The Hound of Justice

The Hound of Justice

Dr. Janet Watson and former covert agent Sara Holmes, introduced in the acclaimed A Study in Honor, continue their dangerous investigation into the new American Civil War with the help of fresh allies, advanced technology, and brilliant deduction in this superb reimagining of Sherlock Holmes.It’s been two months since Dr. Janet Watson accepted an offer from Georgetown...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Hound of Justice
Author:Claire O'Dell
Rating:

The Hound of Justice Reviews

  • Eric

    Claire O’Dell delivers a stunning thriller in

    . This new chapter in the Janet Watson Chronicles has me already wanting another. Highly Recommended.

    Novels offer us options. One could view novels as paths not taken, and dystopian, political, and near-future fiction can be viewed as the path not yet taken. In recent years, the United States has become a divided nation in ways not thought possible just a few

    Claire O’Dell delivers a stunning thriller in

    . This new chapter in the Janet Watson Chronicles has me already wanting another. Highly Recommended.

    Novels offer us options. One could view novels as paths not taken, and dystopian, political, and near-future fiction can be viewed as the path not yet taken. In recent years, the United States has become a divided nation in ways not thought possible just a few decades ago. Hate crimes are on the rise, as is corruption. Citizens of the U.S. are watching one portion of its political elites turn a blind eye to election interference by hostile foreign nations in order to maintain power. The current president lost the popular vote and maintains a 37 – 40% approval rating, no matter what he does, and his administration maintains concentration camps while receiving support from people who dare to call themselves pro-lifers. Dystopian literature looks awful optimistic compared to reality at the moment. Truth and fact themselves are under constant attack. It’s not too difficult to see how with a few things going horribly wrong, a second civil war kicks off. Such a deeply divided U.S.A. forms the backdrop of Claire O’Dell’s

    while getting even more fleshed out in the sequel

    .

    blew me away with its detailed character work and tight story-telling; so, I had high, high expectations for the sequel.

    exceeded my expectations. Claire O’Dell delivered a story with heart, action, and tension in a future that is unfortunately becoming more plausible every day.

    I received a free eBook of

    in exchange for an honest review. Also, I won a paperback advanced review copy in a Goodreads contest that I entered before getting access to the eBook.

    Claire O’Dell delivers a stunning thriller in

    . This new chapter in the Janet Watson Chronicles has me already wanting another. Highly Recommended.

    picks up a few months after the action in

    . Janet Watson works at Georgetown University Hospital while in physical therapy to resume her calling as a surgeon. Sarah Holmes is suspended from work and depressed. Around the time that Janet meets and begins to date a bookstore owner, Holmes becomes obsessed with the fate of Irene Adler. A terrorist group bombs the D.C. area, and Watson’s hospital strains under the weight of internal politics. From there, the story takes off to an America that is at once familiar, fractured, and yet frighteningly possible.

    There exists a mystery here, but it’s not much of a mystery, really. That’s okay, though. Between Watson’s careful, thoughtful observation of life and Holmes’s obsession, these women’s lives make the ride enjoyable. Holmes pretty much has the mystery solved, but to close this ‘case,’ action is required.

    should be categorized as a thriller rather than a mystery because there’s more action than deduction. As a thriller, it works. The pace is much faster than the previous novel while maintaining a compelling level of tension. The story moves easier and faster without losing the touching character moments.

    is intricately plotted with many questions answered and new ones arising. I, for one, look forward to Holmes and Watson’s next adventure.

    Once again, I commend Claire O’Dell’s character work here. I love Janet. I absolutely adore her. She’s a veteran, a surgeon, a journaler, a woman, a friend, a family member, and, most importantly of all, a reader. In the first book, she’s barely holding together. Here, she’s farther along her journey back to being a surgeon. At the end of

    , Janet’s received a new, much more sophisticated, prosthetic that will let her return to her profession. To facilitate that return, she’s entered physical therapy to learn the fine motor control necessary for surgery. Janet continues to build a post-military life, even making friends and rivals at Georgetown University Hospital. Prior to the disappearance of Holmes, she’s settling into something like a routine. Since this is a novel, that routine is quickly broken.

