Lost Acre

Lost Acre

Wynter is here . . .Geryon Wynter has returned to Rotherweird and has not only taken over the town but is busy destroying the countrysiders' life too. Can our small band of heroes find a way to outwit a genius whose master plan is five centuries in the making? Watch this space . . . ...

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Title:Lost Acre
Author:Andrew Caldecott
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Lost Acre Reviews

  • Paromjit

    Andrew Caldecott concludes his gloriously stellar Rotherweird fantasy series in superb style, however, there is no way you can read this as a standalone, you are going to have go back to the beginning to make sense of this addition. This is hugely imaginative, original and smart storytelling that picks up from the last book which saw the resurrection of the evil, sinister Geryon Wynter and which cost the lives of integral figures fighting against him, such as Fortemain and Hayman Salt. Wynter ar

    Andrew Caldecott concludes his gloriously stellar Rotherweird fantasy series in superb style, however, there is no way you can read this as a standalone, you are going to have go back to the beginning to make sense of this addition. This is hugely imaginative, original and smart storytelling that picks up from the last book which saw the resurrection of the evil, sinister Geryon Wynter and which cost the lives of integral figures fighting against him, such as Fortemain and Hayman Salt. Wynter arrives with a plot and agenda that been 5 centuries in the making to Rotherweird, a place where history is banned, and where the election for mayor ended in failure. A stranger to most, he begins to take over, posing as a mystic, the protector and hero, saving the people from monsters, all foretold by prophecies drawn on ancient coins. He knows all that his assistant Bole knew, ostensibly honours the old Eleusians and their descendents, but what are his nefarious plans?

    Caldecott's world building is exquisite, complex and richly detailed in a narrative in which we see Wynter implacably mow down all opposition as he is installed in the now deceased Sir Veronal Slickstone's Manor as the new mayor. He takes advantage of the fear generated by monsters and the deaths of prominent residents to build a heavy and strong defence force, recruiting spies to carry out surveillance to identify all who oppose him with the intention of eliminating them. He lures the likes of born torturer, Carcasey Jack, to his side with money, aided by the likes of his loyal servants, Estella Scry, and Nona who smooth his way to gaining a stranglehold on the town. Wynter proves himself to be a different man from Slickstone who venerated exclusivity, Wynter exudes charm and his intent is to be inclusive, everyone is invited to his Unrecognisable party. In a narrative that is interspersed with Old History, the rebels that include historian Jonah Oblong, the feisty Vixen Valourhand, Tyke, and others work together and individually to do all that they can stand up against Wynter. Will they succeed?

    This is not a fantasy and science fiction read to rush through, but to savour, besides which it demands the full attention of the reader with all the intricate and complicated details, not to mention the fact that there is a huge cast of characters to keep up with. I cannot imagine how much time and effort Caldecott put into planning and writing this superior trilogy, but I think it must have taken over his entire life for years. I for one totally appreciated this, I have loved and adored this series, the eccentric characters and their development. However, it will not be for every reader, although if you enjoyed Gormenghast and its ilk, then this is a series that is likely to appeal to you. Highly recommended! Many thanks to Quercus and Jo Fletcher Books for a ARC.

  • Annarella

    The last book in a series is often the one that you're looking forward and the one that will not met you expectations.

    This means that I had high expectations for Last Acre and was afraid to be disappointed.

    I was wrong, the magic of this series worked again and I think this is the best one in this series.

    Mr Caldecott style of writing always works a sort of magic that keeps you hooked and turning pages even when you're feeling overwhelmed and overloaded by beauty and the high numbers of characters

    The last book in a series is often the one that you're looking forward and the one that will not met you expectations.

    This means that I had high expectations for Last Acre and was afraid to be disappointed.

    I was wrong, the magic of this series worked again and I think this is the best one in this series.

    Mr Caldecott style of writing always works a sort of magic that keeps you hooked and turning pages even when you're feeling overwhelmed and overloaded by beauty and the high numbers of characters.

    You cannot put it down and you cannot read too fast because it's a kind of beauty you have to enjoy slowly.

