Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do

From one of the world's leading experts on unconscious racial bias, a personal examination of one of the central controversies and culturally powerful issues of our time, and its influence on contemporary race relations and criminal justice.We do not have to be racist to be biased. With a perspective that is both scientific, investigative, and also informed by personal exp...

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Title:Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do
Author:Jennifer L. Eberhardt
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do Reviews

  • Jillian Doherty

    The partial manuscript available was such a good taste - and even when the full book is ready I have a feeling it will still leave you wanting more.

    The well researched and experienced examples of our natural bias are indeed groundbreaking; these experiences are not new and revolutionary moments in time - they are mind-bending because they are so familiar and evergreen struggles.

    Eberhardt brings us to the heart of the issues with a personal voice and detailed understanding of being ripped from

    The partial manuscript available was such a good taste - and even when the full book is ready I have a feeling it will still leave you wanting more.

    The well researched and experienced examples of our natural bias are indeed groundbreaking; these experiences are not new and revolutionary moments in time - they are mind-bending because they are so familiar and evergreen struggles.

    Eberhardt brings us to the heart of the issues with a personal voice and detailed understanding of being ripped from car from a bias police officer, to rediscovering what freedom means alongside a San Quentin inmate she taught.

    This is the kind of read we desperately need.

    Galley borrowed from the publisher.

  • Donna Hines

    "We do not have to be racist to be biased."

    A relevant, heart breaking, emotionally draining look at the heart of America's racial tensions, social inequality, confirmation bias, racial profiling, and the attitudes that are inherently ours.

    Social judgements affect both how we see those around us and how we perceive ourselves.

    Confirmation bias is the mechanism the tool allowing inaccurate beliefs to manifest and persist just as destructive as stereotypes.

    Racial bias leads to the capacity to do har

    "We do not have to be racist to be biased."

    A relevant, heart breaking, emotionally draining look at the heart of America's racial tensions, social inequality, confirmation bias, racial profiling, and the attitudes that are inherently ours.

    Social judgements affect both how we see those around us and how we perceive ourselves.

    Confirmation bias is the mechanism the tool allowing inaccurate beliefs to manifest and persist just as destructive as stereotypes.

    Racial bias leads to the capacity to do harm. It tears away at the very fabric, it pulls the perception of furtive movements .

    "Just as prison is reserved for those considered too dangerous to walk the streets, the death penalty -the ultimate sentence- is reserved for those deemed too evil too live."

    "What becomes the external proxy for internal wickedness? My research has shown that the mere physical features of black defendants can tip the scale toward execution."

    Racial bias is a human problem and one that needs everyone's undivided attention to solve.

    "Marginalized groups in countries all over the world are often discredited through animal imagery."For example Black ape association.

    Increasing rise has come upon dehumanization, in isolation, in societal norms rapidly changing times. In social threats, in school segregation, in bias even during real estate transactions.

    "Whitening the resume" is something many of color are being forced to utilize.

    Awareness leads to change and that is the hope for tomorrow and beyond.

    Thank you to Jennifer L. Eberhardt for this amazing insight as she mentions her own personal trials and tribulations within this insightful read.

    Thank you to the publisher and Goodreads for this early ARC in exchange for this honest review.

  • Amber Nicole

    đź‘Ź Bravo! đź‘Ź

    The description on the jacket of this book is vague, so I assumed when I picked this up that it was on the more "benign" (no bias is really benign) biases that we experience and participate in in our daily lives, and kind of how to counteract that.

    Big nope.

    This book certainly talks about the various forms of bias, big to small, but Dr. Eberhardt focuses on the cause and effect of bias instead. She does a wonderful job of using anecdotes to tell stories of how bias affects the lives of

    đź‘Ź Bravo! đź‘Ź

    The description on the jacket of this book is vague, so I assumed when I picked this up that it was on the more "benign" (no bias is really benign) biases that we experience and participate in in our daily lives, and kind of how to counteract that.

    Big nope.

    This book certainly talks about the various forms of bias, big to small, but Dr. Eberhardt focuses on the cause and effect of bias instead. She does a wonderful job of using anecdotes to tell stories of how bias affects the lives of those around us while filling those stories with facts and statistics. The amount of research discussed here makes my academic's heart flutter, haha. It's an amazing thing she's done in packing in so much research on such a depressing topic without making the book dull.

    I'd say this is required reading for everyone, not just Americans (although the story is told through an American lens).

  • Mehrsa

    One of the best books about implicit bias I've ever read. It's both personal and data-based, warm and inviting where it needs to be and cold and honest in other parts. I would recommend this to any organization or person or group who wants to understand how bias works and how it's ok--it's not your fault.