    An advantage of series story-telling is the possibility of real character growth from book to book. Janet has changed; she doesn’t seem to be constantly on edge. As a woman of color, as a soldier suffering from PTSD, she must maintain constant vigilance, but it feels less like she’s fighting for her life at all times. She’s learning how to achieve balance, even to the point where she’s seeking romance. Oddly enough considering the obstacles and threats in it, at the end of the novel Janet’s life is ready to begin a new, better chapter. The story challenges her at every turn, and at each moment, she digs in and does the work.

    For a large portion of the novel, Holmes is absent but not far from Watson’s thoughts. Nevertheless, she drives a lot of tension in the overall plot. Her appearances maintain the same over-the-top characteristics as the first novel. I love reading about this version of Holmes while being thankful such a person isn’t in my life. She’s over-bearing without abiding by social conventions; she’s odd, does what she thinks is best, and is a bad ass. In other words, she fits in with all the other incarnations of Sherlock Holmes. By the end of the novel, we learn some of Sarah’s hidden talents. I’d love to know her history. Not a prequel, mind you, just a back story. And her family, we need to learn more about her family.

    Some readers will find

    too political. To be fair, it is a political book, like many thrillers. The question becomes whether the story serves the politics or the politics serve the story. Here, the politics emerge from the setting. Ms. O’Dell built the world with a second civil war tearing apart the United States, which is, of course, a political decision. However, looking at the current and continually deepening division between everyday Americans over politics, even over basic facts, it’s understandable to extrapolate the current divide into an actual civil war. Starting from the assumption of a near-future civil war, the politics of Hound emerge from the characters rather than being imposed upon the characters by the story.

    Most likely, these readers will react to the fact that this novel deals with racial politics. The U.S. as a nation has never dealt with its racist roots. When someone points out that the nation began with a racial hierarchy codified into its legal structures, this person is often met with disagreement, confusion, and attempts to shut down the conversation. Why? Because talk of racism is uncomfortable, and it goes directly against the myth of American exceptional-ism. To say this country has problems is often seen as being unpatriotic, as if you’re attacking the nation. In an over-simplified view, criticism means hatred of, but in a realistic view, criticism recognizes that no human made endeavor is perfect. Improvements can always be made with critical introspection. This is the view that I see in

    . O’Dell looks at the state of racial relations in the U.S. with empathy, with an acknowledgment that structural equality does not exist in the United States. Rather than sweep it into the background, Ms. O’Dell puts it front and center as seen through the eyes of an empathetic character. That is the political nature of the book.

    It’s clear that Ms. O’Dell did her research on the African-American experience when writing these two books. I could see how this novel would make some people uncomfortable politically, but for me, it’s not a political book. Yes, yes, all fiction is political. What I mean is that it’s not didactic.

    isn’t trying to teach me a lesson. O’Dell tells a story, and it’s a damn good one. It just so happens that this story features a life experience very different from my own.

    Claire O’Dell’s

    solidifies this series as a must buy for me. It adds much more action with the deep character work that I enjoyed in the first book. Janet Watson and Sarah Holmes are worth your time getting to know.

  • Darlene

    Part of what determines whether I give a book four or five stars on Goodreads is if I find myself at odd times of the day wanting to go back to reading it, or when it keeps me up late to finish.

    is one such novel, an excellent follow-up to the first of the Janet Watson Chronicles. Because we are already familiar with the near-future dystopian America from

    we can get right into the story, and I especially enjoyed seeing Dr. Watson try to re-establish herself

    Part of what determines whether I give a book four or five stars on Goodreads is if I find myself at odd times of the day wanting to go back to reading it, or when it keeps me up late to finish.

    is one such novel, an excellent follow-up to the first of the Janet Watson Chronicles. Because we are already familiar with the near-future dystopian America from

    we can get right into the story, and I especially enjoyed seeing Dr. Watson try to re-establish herself as a successful surgeon.

    We also learn more about Sara's family, Janet's dating life, Janet's family, and why the Confederacy continues to wreak havoc on society in a divided country. I liked the focus on the characters in this book (even more than the mystery) and it bodes well for further Holmes/Watson stories going forward.

