Two Weeks

Two Weeks

Cole Blake, son of Landon and Ashley Baxter Blake, is months away from going off to college and taking the first steps towards his dream—a career in medicine. But as he starts his final semester of high school he meets Elise, a mysterious new girl who captures his attention—and heart—from day one.Elise has her heart set on mending her wild ways and rediscovering the good g...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Two Weeks
Author:Karen Kingsbury
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Two Weeks Reviews

  • Tracy

    Seriously crying ;)

  • Joy

    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    Karen Kingsbury is an author that does not sugar coat anything related to hardships and has a unique way of turning fictional characters into family members that we really feel like are our own.

    Elise has one goal in mind. NYU. She's a painter through and through and nothing is going to stop her from accomplishing her dream. That is, until she finds out that she's pregnant by her abusive ex-boyfriend. That's when her world crash

    I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

    Karen Kingsbury is an author that does not sugar coat anything related to hardships and has a unique way of turning fictional characters into family members that we really feel like are our own.

    Elise has one goal in mind. NYU. She's a painter through and through and nothing is going to stop her from accomplishing her dream. That is, until she finds out that she's pregnant by her abusive ex-boyfriend. That's when her world crashes and she's faced with a decision...let the baby live and raise it, let it be adopted out, or get an abortion.

    Cole has never felt anything like the way he feels for Elise. He sees her struggling with decisions and wants to help her. Even if it means giving up his own dream to marry her and raise another man's child. He's determined to stand by Elise no matter what she decides to do.

    Lucy and Aaron have unsuccessfully tried to adopt or get pregnant for ten years with no results and endless heartbreak. Aaron knows that God has timing and in due time, they will have a baby of their own. Lucy, however, finds her faith waning. 

    This is a very moving story of love, faith, and family. Heartwarming to the core and a great new addition to the Baxter series. If you've been a Baxter fan since the beginning or just picking up with them for the first time, I'm sure you will like this as much as I have.

    This book is appropriate for ages 16+ for mature content involving teenage sex (non-graphic) and teenage pregnancy. 

  • Susan

    Two Weeks

    Karen Kingsbury

    TWO WEEKS is the fifth book in the Baxter Family Series by Karen Kingsbury. It is the story of Cole Blake, Ashley Baxter's son and how he is anxiously waiting to leave home to attend college and peruse a career in medicine. In his final semester of high school, he meets Elise and his heart and mind thinks of nothing else but her! Elise comes with lots of trouble including the fact that she is pregnant by her abusive ex-boyfriend and she's not sure what she is going to do.

    Two Weeks

    Karen Kingsbury

    TWO WEEKS is the fifth book in the Baxter Family Series by Karen Kingsbury. It is the story of Cole Blake, Ashley Baxter's son and how he is anxiously waiting to leave home to attend college and peruse a career in medicine. In his final semester of high school, he meets Elise and his heart and mind thinks of nothing else but her! Elise comes with lots of trouble including the fact that she is pregnant by her abusive ex-boyfriend and she's not sure what she is going to do.

    Karen Kingsbury sure knows how to make the reader feel as if they are right there at the kitchen table with the family dealing with all their troubles and TWO WEEKS is exactly that! She made me sad, then the next moment I was smiling and giggling out loud! You can never go wrong with a Karen Kingsbury book if you are a fan of the Christian fiction genre. All of her characters feel genuine and relatable and put your emotions on one heck of a roller coaster ride. As you are reading, you will find yourself cheering for all of them, praying they can work out their problems and be happy once again. You will also wonder how much heartache a family can stand before it completely breaks down and splits.

    TWO WEEKS is a heart tugging story filled with grief, loneliness, heartbreak, and love that will hold you hostage until the very last page. Once I started this heartwarming story, it was very hard to put down! I really prayed that Cole would be able to convince Elise that she wasn't damaged and deserved to be loved and cherished. Karen Kingsbury isn't afraid to write about subjects out of the norm as far as the Christian Fiction genre goes. Oh, as a warning to the reader, keep the tissues handy and do not read the ending in a public place unless you don't mind crying in front of strangers! I'm so excited to continue catching up on all of Karen Kingsbury's previous books.

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from Atria Books through Netgalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  • Melissa

    I was starting to think that I was going to give up on Kingsbury's books. Other than To the Moon and Back, I have not really cared for the books in this series. This one was a bit better than the last one though!

    What I liked: Kingsbury truly knows how to capture emotion, especially when it comes to dealing with untimely death. The picture of God's faithfulness and care for those experiencing unimaginable pain is fantastic and will bring needed hope. The depiction of the "lasts" that everyone go

    I was starting to think that I was going to give up on Kingsbury's books. Other than To the Moon and Back, I have not really cared for the books in this series. This one was a bit better than the last one though!

    What I liked: Kingsbury truly knows how to capture emotion, especially when it comes to dealing with untimely death. The picture of God's faithfulness and care for those experiencing unimaginable pain is fantastic and will bring needed hope. The depiction of the "lasts" that everyone goes through when watching their children grow up is also very heartfelt and meaningful. I loved the three storylines and how they meshed together in the end. Beautiful. Finally, Cole's struggles to do the right thing after making a promise was realistic and a contrast to his otherwise "goody-goody" personality.

    What I didn't like: 1. The preachiness is over the top. Why mention Elise's aunt and uncle's drinking of a bottle of wine per night if not to get a dig in there against those who choose to drink? It had zero to do with the plot yet the author felt the need to put it in the the story as a "very bad thing" anyway.

    2. Cole's naivete and classification of Elise as a "good girl" because she sang Jesus Loves Me to a patient was sappy and made me almost want to stop reading.

