The Daughter's Tale

The Daughter's Tale

BERLIN, 1939. The dreams that Amanda Sternberg and her husband, Julius, had for their daughters are shattered when the Nazis descend on Berlin, burning down their beloved family bookshop and sending Julius to a concentration camp. Desperate to save her children, Amanda flees toward the south of France, where the widow of an old friend of her husband’s has agreed to take he...

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Title:The Daughter's Tale
Author:Armando Lucas Correa
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Daughter's Tale Reviews

  • Katie B

    I know it's only January but I have a feeling this could end up being my favorite historical fiction read of 2019. This book gripped me pretty darn near close to the start and didn't let up until the last page. I highly recommend this one even if you feel like you have read one too many WW2 historical fiction books. It's worth reading.

    Eighty year old Elise Duvall has been living in New York for the past seven decades when she receives quite a shock. A woman has contacted her and wants to deliver

    I know it's only January but I have a feeling this could end up being my favorite historical fiction read of 2019. This book gripped me pretty darn near close to the start and didn't let up until the last page. I highly recommend this one even if you feel like you have read one too many WW2 historical fiction books. It's worth reading.

    Eighty year old Elise Duvall has been living in New York for the past seven decades when she receives quite a shock. A woman has contacted her and wants to deliver letters written to Elise by her mother during World War 2. Time has a way of helping you forget your past but now all of it will come back to the surface for Elise along with so much she never even knew about.

    I like when historical fiction books are able to teach me something. In this case there were two things I didn't know about prior to reading. One was the tragic massacre of a village in France in 1944. Another thing that was part of the plot was the ship that left Germany with refugees bound for Cuba. The way both were weaved into the plot made for a compelling story and I am thankful the author chose to include them as it made me interested in looking up more information about both after I was done reading.

    Most people liked

    by Kristin Hannah and I think if you enjoyed that one you should definitely check this one out. While I thought that book was well-written it took me until almost the end before I felt a strong emotional connection to the characters. With this one it was so easy to immediately feel for the character of Amanda and your heart breaks with the choices she and other characters had to make not knowing how history would play out. One of the themes of the book is what you would be willing to do for someone you love and the different scenarios that played out have left me thinking about them still even though I finished the book days ago. I love when stories just stay with you in your head and that's why this was just a really good reading experience.

    I won a free advance copy of this book in a giveaway but was under no obligation to post a review. All views expressed are my honest opinion.

  • Tammy

    Multitudes of families were decimated or shattered by the holocaust. Based on a true story, this is a fictionalized account of one of them. We bear witness to a mother’s anguish and desperation as she tries to save her two daughters. Substitute families, in various forms, are constructed in order to survive and the outcome is nothing short of astonishingly miraculous. One of the most traumatic scenes occurs as the villagers of Oradour-Sur-Glane are savagely slaughtered and the town annihilated.

    Multitudes of families were decimated or shattered by the holocaust. Based on a true story, this is a fictionalized account of one of them. We bear witness to a mother’s anguish and desperation as she tries to save her two daughters. Substitute families, in various forms, are constructed in order to survive and the outcome is nothing short of astonishingly miraculous. One of the most traumatic scenes occurs as the villagers of Oradour-Sur-Glane are savagely slaughtered and the town annihilated. This is a story of sacrifice, betrayal, guilt, absolution and great love during one of the blackest periods of history.

  • Elyse Walters

    Amanda and Julius Sternberg were soon to be first time parents to a baby girl they would name Viera in 1933.

    They owned a book store in Charlottenberg, Germany. Amanda was supposed to get rid of all the books that were considered offensive, unpatriotic, or not sufficiently German. The intention was to eliminate all Jewishness from the printed universe.

    Julius had just started a new medical practice which was growing nicely.

    Amanda ran the bookshop.

    Bookshelves were piled high with Amanda brother’

    Amanda and Julius Sternberg were soon to be first time parents to a baby girl they would name Viera in 1933.

    They owned a book store in Charlottenberg, Germany. Amanda was supposed to get rid of all the books that were considered offensive, unpatriotic, or not sufficiently German. The intention was to eliminate all Jewishness from the printed universe.

    Julius had just started a new medical practice which was growing nicely.

    Amanda ran the bookshop.

    Bookshelves were piled high with Amanda brother’s books. He was a Russian poet but he had left Germany several years earlier for a Caribbean island.