  • Marlene

    Originally published at

    The Hound of Justice is even better than A Study in Honor, and I loved A Study in Honor. But Study needs to set itself up in its near-future variation on our world and its not-quite-pastiche of Holmes and Watson.

    When the action picks up in Hound, we’re already there. We know who these women are, and we recognize their world – it’s all too close to our own.

    It’s a world that feels like a direct – and not very far future descendant – of the world we know now.

    Originally published at

    The Hound of Justice is even better than A Study in Honor, and I loved A Study in Honor. But Study needs to set itself up in its near-future variation on our world and its not-quite-pastiche of Holmes and Watson.

    When the action picks up in Hound, we’re already there. We know who these women are, and we recognize their world – it’s all too close to our own.

    It’s a world that feels like a direct – and not very far future descendant – of the world we know now. Obama was president, and so was Trump. And the U.S. flirted with fascism during the presidency of Trump and his enablers.

    Resulting in a leftist backlash, and now a right-center response to that backlash. This is a future that is well within the lifetime of all of us reading the book, and it feels all-too-plausible from here.

    Damn it.

    It also feels like a variation of the alternative history of last year’s awesome American War. Because somewhere in those swings of the political pendulum, the New Confederacy declared war on the Federal States. It’s an ugly, brutal war, because civil wars are seldom civil at all.

    And there are entirely too many people on the side of the supposedly liberal Federal States whose beliefs align much more closely with the Confederacy. Along with entirely too many people who profit from the chaos and carnage – and only care that it continues as long as bloody possible.

    After the events of A Study in Honor, Sara Holmes and Dr. Janet Watson are living in the aftermath, where they were right for the wrong reasons, and Sara went rogue from her alphabet agency handlers to get the job done.

    The problem is that the job was only partially done. Holmes and Watson will have to go behind enemy lines to finish it.

    Or be finished.

    Escape Rating A: I found the story in The Hound of Justice to be both fascinating and predictable, and those two things shouldn’t go together – but they do in this case. They really, really do.

    Partially, it is that I love the setup. I hate that it feels so very plausible, but it works all too well. It feels like a logical extension of the current political climate – to the point that I was glad to see that my present home of Atlanta does stay within the Federal States.

    The Federal States haven’t reached the level of being dystopian, at least not yet. And at least not if you are not black or brown or gay or gender nonconforming or female. Also probably not if you are some variety of Christian, but the fault lines on that particularly axis are not obvious so far, as our heroines are black, lesbian professional women.

    Or really, heroine, singular. As in the original Holmes stories, Watson is telling the story of her life with – and often without – Holmes. But the Holmes of the Janet Watson Chronicles is even more mercurial – and less forthcoming – than the original. Truly this is Janet Watson’s story, while Holmes is a catalyst for events more than a participant.

    And that’s a good thing, because this Holmes seems to have the emotional depths of a teaspoon – and the original, particularly at the beginning, wasn’t much better.

    Janet Watson, on the other hand, feels too much. She’s a wounded war veteran (as was the original) who has to cope with the temporary and perhaps permanent loss of her identity as a surgeon. And has to deal with her ongoing PTSD, a condition that is exacerbated by the events of this story.

    Because she feels, we feel with her. Her hopes, her fears, her dreams and especially her nightmares. Because she has to live them, over and over again. And yet, she keeps going. It’s the journey that she keeps going on, the road that she keeps traveling in spite of her fear, that make this story so fascinating.

    The predictability factor comes from knowing just a bit about the original Holmes. And on the nature of fiction in series.

    The villain was who the villain had to be, because there were so many clues about that job not being taken care of the first time. It just couldn’t be anyone else, particularly with such similar methods. The title of this story is a play on The Hound of the Baskervilles, a story which takes place just before Holmes’ “death” at Reichenbach Falls. Another clue to the ultimate ending of this version.

    But there is so much marvelously taut tension in how The Hound of Justice gets from its bloody beginning to its cathartic but not quite victorious end that I got sucked in on the opening page and couldn’t put it down.