  • Jennie

    Really well written, highly recommend for all kinds of people. Whether you know a lot about the mechanisms behind prejudice already or are just mildly interested in the topic, this is a great book that can hold your interest and give you new things to think about. Eberhardt is clearly a veteran when it comes to presenting material for all kinds of people in an interesting, engaging way. She deftly weaves personal stories into history and sociological studies in a skillful way. I found this book

    Really well written, highly recommend for all kinds of people. Whether you know a lot about the mechanisms behind prejudice already or are just mildly interested in the topic, this is a great book that can hold your interest and give you new things to think about. Eberhardt is clearly a veteran when it comes to presenting material for all kinds of people in an interesting, engaging way. She deftly weaves personal stories into history and sociological studies in a skillful way. I found this book to be super educational, but also weirdly enjoyable despite it being about such a heavy topic. This would be a good pick if you're trying to introduce someone to the topics of prejudice and bias.

  • Mara

    This is the kind of informative nonfiction that I like to see -- clearly written, incorporating broad statistics and study findings with concrete examples, correlating arguments to current or historical events, and the author's use of personal anecdotes or stories told to her to make the content of her work really connect on a personal level. This is a really well executed book on implicit bias that threads the needle between acknowledging that implicit bias is something that we all inherit &

    This is the kind of informative nonfiction that I like to see -- clearly written, incorporating broad statistics and study findings with concrete examples, correlating arguments to current or historical events, and the author's use of personal anecdotes or stories told to her to make the content of her work really connect on a personal level. This is a really well executed book on implicit bias that threads the needle between acknowledging that implicit bias is something that we all inherit & are therefore not personally to blame for the problem's origin while still pushing individuals to do their part to change themselves & the world around them. A few of the stories really stuck with me, particularly the arc of her own son's understanding of his own perceptions of black men & how he is increasingly at the receiving end of those perceptions from others as a young black man.

    Would definitely recommend! I could see this working well for a book club type environment

  • Isabella Zink

    I watched a French movie recently called “He Even Has Your Eyes” about a black couple who adopt a white baby and face both backlash and support from members of their families and the adoption agency. In an early scene the couple sit in the waiting area underneath two photos of white couples holding a black baby and an Asian baby. By the end, a white couple sit in the waiting area under a larger photo of the film’s protagonists posing with their older child and everyone is happy.

    I bring up this

    I watched a French movie recently called “He Even Has Your Eyes” about a black couple who adopt a white baby and face both backlash and support from members of their families and the adoption agency. In an early scene the couple sit in the waiting area underneath two photos of white couples holding a black baby and an Asian baby. By the end, a white couple sit in the waiting area under a larger photo of the film’s protagonists posing with their older child and everyone is happy.

    I bring up this movie because I think it highlights aspects of implicit bias purely from the fact that this situation is “other” —a majority of the adoptions I’m familiar with (in the media, anecdotally, etc. ) feature a white couple and a baby of a different race. In this movie, I experienced a level of cognitive dissonance purely because this was a situation that had really not crossed my mind, and yet I suppose I was biased on some level. One of the film’s antagonists, a social worker, was hell-bent on trying to catch the adoptive parents doing something wrong to validate her own bias instead of recognizing that these were two loving people desperate to give a child a home. At the same time, the adoptive mother’s parents are also angry about the adoption because this baby does not fit the mental image they had of their grandson.

    The point, I think, goes along with Eberhardt’s statement that you don’t have to be racist to be biased. This movie’s simple premise was enough to make me slow down and acknowledge a bias I didn’t expect to crop up and that has no basis in personal experience or association. After reading this book I can appreciate the importance of thinking through reactions like this in an effort to fix them.

    Overall, this book does a great job pointing out the biological and sociological origins of out-group bias, how it pervades our society, and gives some insight into how to combat it.

  • Tangled in Text

    This book started off great. It was fresh and thought-provoking but it seemed as it neared the end to remain focused on one race and not the sense of general bias like the first half. I am a nerd for all the studies and test results though so I remained pretty giddy throughout.

    I loved the analogies so much so I worked them into conversations with friends and family during the week I was reading this. I loved the example that a bias is actually a proven mental shortcoming. Our brains focus on wh

    This book started off great. It was fresh and thought-provoking but it seemed as it neared the end to remain focused on one race and not the sense of general bias like the first half. I am a nerd for all the studies and test results though so I remained pretty giddy throughout.

    I loved the analogies so much so I worked them into conversations with friends and family during the week I was reading this. I loved the example that a bias is actually a proven mental shortcoming. Our brains focus on what they deem important and fade out everything we don’t come in contact with often.

