet's relationship with Sara Holmes). Janet is a strong and at the same time broken character, and O'Dell skilfully explores her growth and her coming back from a terrible, terrible place into a more fulfilling life.

  • Liz

    This is an action packed thriller that revolves around a new American confederacy and its message of violence and bigotry. The main characters (a black, lesbian Dr. Watson and her secret agent friend, Sara Holmes) plunge into a life-threatening effort to stop the menacing Brotherhood sect. Along with this, there are subplots involving adjusting to a major physical disability, coping with family changes and a budding new romance. Quite a lot is happening in this book and I think it might be a bit

    This is an action packed thriller that revolves around a new American confederacy and its message of violence and bigotry. The main characters (a black, lesbian Dr. Watson and her secret agent friend, Sara Holmes) plunge into a life-threatening effort to stop the menacing Brotherhood sect. Along with this, there are subplots involving adjusting to a major physical disability, coping with family changes and a budding new romance. Quite a lot is happening in this book and I think it might be a bit too much; however, I did find it an enjoyable read and appreciate that there will be more adventures of this duo in the future.

    I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway for this honest review.

  • Joe Crowe

    (review from an advance copy)

    This book series came along at a great time for me, as the family and I have been in a Sherlock Holmes mood, binge-watching "Elementary," a modern-day procedural where Sherlock has moved to America and Watson is a lady.

    This series also flips Watson's gender, and everyone else's. Sherlock is now Sara, Mycroft is Micha. The characters' roles are flipped as well, with Watson now the lead hero.

    The story isn't a detective procedural, really, as it contains more element

    (review from an advance copy)

    This book series came along at a great time for me, as the family and I have been in a Sherlock Holmes mood, binge-watching "Elementary," a modern-day procedural where Sherlock has moved to America and Watson is a lady.

    This series also flips Watson's gender, and everyone else's. Sherlock is now Sara, Mycroft is Micha. The characters' roles are flipped as well, with Watson now the lead hero.

    The story isn't a detective procedural, really, as it contains more elements of sci-fi spy stories, which is not a complaint. The story isn't merely a Holmes homage, either.

    Claire O'Dell has set this series in a divided near future that isn't too far-fetched, and incredibly strong women are the heroes.

    Against that charged backdrop, the story is engaging, thrilling, and cathartic. Highly recommended.

  • Roberta

    I finally received my ARC of this book, for which I was looking forward to receiving, for my honest review. I am always very appreciative when I receive same even, as is the case here, if it is received later than when one normally receives a book which they have won.

    Nonetheless, I did not finish reading this book for one reason. I understand that the book was a work of fiction, however I resent it when an author attempts to push his or her personal political agenda by using partisan innuendos w

    I finally received my ARC of this book, for which I was looking forward to receiving, for my honest review. I am always very appreciative when I receive same even, as is the case here, if it is received later than when one normally receives a book which they have won.

    Nonetheless, I did not finish reading this book for one reason. I understand that the book was a work of fiction, however I resent it when an author attempts to push his or her personal political agenda by using partisan innuendos within the story. I gulped as I passed over the first one, but continued reading. The second one, however, left no doubt in my mind as to what was occurring.

    The book may have contained an extremely good story. However I'm well past the age where one is brainwashed by a liberal professor into thinking as they do, even if I was already a liberal to begin with. If before the book goes to press for the final version these subtle comments are removed, I'd be more than happy to read the entire book.

  • Divena

    I was so excited about this story but it was just so bland. The story is a twist on Sherlock Holmes but with a disabled, queer, black woman. Yep, 3 boxes of diversity check. It's like the white writer of this story went through a checklist of ways to show she is "woke". This book is set in the near future though it feels exactly like 2019. Our lead is bland and boring always going through the motions of her day to day as a surgeon. She's learning to adapt to her job with her new disability but I

    I was so excited about this story but it was just so bland. The story is a twist on Sherlock Holmes but with a disabled, queer, black woman. Yep, 3 boxes of diversity check. It's like the white writer of this story went through a checklist of ways to show she is "woke". This book is set in the near future though it feels exactly like 2019. Our lead is bland and boring always going through the motions of her day to day as a surgeon. She's learning to adapt to her job with her new disability but I still never really felt for her. I feel like there was a lot of unnecessary diary entries that were overly detailed. The political talk felt hollow and very ironic. Lots of talk of white privilege and how the other side lives and reacts. Except this book was written by a beneficiary of that privilege and she wasn't able to capture the experience of a black woman navigating the world though she tried based off things she's read. I gave this story the rating I did because some parts of the story were mildly entertaining but it wasn't something that made me anticipating the ending.

    I recieved an ARC from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)

    update: I recieved an arc to the sequel to

    . thank you so much to Harper Voyager <3

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  • Lora

    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway, and will review once I've read it.

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