    I hope that the author returns to these characters and this world, whenever. Preferably ASAP.

  • Alison

    My only complaint about this book is that it takes nearly half the book until the main plot gets going. Don’t get me wrong I love Janet Watson, but I wanted to see more interaction between her and Sara Holmes. There was barely any Sara! The first 141 pages could have been condensed into 50 pages I feel- so much setup for the actual conflict to get going.

    When it got going though, I was so engaged! Loved the action and the espionage, Janet worked so well like that, instead of moping around the

    My only complaint about this book is that it takes nearly half the book until the main plot gets going. Don’t get me wrong I love Janet Watson, but I wanted to see more interaction between her and Sara Holmes. There was barely any Sara! The first 141 pages could have been condensed into 50 pages I feel- so much setup for the actual conflict to get going.

    When it got going though, I was so engaged! Loved the action and the espionage, Janet worked so well like that, instead of moping around the hospital. I appreciate the story and the diversions it takes from the original, and love all the discussion on racism, politics, and PTSD.

    Also, something to be considered is that the author is a white woman writing about multiple black characters and exploring black culture- could be problematic and I wonder what black readers would think about these depictions. I personally loved that nearly every single character was a POC and there were multiple queer relationships, but it definitely isn’t an own voices novel.

  • Devann

    actual rating: 3.5

    Another interesting book in this series. This one seemed to have a few more pacing problems than the first. I guess the slow and somewhat meandering beginning is supposed to reflect how Janet is still feeling kind of lost in her life as she is still not able to actually perform surgery again etc, but it still dragged in a few points. I do think Janet is very in character and recognizable as a version of Watson, but Sara still feels a bit off as a version of Sherlock. I think it

    actual rating: 3.5

    Another interesting book in this series. This one seemed to have a few more pacing problems than the first. I guess the slow and somewhat meandering beginning is supposed to reflect how Janet is still feeling kind of lost in her life as she is still not able to actually perform surgery again etc, but it still dragged in a few points. I do think Janet is very in character and recognizable as a version of Watson, but Sara still feels a bit off as a version of Sherlock. I think it might just be because we don't see all that much of her or get into her head at all but something has just felt a bit off about her in both of these books. The plot definitely picked up in the later half of the book and overall I found it to be very enjoyable despite a few hiccups. I'm hoping that it will pick up a bit more in the next book as a reflection of Janet making more progress in her personal life. Definitely an interesting Sherlock Holmes retelling, even if it does get lost in itself a little bit.

  • Joe Crowe

    (review from an advance copy)

    This book series came along at a great time for me, as the family and I have been in a Sherlock Holmes mood, binge-watching "Elementary," a modern-day procedural where Sherlock has moved to America and Watson is a lady.

    This series also flips Watson's gender, and everyone else's. Sherlock is now Sara, Mycroft is Micha. The characters' roles are flipped as well, with Watson now the lead hero.

    The story isn't a detective procedural, really, as it contains more

    (review from an advance copy)

    This book series came along at a great time for me, as the family and I have been in a Sherlock Holmes mood, binge-watching "Elementary," a modern-day procedural where Sherlock has moved to America and Watson is a lady.

    This series also flips Watson's gender, and everyone else's. Sherlock is now Sara, Mycroft is Micha. The characters' roles are flipped as well, with Watson now the lead hero.

    The story isn't a detective procedural, really, as it contains more elements of sci-fi spy stories, which is not a complaint. The story isn't merely a Holmes homage, either.

    Claire O'Dell has set this series in a divided near future that isn't too far-fetched, and incredibly strong women are the heroes.

    Against that charged backdrop, the story is engaging, thrilling, and cathartic. Highly recommended.

  • Barb in Maryland

    Excellent follow-up to 'A Study in Honor'.

    I sure hope the author is planning on bringing us more adventures with Dr Janet Watson. She is awesome!

  • Rike @ RikeRandom

    I'm torn, really torn. I liked this a lot more than the first one. But it's so much about race and especially blackness, black history, black culture and I only just realised that it's written by a white woman and that's kind of a problem simply because race is such an important aspect of the story.