    That can be put towards race if we were raised in a family of one race and that is all we were surrounded by we would be able to more easily distinguish their characteristics and other races might take longer to spot the differences. That same thought process has been proven in different situations as well like a preschool teacher can more quickly tell the different between toddlers because they spend most of their time surrounded by them, but someone like me panics when I see several kids and might think they all look alike. The study results were fascinating to even test theses biases with interracial families or even a family that adopts an older kid of a different race.

    A real life example of this that I thought was fascinating was a bunch of black kids in China town figured out this bias years before any studies proved the results. The teenagers would snatch the purses from old Asian ladies and they wouldn’t even be wearing a mask because they knew when a line up was done, the old ladies never were able to identify who they were only a foot away from earlier that day because they complained they all looked alike. This type of bias though led to profiling as in China town all older women began to fear black males in general and that is when the problems arise.

  • Matt

    Our perception of immigrants is so tied to fear of disease and an assumption of dirtiness that in a study of participants during a period of a flu epidemic, there was a significant difference in negative opinions towards immigrants between those participants who had been vaccinated and those who hadn’t. “Their sense of vulnerability to disease was tied to unacknowledged fears about infected immigrants“.

    In “Bias: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do”, Jennifer L

    Our perception of immigrants is so tied to fear of disease and an assumption of dirtiness that in a study of participants during a period of a flu epidemic, there was a significant difference in negative opinions towards immigrants between those participants who had been vaccinated and those who hadn’t. “Their sense of vulnerability to disease was tied to unacknowledged fears about infected immigrants“.

    In “Bias: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do”, Jennifer L. Eberhardt explores the psychology behind implicit bias, the unconscious automatic associations that we apply towards people according to the viewers’ perception of race. Implicit bias can present itself in a relatively benign fashion such as through the “other-race effect” (the difficulty of a person from one ethnicity to remember or recognize the face of a person from a different ethnicity), but it can also lead to outright prejudicial treatment of certain marginalized groups. This is played out in the United States most severely in the frequent violent and often deadly encounters experienced by members of the black community with police officers.

    Eberhardt gracefully moves between the academic and the deeply personal when addressing these troubling topics. From studies demonstrating an innate “black-crime association” in the minds of whites and police officers to other studies that show that whites perceive black faces that are neutral to instead be hostile, the picture swiftly begins to form of how biological and societal biases have poisoned a police officers’ perception of an interaction with a person of color outside of the presence of any overt racial hatred. Much of our policing and retributive criminal justice system seeks to punish those with internal wickedness, but the author deftly demonstrates that the way we perceive black people externally leads us to assume internal wickedness.

    Eberhardt’s work does not solely focus on policing, there are valuable sections on health, education, and employment (and one section on the tragic Nazi marches in Charlottesville that while interesting, I felt was out of place), but it is clear that the main thrust of her book is an attempt to find some understanding in why so many interactions between the black community and the police end in violence. Eberhardt has taken an immensely challenging subject and allowed her personal experiences to guide the reader through what could have been too heavy a read for the audience. I think she hit the right balance and will personally carry many of the book’s lessons with me as I seek to challenge my own hidden prejudices that I wish to bring to light and purge.

    (A copy of this book was generously provided to me from Viking through Goodreads Giveaways)

  • Christy

    So honest confessions...I did not read this book fully. It was late at the library and I had to skip a few chapters! But I did read a lot of the book including the ending. ;)

    I think part of this decision comes from a comment on the book - there is a good deal of repetitive ideas throughout. The same studies are presented in different chapters in a way that makes you feel that the author wrote the chapters separately and didn't add a "I know I already mentioned this" type of qualifier. I also wa

    So honest confessions...I did not read this book fully. It was late at the library and I had to skip a few chapters! But I did read a lot of the book including the ending. ;)

    I think part of this decision comes from a comment on the book - there is a good deal of repetitive ideas throughout. The same studies are presented in different chapters in a way that makes you feel that the author wrote the chapters separately and didn't add a "I know I already mentioned this" type of qualifier. I also was a little disappointed in the ending. I thought there would be more ideas toward solutions or for progress. She does give an emotional compelling ending to the book. But it lacked the detailed summary of what she sees society and individuals can do to combat bias.

    I did learn a lot from what I read though! There is a lot of science to the way we see people and a lot of factors that come into play. It is good to realize these are features that can help us categorize and organize the circumstances, people, and experiences of our lives. But it is also a good reminder that we have to be reflective and honest as individuals so that we can call ourselves out on how history, societal forces, and the way we were brought up (even where we were brought up) may skew our perceptions and create prejudice even when we desire to be fair-minded individuals. Change starts with individuals - with me. With each of us. There is no quick fix. The problems are deep and multi-faceted but if we are willing we can rise to the challenge of "loving others as we love ourselves". We want to be judged on the things that matter. This book reminds me to ask myself how I can do that better for others.

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