    This book, as the other in the series, is complex, multilayered and well developed.

    There's a lot going on and all the pieces will fall into place in a fast paced and amazing end.

    As usual the lines between good and bad guys is a bit blurred, this is not one of those fantasy books where there's a quest and the good guys are so good and the bad ones so bad.

    The cast of characters is well written and there's a lot of character development.

    The amazing style of writing and the humour are amongst the things that made me love this series.

    It's a great reading experience, I'm sad to leave Rotherweird and curious about what will be next.

    Please not that there is no way to read this book as a standalone.

    Highly recommended.

    Many thanks to the Quercus Books and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  • Leonie Byrne

    Thank you to Netgalley, Quercus Books and Andrew Caldecott for my arc of Lost Acre in exchange for an honest review.

    Spoiler warning, as this is the third book in the series this review will inevitably contain spoilers for books 1 & 2.

    Synopsis: Geryon Wynter has returned to Rotherweird and it's time to pick a side. Some of the townsfolk are drawn to his power and charisma, others remember the foul deeds he has done and reject him. But Wynter's on a mission, not only has he taken over the to

    Thank you to Netgalley, Quercus Books and Andrew Caldecott for my arc of Lost Acre in exchange for an honest review.

    Spoiler warning, as this is the third book in the series this review will inevitably contain spoilers for books 1 & 2.

    Synopsis: Geryon Wynter has returned to Rotherweird and it's time to pick a side. Some of the townsfolk are drawn to his power and charisma, others remember the foul deeds he has done and reject him. But Wynter's on a mission, not only has he taken over the town, he's determined to ruin the lives of the countrysider's too. With a master plan 500 years in the making can the town's heroes save the day?

    The Rotherweird series is definitely a marmite series. I've found that people either love it or hate it. It's complex, intriguing and you have to pay attention to what's going on. For me I've loved it! I found Wyntertide the most difficult of the three but I've definitely loved the series as a whole. There is a large cast of characters with very similar names so it can get confusing in part but for me this just adds to the wonderful complexity of the series. It's definitely ambitious but it does work! It's very original and nothing like I've seen before.

  • Michael Cattigan

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    Lost Acre, Andrew Caldecott

    Posted by THE BOOK LOVER'S SANCTUARY onJUL 16, 2019

    This is a deliciously quirky trilogy of novels! Many many things in the books, Rotherwe

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    Lost Acre, Andrew Caldecott

    Posted by THE BOOK LOVER'S SANCTUARY onJUL 16, 2019

    This is a deliciously quirky trilogy of novels! Many many things in the books, Rotherweirdand Wyntertyde should not work, and yet they somehow do.

    Gosh! Wyntertyde had left us on a cliffhanger: a second mixing point was discovered; Bolitho was revealed as Fortemain and then dispatched; the vile Calx Bole had succeeded in resurrecting his master, Geryon Wynter, after five hundred years dead.

    We return in this, the third and final book in the series, to the secluded and very British valley town of Rotherweird, cut off from the rest of England and its own history by a series of legal and historical precedents. A seclusion build on hidden secrets which the series has already generally revealed: Elizabethan child prodigies (note how I avoid the challenge of pluralising the word “genius”!) known as the Eleusians; Lost Acre, the other place, a mysterious alternate universe of wild and hybrid creatures and the ‘mixing point’ in which chimera and monsters can be created of animal and people and apparently eternal life granted; the sinister mystic, scientist, megalomaniac, monomaniac Geryon Wynter, reincarnated and returned at the conclusion of Wyntertyde through the service and sacrifice of his shape shifting colleague and Calx Bole.

    Wynter’s renaissance somewhat eclipses the chaos of the election of mayor in the previous book and he slowly ingratiates himself into society, prominence and power. Some of our main point of view characters start to question the narrative which places Wynter in the villain’s mantle. Has he been misunderstood? Misrepresented?