    She also had many of her father’s storybooks that he had read to her when she was a child.

    She was trying to figure out which book she would save - only one. The others she was going to be burned.

    She decided to protect the French botanical album with its hand-painted illustrations of exotic plants and flowers that her father had given her.

    Getting rid of all the wonderful books felt like a mother casting her child into oblivion. Devastating!!

    “The era of extreme Jewish intellectualism has come to an end, and the German revolution has again opened their way for the true essence of being German”.

    National socialists were boasting the new era

    Frau Strasser was part of an army of women pretending to be soldiers. They never had actually been called to arms.....

    but Frau Strasser put the death of threat to Amanda - a last warning - she needed to burn all those books. Horrific bonfires of burning books were going up in flames around the city.

    Tears rolled down Amanda’s eyes as she began throwing books onto the floor preparing them for the worst.

    “Where they burn books, they will also end up burning people”.

    Being Jewish themselves - with friends in France - Amanda and Julius could secure a safe passage and leave everything behind starting new in Paris or some small town. However, Julius felt he could not abandon his cardiac patients.

    Viera was born in 1934 in Berlin.....born into a hostile world.

    Amanda had saved that botanical album and would often read to her baby in French or Latin.

    A year later, in 1935, another daughter, Lina, was born.

    Lina had the most prominent blue eyes with golden curls.

    Viera had reddish hair and honey-colored eyes.

    Julius was worried about Lina. She was tiny and weak. She had little interest in food.

    Lina was smart-as-a-whip though and seemed more mature than Viera.

    The city was in uproar. Things were getting worse. People rushing and bumping into each other.

    Frightening times.

    A Jewish synagogue went up in flames.

    Julius was nowhere to be found - was kicked out of his medical building.

    When Amanda was nervous-afraid - or worried she counted in silence.

    One..two..three..four..five..

    six—( she later taught her children this calming exercise).

    Eventually- Amanda learned the unspeakable - shocking truth.

    Julius was in Sachsenhausen: “a forced labor camp on the outskirts of Berlin. No one came back from Sachsenhausen.

    My heart continued to break as this story went on.

    Amanda received a beautiful letter from Julius. He could no longer walk.

    I wanted to cry ....

    This story is soooo intimate...

    Julius was in a dark cold place where you knew he was going to die - but the way he expressed his love to Amanda and their little girls - just wrecked me.

    The last thing Julius said to Amanda was:

    “My Amanda, I want you never to forget we were happy once. Your Julius”.

    The cruelties of war are impossible to fully climb out of. I’m always left with war is war is war ... HORRIFIC - i never understand it. It’s NEVER GOOD!!!

    Innocent people - German children - have been shunned by the whole world . Jews are still recovering.

    Generation after generation innocent people have been wiped clean.

    It’s just SAD!!!!

    I’m going to stop here as I don’t want to give any of the main specifics away of what happens as the story continues.

    .....You’ll meet 80-year-old Elise Duval in the year 2015.... and learn how she fits into this story. BASED ON TRUE EVENTS!!!

    Thank you to Goodreads friends, Katie and Tammy. When I read their wonderful reviews- I knew I wanted to read this.

    Thank you -to my reader- friends before me. I was inspired.

    Glad I didn’t miss this story. The ending was so deeply felt. The authors notes excellent too.

    Page turning! It’s easy to inhale this book in one or two sittings.

    Thank You Atria Books, Netgalley, and Armando Lucas Correa.

  • Brenda - Host of Traveling Sisters & Friends

    A mother’s heartbreak, impossible choices, desperate circumstances, and a daughter’s secrets to survival.

    The Daughter’s Tale is an unforgettable heartbreaking family saga that follows The German Girl. It explores the heart-wrenching decisions of one mother’s choices made out of love and for survival. The story pulled at my momma heartstrings and I could feel our main character’s Amanda’s desperation to save her daughters and her strength as she made the impossible, haunting decisions she had to

    A mother’s heartbreak, impossible choices, desperate circumstances, and a daughter’s secrets to survival.

    The Daughter’s Tale is an unforgettable heartbreaking family saga that follows The German Girl. It explores the heart-wrenching decisions of one mother’s choices made out of love and for survival. The story pulled at my momma heartstrings and I could feel our main character’s Amanda’s desperation to save her daughters and her strength as she made the impossible, haunting decisions she had to.