    3. The mentions of Liberty University are SO frequent it almost reads like a commercial for the college. In fact, the author rarely if ever just uses the word college or phrase like "go away to college this fall," it is ALWAYS "go away to Liberty this fall."

    4. Finally, maybe it is the stage of life I'm in and the fact that I have kids who just went through college applications, acceptance, going away, etc., but all mentions of NYU and Elise absolutely grated and made me roll my eyes so much it hurt. NYU has a 19% acceptance rate. Even the kids with top resumes, top grades, top test scores, top recommendations, top extra-curriculars, etc. do not get in easily, if at all. Elise's admittance would not have come down to completing a few volunteer hours at a hospital to complete an admission checklist and wow, she's in. It is so incredibly unrealistic and actually made me knock the rating down an entire star. If you are going to use a real place in a story, do your research and make it authentic.

    As I've said before, I keep reading this series because I'm invested. Sometimes there's an awesome plot or part of the book that makes me remember why I like this series and keeps me coming back for more.

    I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  • Jennifer

    Two Weeks gets two stars for its two dimensional portrayal of a multifaceted issue. The novel centers around one question: If you’d been a senior in college when you got pregnant...what would you have done?” It presents a binary perspective setting up abortion as the evil beast versus pro-life as the valiant prince. It is a saccharine sweet Christian fiction fairy tale, in which the dialogue between characters consists of, “Every have one of those days? Where everything goes right?” “You know, b

    Two Weeks gets two stars for its two dimensional portrayal of a multifaceted issue. The novel centers around one question: If you’d been a senior in college when you got pregnant...what would you have done?” It presents a binary perspective setting up abortion as the evil beast versus pro-life as the valiant prince. It is a saccharine sweet Christian fiction fairy tale, in which the dialogue between characters consists of, “Every have one of those days? Where everything goes right?” “You know, baby, that’s what I love about you. You don’t know how to have a bad day.” Consistent with its genre, Two Weeks reinforces the fundamentalist misogynistic notion of female subordination, damsel in distress, incomplete and in need of a male savior, preferably in the form of a chaste husband.

    In this novel that character is 18 year old, high school senior Cole Baxter (Prince) on a quest to rescue damsel in distress Elise Walker (self-condemned bad girl determined to mend her “wild ways” and return to good girl status). Unfortunately, this modern day Belle is impregnated by a high school rebel (aka Beast). He had always pictured marrying a “good girl from a good family.” “He saw her pretty face and waves of hair, and how she looked like a Disney princess in need of a prince. A rescue. That could be him, right?...His dad had stepped in and saved the day for his mother...He and Elise could get married and he would be the father her tiny baby needed...And that was when another thought hit him...He not only liked Elise Walker. He loved her.”

    The distorted epiphany that equates love with “a rescue,” a legacy of men “stepping in and saving the day” for women, marriage and parenthood is disturbing. Is love not a reciprocal relationship between two equal partners? Are marriage and motherhood necessary to fulfill our identity as human beings and/or Christ followers? In her novel Two Weeks, Kingsbury underscores these assumptions as truths.

    Ironically, it is Cole’s mother, who interrogates these notions as unhealthy. “Ashley ignored Cole’s statement about Belle. She had heard him make the comparison more than once. How Elise looked like the Disney princess. It was true, Elise was beautiful. And yes, she favored the sweet girl who befriends a beast. But it wasn’t healthy for Cole to think this was some fantasy playing out around him.” However, she also blatantly condemns abortion, “The truth is that when a woman goes into an abortion clinic, there are two victims. One doesn’t come out. One does.” She encourages this high schooler with an unplanned pregnancy to keep the baby or if that doesn’t work out, “you could always place your child up for adoption.”

    In her adoption profile, Lucy was quoted saying “she would stop working if they had a baby. She believed in being a full-time mom – at least at first. Elise smiled. That meant the baby inside her would be loved.” Because of course women that work outside the home aren’t “full time moms.” Kingsbury equates staying at home with love and, by default, any type of career outside the kitchen as substandard. So sad, single and entrepreneurial women; motherhood is not for you. Two Weeks is the archetype for the Pharisaical laws the modern day Christian subculture imposes on new believers. These implied expectations of Christian religion cull away the square peg of our unique God given gifts and dynamic desires to fit the round mold of prescribed duty.

    Potential adoptive parent Lucy also communicates a judgmental, condescending, two dimensional perspective on heroin. “Lucy couldn’t fathom taking deadly drugs while pregnant....How could a woman feel her baby kicking inside her and then shoot up with heroin? As if the life and future of her child didn’t matter at all. The fact that the drug was going to cause the baby pain and harm and possible brain damage and death--of no concern to the mother...most pregnant users had probably lost the ability to make a decision for anyone but themselves. So sad. Lucy couldn’t fathom any of it.” And neither could the author. So sad.

    Perhaps the most reprehensible passage in all the book is when Kingsbury explains that Theo “worked the chains on the sidelines of every home game. His way of compensating for the fact that he’d never had a son to play the game.” Here she blatantly reinforces the misogynistic and outmoded concept of the desirability of a male children over females. Untenable.

    Christianity as I understand it offers a Prodigal Gospel. Biblical Christianity promotes not self-righteous and good works but redemption from sin. Biblical Christianity is not VIP only but an open invitation, “Invite some people who never get invited out, the misfits from the wrong side of the tracks. You’ll be—and experience—a blessing. They won’t be able to return the favor, but the favor will be returned—oh, how it will be returned!—at the resurrection of God’s people” (Luke 14:13-14).

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.