    Ranged against Wynter and his army of apothecaries and followers are a ragtag ensemble: Jonah Oblong, a gangly and socially awkward historian and outsider who struggled to find a niche in Rotherweird for two books and doesn’t seem to have much more success in this one; Gorhambury, the fastidious and particular town clerk; Vixen Valourhand, a scientist and somewhat rogue character vaulting around the rooftops of the town; Gregorius Jones, a PE Teacher whose role increases significantly in this novel; the mysterious Ferensen, previously Hieronymous Seer and his sister (and erstwhile spider-hybrid beast, now in recovery) and artist, Morval Seer; and Orelia Roc, local shopowner and mayoral candidate and the closest the series has to a hero. Maybe. And Tyke: immortal, enigmatic, innocent and Christ-like.

    None of the characters particularly take prominence and it is hard to identify a protagonist of any of them; and none of them feel terribly fleshed out and at least partially identifiable as tropes. This is no Stoker-esque band of light to set against the dark but a fractured and fractious group of individuals with separate agenda and only occasionally working together – and even then a little suspicious of each other. And they seem to do a lot of waiting. Perhaps “agency” is the word I’m striving for: very few of the characters possessed agency. Events happened to them, more often than not; they didn’t particularly work towards an end point. And as for the more secondary characters, I’m not entirely able, even after three novels, to separate some of them – Smiths and Strimmers and Snorkels. As a teacher, as a reviewer, I wantto describe them as thin or two-dimensional…. and yet I still ended up caring for them and liking them. Roc – possibly underused – and Oblong perhaps had the strongest journey; and thankfully the romantic subplot trope between them was avoided – although some love interests were a little clumsily shoe-horned into the final chapters.

    The central character in the novel and in the series, however, is the town of Rotherweird itself: Gothic and Dickensian and … Gormenghast-ly. Towering rickety buildings, dark alleyways, hidden catacombs, aerial walkways. Strange and arcane traditions which are both sinister and delightful. Town and country divisions and tensions strangely resonant with current politics.

    There is an intellectual and erudite mind behind these books: dare I say the mind of a geek and a puzzle enthusiast. Which is not unexpected as the author is also a barrister. Mythology is entwined through and redolent within the pages of the novel in a way reminiscent of a crossword. Central images of trees and the alternative reality of Lost Acre recalled the Garden of Eden and the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil, and explicitly Yggdrasil. Some characters consciously drew from myths: harpies and chimeras, Persephone. Christ. Nothing that required knowledge of the mythology to grasp, but enough that it sparked off those little connections – glints of light as other stories slide through the narrative warp and weft of this one.

    The writing is decent – albeit on occasion with slightly dizzying shifts in narrative points of view so that it can become a little confusing whose point of view you are being presented with. But I had a few gripes: description and atmosphere was at times sacrificed for plot and I personally would have liked to have spent more time in the eponymous Lost Acre.

    In short, a clever, quirky and enjoyable jaunt into a gothic mystery spanning the millenia between Roman invasions (Gregorius), the Elizabethans (Bole and Wynter, Ferensen and the Seers) and the modern day. The word that comes to mind in retrospect is perhaps charming…

    Disclaimer: I received a free ARC of the novel in exchange for an honest review. And apologies to Jo Fletcher, the publisher, that I did not get a review up earlier: as a teacher June and July are in the middle of exam marking period! Sorry!

    Ratings:

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    Publisher: Jo Fletcher Books

    Date: 25th July 2019

    Available: Amazon

    2019ARCCalx BoleEleusiansFerensenGeryon WynterGorhamburyGormenghastGothicGregorius JonesHieronymous SeerJesus ChristJonah OblongMorval SeerOrelia RocRotherweirdThe Garden of EdenThe Tree of Knowledge of Good and EvilTykeVixen Valourhandwyntertyde

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  • Mistress  #darklings

    Well, when coming to the end of a trilogy, sometimes the third book can be a bit sloppy/rushed. However...that’s not the case with this one. It’s written with the same attention to detail as the previous novels. It picks the thread up nicely and continues all the way to the end. I love fantasy fiction (it’s a particular favourite genre of mine), and this one ticks all my boxes. It’s interesting, well thought out & I love the city that’s been created with it.