    Armando Lucas Correa does a good job here evoking the horrors here in the story but keeps the details lighter compared to some historical fiction I have read. It did lack some emotional pull and depth to some of the characters needed to connect on an emotional level. However, it did leave me a sobbing emotional mess in the best way in the end, thinking about all the mothers out there that had or have to make impossible decisions to save their children. For that, I highly recommend and I recommend to readers who like to keep the horror lighter but still get a feel for the events.

    I haven’t read The German Girl yet, however, I now need to read it and I look forward to the next book from Armando Lucas Correa

    Thank you to Simon and Schuster Canada for my complimentary copy.

  • Berit☀️✨

    𝔖𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔫𝔤𝔱𝔥. ℜ𝔢𝔰𝔦𝔩𝔦𝔢𝔫𝔠𝔢. ℌ𝔬𝔭𝔢.

    This was a compelling story about love, heartbreak, and sacrifice. No matter how many books I read about WWII I am always shocked by the horrors of war and The resilience of humans. Amanda was a happily married mother and the owner of her family bookshop. Then things begin to change. The books were ordered to be burned, her husband was sent away, and her daughters’ lives were in danger. Amanda’s one goal now is the survival of her daughters and she will sacrifice what

    𝔖𝔱𝔯𝔢𝔫𝔤𝔱𝔥. ℜ𝔢𝔰𝔦𝔩𝔦𝔢𝔫𝔠𝔢. ℌ𝔬𝔭𝔢.

    This was a compelling story about love, heartbreak, and sacrifice. No matter how many books I read about WWII I am always shocked by the horrors of war and The resilience of humans. Amanda was a happily married mother and the owner of her family bookshop. Then things begin to change. The books were ordered to be burned, her husband was sent away, and her daughters’ lives were in danger. Amanda’s one goal now is the survival of her daughters and she will sacrifice whatever it takes to ensure their safety. 80 years later Elise receives letters written by her mother all those decades ago. Letters that make her face secrets, some she has live with and some she never knew. Who are you really, when you’ve lived someone else’s nlife? This book wove some true events into the story. Including book burning, the annihilation of a French Village, and a boat of German refugees heading to Cuba. This is something I really love about historical fiction, you always learn something while reading.

    This book grab me from the first page. The writing was straightforward and concise, and I thought that was perfect for the subject matter. My heart broke for Amanda and I was humbled by her strength. The atrocities of war are so disturbing, so dark, so unfortunate. The bulk of the story was bleak but there was hope peppered throughout. Although I have to say as dark as most WWII books are I always find light in the strength of the characters.

    This was a well told story that read quicker than most historical fiction books. The characters were so compelling and I felt so much for them. This is a book that I think will appeal to most historical fiction fans.

    *** Big thanks to Atria for my copy of this book ***

  • Will Byrnes

    We all die at least once. But what must it be to experience what feels like the end multiple times? How much of who we are remains after each passing? Who do we become? What do we owe to the lives we’ve lived before?

    - image from his FB pages

    World War II and the outrages of the Nazis never seems to fade as a source of story-telling treasure. Armando Lucas Correa adds two factual period elements that are less than common knowledge to distinguish his story. The first is from a lane he has sailed before. In his 2016 international bestseller,

    , Correa followed a twelve-year-old Jewish girl fleeing Nazi Germany on the

    . The transoceanic passenger liner sailed on May 13, 1939 from Hamburg, bound for Havana, Cuba. There were 937 passengers aboard, almost all Jews fleeing Germany. Only a few would be allowed to disembark there. The ship became a cause célèbre, as it tried to find ports willing to accept its passengers. The United States refused to accept any. Some passengers were allowed to disembark in Great Britain, the Netherlands, Belgium and France. A large number of those who were returned to the continent died at the hands of the Nazis. That voyage is noted again in this book, although it does not occupy center stage. To reveal the other dark deed would be far too spoilerish, so I will leave it to those undaunted by such things to check it out here. For the rest of you, suffice it to say that it is a violent and unspeakable outrage against humanity, but one that is not widely known.