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)

    The title of this book is. a pun and for that I rightfully should have enjoyed this. But… I was honestly pretty disappointed by this? I loved book one of this duology so much and this just wasn’t nearly as good for me.

    I’m going to skip introducing

    and just get right to discussing

    book. The main problem I had with this book is that

    began really grating on me. In book one there were asides to establish the world and add to

    The title of this book is. a pun and for that I rightfully should have enjoyed this. But… I was honestly pretty disappointed by this? I loved book one of this duology so much and this just wasn’t nearly as good for me.

    I’m going to skip introducing

    and just get right to discussing

    book. The main problem I had with this book is that

    began really grating on me. In book one there were asides to establish the world and add to characters, but here I felt like

    ; I honestly began feeling like the book was just telling me more about this world every few paragraphs with no growth or change. I politically agree with everything here so the first time this happened I was sort of like “yes”. But: 1) this is book two so I kinda knew broad details, and 2) I’m sorry but you only have to establish that the world has single-payer healthcare once. You can just say that once and then you can add details to it later. Sometimes when the doctors are talking… the audience will just like.

    The plot described in the blurb is cool, actually, I liked the plot of this a lot and I thought

    But the book gets to

    . At 55% of the way through.

    The first 55% of this book is spent building up to the A plot and spending time making you

    about the B plot, which is fine, but… I think this could’ve been improved by editing down the first half (see above) to maybe 75% of its current length. And then spending extra pagetime in the second half (which is far more streamlined and thus far better) on giving the B plot an on-page resolution (as it is currently resolved offscreen). I am trying to be very unspoilery about what each of these plots are, but: I loved the B plot and I

    wanted that to get more of it in the second half.

    The plot of this book… is actually good, eventually. It’s just that

    By nothing really happens I unfortunately do

    mean that there is no plot but heavy character development; I mean that both characters and plot begin moving very, very slowly.

    In

    , I wrote this:

    The thing is that here, I felt that no themes or existential tensions or characters were actually

    . The character moments themselves are great — Janet in particular gets a lot of pagetime dedicated to her PTSD and I liked that — but it. just doesn’t quite lead to growth. The whole novel feels like

    The relationship between Holmes and Watson, in particular, is just crying out for character growth on both their ends. And I know this is petty but: the fact that they are separated for half the novel seriously fucked with my interest. Like yes, it works narratively, but I am reading this book 65% because that dynamic is so well written.

    I also… I don’t particularly know how to identify this, but I sort of wondered about the reaction of black readers and reviewers to this book? The author is clearly extremely well-intentioned and I know she has done research, but I do wonder in particular about the use of black culture here. This is not a complaint, it’s just something I found myself thinking about.

    This was not in any way an awful book or even really a bad one: there were still a lot of moments I enjoyed, the last 25% has some solidly great writing, I read the last 60% in one sitting so clearly I was engaged, I liked the romance plot a decent amount, and I still am

    invested in the lead character and the dynamic between the two leads.

    .

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

    |

  • Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)

    1.

    - 4/5

    I'm not mad, I'm just disappointed.

    I didn't love the first book. The plot waned and I wasn't a huge fan of the author writing about black women when she's a white woman. Not that it can't be done and done well because I've read books by authors not writing in their same gender, race/ethnicity, or sexual orientation and did it amazingly. But this one felt like it. And while those things lagged, I did love the characters and the world was interesting and it had really good

    1.

    - 4/5

    I'm not mad, I'm just disappointed.

    I didn't love the first book. The plot waned and I wasn't a huge fan of the author writing about black women when she's a white woman. Not that it can't be done and done well because I've read books by authors not writing in their same gender, race/ethnicity, or sexual orientation and did it amazingly. But this one felt like it. And while those things lagged, I did love the characters and the world was interesting and it had really good mental health rep.

    It just felt like this one didn't change much from the first to the second book. It didn't grow any. The plot still was indecipherable for most of the book and when it got to the actual plot of it all, I was so confused. I lost interest. It didn't work for me, much like the first one didn't work. I still hate Sara's employment, really. It's never been properly explained in either book.

    In the end, this fell short. If there are more books coming in this series, I won't check them out.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.