    I’m sorry it’s now come to an end.

    Well, when coming to the end of a trilogy, sometimes the third book can be a bit sloppy/rushed. However...that’s not the case with this one. It’s written with the same attention to detail as the previous novels. It picks the thread up nicely and continues all the way to the end. I love fantasy fiction (it’s a particular favourite genre of mine), and this one ticks all my boxes. It’s interesting, well thought out & I love the city that’s been created with it.

    I’m sorry it’s now come to an end.

    The characters are fun and have developed nicely through each story. You can see that the author had really gotten into his stride with this one and I would love to see more from this author. I’m looking forward to his next project,

    Thank you to Netgalley, the author and the publisher for my arc.

    All thoughts and opinions are entirely my own.

    #LostAcre #Netgalley

  • Jess C

    Synopsis:

    Geryon Wynter is back, and he’s building up a loyal following. But what does this evil genius want now? Why has he returned and what’s his big plan? Despite his historical atrocities, some of the city’s inhabitants are happy to side with him – while the others must band together to stop him.

    The stakes are high: if Wynter isn’t stopped, it won’t just be the future of Rotherweird that comes under threat.

    Review:

    I can’t believe we’ve finally reached the final of the Rotherweird trilogy! The

    Synopsis:

    Geryon Wynter is back, and he’s building up a loyal following. But what does this evil genius want now? Why has he returned and what’s his big plan? Despite his historical atrocities, some of the city’s inhabitants are happy to side with him – while the others must band together to stop him.

    The stakes are high: if Wynter isn’t stopped, it won’t just be the future of Rotherweird that comes under threat.

    Review:

    I can’t believe we’ve finally reached the final of the Rotherweird trilogy! These novels are a masterpiece in world-building, and Lost Acre is no different

    As with the other two books, Lost Acre can be difficult to read at times. I’ve found that you really need to dedicate time and attention to get the most enjoyment from it. This isn’t necessarily a book you can pick up and put down for ten minutes at a time – you need to submerge yourself into this mysterious world and stay there for a couple of hours. Caldecott keeps you on your toes right until the very end – and expect plenty of sharp twists and turns along the way.

    Both the characters and the world are three-dimensional and feel believably real. Caldecott’s attention to detail is unrivalled: he paints such a vivid picture in your mind that it’s impossible to forget this town and its inhabitants. From the history to the folklore to the geography, every single aspect of Rotherweird is plotted out and shown to the reader. It’s one of the few fantasy worlds that I often find myself thinking about in quite random situations – every now and again, the concept will pop into my head.

    Out of the three books, Lost Acre is the one that stands out. To say this series finishes on a high is an understatement: the characters become even more developed, the plot is dark, witty and unpredictable, and Caldecott’s writing is superb.

    Lost Acre wraps up this ambitious piece of work in the way it truly deserves. I’d advise barring yourself away from the real world and losing yourself in this intricate story.

    Thanks to Netgalley, Quercus Books, Jo Fletcher Books and Andrew Caldecott for my ARC of Lost Acre in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

  • Karina

    This is the third instalment of the Rotherweird trilogy. Evil is back in Rotherweird and it has a name, Gervon Wynter. As is seen all over this planet, some are charmed by this power and support his masterplan although not many of them have a clear view what this plan exactly represents. And then there is the Resistance,ordinary, well perhaps not so ordinary, townspeople and country people. Of course the weird city of Rotherweird, an Elizabethan anachronism, plays a major role in this story as d

    This is the third instalment of the Rotherweird trilogy. Evil is back in Rotherweird and it has a name, Gervon Wynter. As is seen all over this planet, some are charmed by this power and support his masterplan although not many of them have a clear view what this plan exactly represents. And then there is the Resistance,ordinary, well perhaps not so ordinary, townspeople and country people. Of course the weird city of Rotherweird, an Elizabethan anachronism, plays a major role in this story as do many major and minor characters. Still one of the best characters in these stories is the city of Rotherweird. It is slightly gothic,Dickensian, there is a touch of horror in it ,but it is foremost absolutely captivating. This world building ,although complex,is done with great skill and is one(of the many)attractive features. As this is the third part of the trilogy it is fair to warn the readers that this is definitely not a standalone novel. If you have not been introduced to Rotherweird and its quirkiness, nor to some history or characters it is really unreadable. And as with all trilogies, especially fantasy,you are either completely mesmerized by it or you absolutely hate it! Well,I was very happy that I read it as it gave me many hours of sometimes confusing,sometimes marvelous and very often amazing pleasure.