    - image and text from The Miami Herald

    These bleak events frame the story of a family desperately trying to survive, having waited too long to flee Germany. We meet Amanda Sternberg when she is pregnant with her first child, Viera, in 1934. Nazi forces are removing from bookstores books they consider offensive. Amanda’s bookstore is

    , and she is selecting which book or books she will save, if it comes to that. Her husband, Julius, is a cardiologist, with a thriving practice. It was doing so well, that he thought they might be unaffected by the changes taking place. Their second child is born in 1935. They stay put. In November, 1938, Krystallnacht sounds the final bell. It is too late. Amanda hopes to get her girls to safety with her brother in Cuba, and plans to that end. Things do not go quite to plan.

    The story is told through Amanda’s letters to her daughter, and through a daughter’s recollection of the trials of her early life. The tale was inspired when Correa met a particular Holocaust survivor.

    Correa lights our way through this dark passage with repeating motifs of hope and courage. Primary among these is botanical imagery. The letters that Amanda composes to her daughter are written on pages torn from a botanical album, offering a bit of color every time she writes, from a world in which even color seems to have been carted off to a grim end. Botany meets literacy in the naming of Amanda’s bookshop,

    , offering an Edenic fusion of the root of biological life with the good side of knowledge, and the terrors of having been driven out

    The girls’ father offers his daughters a tool for gaining control of themselves in difficult times, by blocking out all exteriors and counting the seconds between their heartbeats. It proves a useful aid in the trials ahead.

    I do have a couple of gripes about the book. Sadly, they are very spoilerish in nature, so, as with the second big picture awful thing noted above, I feel it necessary to tuck these under a spoiler label as well. If you have already read the book, dive in. The water’s fine. But if you have yet to read the book, I would skip on past these.

    Correa keeps our attention focused, as well, on the importance of naming. What we call ourselves, what others call us, and what we call them, all impact how, and whether we will find our way through to a complete life. And the notion of rootedness is, of course, major, in a tale of people driven from their homes. Where is

    when the obvious choice is no longer an option? How much of

    must be assigned to a place, and how much of it do we carry with us, like wandering tortoises?

    is a moving, if often sorrowful read. Lives threatened, begun, formed, and too often lost under the worst of circumstances. A heart wrenching tale of people struggling to survive. Some do. Choices are fraught in this story, as one would expect. Do this or that. Go here or there. Speak or remain silent. Pick this or that one. Stay or go. All choices have a cost. Thankfully, you will have only to choose whether to read or not. I would. The cost is minimal and the reward is significant.

    Review posted – May 3, 2019

    Publication date – May 7, 2019

    An ARE of this book was received from Atria, in return for an honest review. It was not translated from Spanish.

    =============================

    Correa’s main gig has been journalism, beginning in 1988, when he was still living in his native Cuba. After emigrating to the United States, he worked at the Spanish version of The Miami Herald from 1991, later moving to NYC in 1997 to work for People en Espanol Magazine. He has been editor in chief there since 2007. He lives in Manhattan with his partner and three children.

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    ----- For another article about the spoilered material in the review, check

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    -----by the author – People Magazine -

    -----The Miami Herald -

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  • Beverly

    The story revolves around two little known, real life events that took place during the Holocaust. It is a haunting and moving story and an enduring one. I can't imagine how children who survived lived with all the hatred they saw acted out everyday and that was aimed at them. Another theme besides basic survival is how do you rebuild your life after everyone you love is gone? I highly recommend this thoughtful and perceptive book.

  • Angela M

    Horrible things happened during WWII as we know. Books were burned. Jews arrested. Millions were killed. Children were separated from their parents sometimes initiated by mothers and fathers in efforts to save their children. In this story, based on true events, a small village is destroyed with almost no survivors. This novel reflects the strength of the people in the French resistance and tells the story of difficult decisions a mother makes to save her children. Memories are pushed back and a

    Horrible things happened during WWII as we know. Books were burned. Jews arrested. Millions were killed. Children were separated from their parents sometimes initiated by mothers and fathers in efforts to save their children. In this story, based on true events, a small village is destroyed with almost no survivors. This novel reflects the strength of the people in the French resistance and tells the story of difficult decisions a mother makes to save her children. Memories are pushed back and a life of secrets was led for decades by Elise Duval. I read a lot of WWII books and it seems there is always something to learn. In this case, it was the horrific fate of the people who lived in a small French village, Oradour-Sur-Glane. While it has its merits and is meaningful in that it based on real events, I have to judge this book against other WWII novels I have read. This is important and sad, but I can’t give it more than three stars. The writing style, flat and straight forward at times didn’t captivate me. There are several very positive reviews and I recommend you read those as well.