  • Andover Library

    The third and final book in the intricate and lyrical Rotherweird Trilogy plunges us right back into the action following the disastrous mayoral election and return of Wynter that we left in Wyntertide. Identities are untangled, alliances are made and Lost Acre yet again seems to be under threat…

    Andrew Caldecott’s hidden town of Rotherweird and it’s otherworldly counterpart Lost Acre are just as fascinating as ever. This outing cemented some favourite characters for me among the diverse and some

    The third and final book in the intricate and lyrical Rotherweird Trilogy plunges us right back into the action following the disastrous mayoral election and return of Wynter that we left in Wyntertide. Identities are untangled, alliances are made and Lost Acre yet again seems to be under threat…

    Andrew Caldecott’s hidden town of Rotherweird and it’s otherworldly counterpart Lost Acre are just as fascinating as ever. This outing cemented some favourite characters for me among the diverse and sometimes confusing cast of primary players. Namely the headstrong and often prickly Valourhand and the ever put upon Gorhambury.

    Lost Acre, like it’s predecessors is a book to be savoured. Try rushing it and you won’t get the full submersive effect of being plunged into the quirky town.

    There are some lovely call backs to earlier in the series in this book, the coracle race, Oblongs tower chase, Green Man and the Hammer all recalled, adding to the general feeling of a wrapping up of the story.

    If you like your fantasy complex, this is a trilogy for you and Lost Acre rounds the trilogy off in style. If you haven’t read these yet, do start with the wonderful Rotherweird, this is definitely a series to read in order.

  • mylogicisfuzzy

    The Lost Acre brings Rotherweird trilogy to a close, starting straight after the mayoral election in Wyntertide (middle book) and the return of Geryon Wynter. Newcomers to the weird and wonderful town of Rotherweird should start with the first book since events and characters are closely connected.

    Wynter is back, gathering surviving Eleusians, plotting and attracting new followers. His opponents, dispersed among town and countryfolk following the Election Day are also slowly coming together as t

    The Lost Acre brings Rotherweird trilogy to a close, starting straight after the mayoral election in Wyntertide (middle book) and the return of Geryon Wynter. Newcomers to the weird and wonderful town of Rotherweird should start with the first book since events and characters are closely connected.

    Wynter is back, gathering surviving Eleusians, plotting and attracting new followers. His opponents, dispersed among town and countryfolk following the Election Day are also slowly coming together as they look for clues to Wynter’s ultimate goal in order to stop him. There are further riddles to unravel, new characters to meet and more prominence given to some of the side characters from Wyntertide. That’s pretty much all I’m going to say about the story as I don’t want to spoil it for anyone.

    What I really liked about The Lost Acre – and the whole trilogy is the intricate and imaginative world building, the history and mythology that made Rotherweird valley – the town, the countryside and their inhabitants so unique. Caldecott is great at writing big set piece scenes and there are several in this book which fans of the trilogy will love. What I didn’t enjoy so much and, I also had the same problem with the second book, is that while the ‘good guys’ all work towards the same goal, they continue to do so largely on their own. This got really frustrating at times. The characters are also fairly one dimensional and by now, I wish there was more development and complexity to them equalling the complexity of the storyline. Still, I think The Lost Acre is a better book and one I enjoyed more than Wyntertide. It’s a good conclusion to an original and highly imaginative trilogy.

    My thanks to Quercus Books, Jo Fletcher Books and Netgalley for the opportunity to read The Lost Acre.

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