    This was an ongoing monthly read with my lovely book buddies Diane and Esil.

    An advanced copy of this book from was provided by Atria via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Susanne  Strong

    Amanda Sternberg is crushed when her husband is taken into custody by the Nazi’s. His fate is sealed. Amanda is left to care for her two children, Viera and Lina. Her husband left strict instructions for her to send them on a refugee ship (The St. Louis) to Havana. Amanda cannot bear the thought of losing both her girls. Viera is old enough to take care of herself, Lina is not, thus Amanda makes an impossible choice, sending Viera

    Amanda Sternberg is crushed when her husband is taken into custody by the Nazi’s. His fate is sealed. Amanda is left to care for her two children, Viera and Lina. Her husband left strict instructions for her to send them on a refugee ship (The St. Louis) to Havana. Amanda cannot bear the thought of losing both her girls. Viera is old enough to take care of herself, Lina is not, thus Amanda makes an impossible choice, sending Viera on her own to Cuba.

    Amanda and Lina are then taken by the Nazi’s into a Labor Camp, where Amanda endures and sacrifices for her daughter, until the day Lina can escape to a French Village. There, Lina, now known as Elise, learns what it means to survive, to exist, to persist and to love.

    “The Daughter’s Tale” is a novel that grapples with the relationship between mothers and daughters and sisters and the family you make in the most difficult of times. I had previously read Armando Lucas Correa’s “The German Girl” and loved it and while I liked “The Daughter’s Tale” I was not left with quite the same feeling after reading it. It lacked the same emotional bandwidth. Throughout the novel I desperately wanted to know more about little Viera’s story and unfortunately that story was never told and I felt that was a missed opportunity as Lina/Elise’s story didn’t captivate me. Armando Lucas Correa’s writing is however lyrical and lovely and I think this novel is to be enjoyed by lovers of historical fiction.

    Thank you to Mirtha Pena at Atria, NetGalley and Armando Lucas Correa for an ARC of this novel in exchange for an honest review.

    Published on NetGalley and Goodreads on 5.1.19.

    *Will be published on Amazon on 5.7.19.

  • Dorie  - Traveling Sister :)

    ***NOW AVAILABLE***

    I loved “The German Girl” by this author and was excited to read his new novel. From reading the blurb for this book I was hoping that there would be more and continued events and stories from people aboard the St. Louis. This is the ill fated ship that carried German Jewish families who had some funds hoping to land in Cuba. Unfortunately by the time the ship lands the Cuban officials refuse most of the passengers for political reasons and only a handful are allowed to disemb

    ***NOW AVAILABLE***

    I loved “The German Girl” by this author and was excited to read his new novel. From reading the blurb for this book I was hoping that there would be more and continued events and stories from people aboard the St. Louis. This is the ill fated ship that carried German Jewish families who had some funds hoping to land in Cuba. Unfortunately by the time the ship lands the Cuban officials refuse most of the passengers for political reasons and only a handful are allowed to disembark. This sent the rest to other countries that wouldn’t accept them and eventually back to Germany and for some concentration camps.

    The book starts with a phone call that an older woman Elise Duval receives from someone who had recently visited Cuba. A woman and her daughter visit Elise and bring with them an ebony box containing letters, photographs and more. It is such a shock that Elise collapses and has to be taken to the hospital.

    This book ultimately is a story of mothers and daughters and the difficult decisions that sometimes had to be made to protect their children. Some got sent away to live in another, safer country, some were sent to live in the French countryside which was felt to be safe. I thoroughly enjoyed these parts of the book and felt for the terrible decisions that people had to make.

    I read a lot of WWII books and unfortunately for me there wasn’t really anything new in this book that I hadn’t read about before, although I appreciate the extensive research the author must have done to write this novel and the fact that it's based on true facts.

    I already knew about the St. Louis from The German Girl and also had read another book about the terrible slaughter of women and children that was carried out in Oradour-Sur-Glane, by their own countrymen who were now following the Nazi’s and their rule of the country. Extremely immoral and unbelievable events.

    I think that this is a good book to read, particularly if you know nothing about the above mentioned events. I did think there were a few too many characters to keep track of and at times I found it a bit confusing. There isn’t much that takes us back to Elise in her older age, and I think that would have made it more interesting for me. It’s still a good book and I recommend it to lovers of historical fiction.

    I received a galley of this book through the publisher.

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