The Satapur Moonstone

The Satapur Moonstone

The highly anticipated follow-up to the critically acclaimed novel The Widows of Malabar Hill.India, 1922: It is rainy season in the lush, remote Sahyadri mountains, where the princely state of Satapur is tucked away. A curse seems to have fallen upon Satapur’s royal family, whose maharaja died of a sudden illness shortly before his teenage son was struck down in a tragic...

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Title:The Satapur Moonstone
Author:Sujata Massey
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Satapur Moonstone Reviews

  • etherealfire

    I won this ARC in a GoodReads Giveaway. The Satapur Moonstone marks the second adventure with the formidable, delightful paid female solicitor (and unpaid sleuth), Parveen Mistry. This second effort, like the first one features great storytelling, fascinating characters and a smart, courageous heroine worth investing in, leaving me wanting more.

    I can't wait to see where the next adventure takes us and I really hope a certain Colin Sandringham will be also be featured or at least hovering somewh

    I won this ARC in a GoodReads Giveaway. The Satapur Moonstone marks the second adventure with the formidable, delightful paid female solicitor (and unpaid sleuth), Parveen Mistry. This second effort, like the first one features great storytelling, fascinating characters and a smart, courageous heroine worth investing in, leaving me wanting more.

    I can't wait to see where the next adventure takes us and I really hope a certain Colin Sandringham will be also be featured or at least hovering somewhere in the periphery next time as well!

  • Kate

    I loved the first book and couldn't wait to join Perveen on another lawerly adventure. I listened to the audiobook once again (a little sad that they switched narrators as I liked the previous narrator a bit more, although I think the new narrator might appeal more to mature listeners... and by mature I mean even older than my almost 42 years).

    This time Perveen is off to a palace in Satapur, trying to decide the educational future of a young King to be, as his widowed mother and widowed grandmo

    I loved the first book and couldn't wait to join Perveen on another lawerly adventure. I listened to the audiobook once again (a little sad that they switched narrators as I liked the previous narrator a bit more, although I think the new narrator might appeal more to mature listeners... and by mature I mean even older than my almost 42 years).

    This time Perveen is off to a palace in Satapur, trying to decide the educational future of a young King to be, as his widowed mother and widowed grandmother are in disagreement. On her way to the remote location, Perveen meets the British agent Colin Sandringham. There is a slight hint of romance, which of course is hampered by ALL THE THINGS, but mostly because Perveen is still married

    .

    Because Perveen's job as a lawyer somehow brings her into constant danger from murder (I have to think that if lawyers had it as rough here in America as Perveen has in 1920s India, there'd be a lot less of them), there are lions and tigers and poisoners, oh my! But the book is also a glimpse into the world of India under British rule, the politics and all the many religions and customs, all told as part of the narrative so that you learn a lot while still being caught up in the mystery.

    You don't have to have read The Widows of Malabar Hill, although you should because it's awesome. It took me a little bit longer to get into this mystery than it did Malabar Hill, maybe because the first book also slowly reveal Perveen's past and I found that as compelling as the widows' mystery. And, I think, the new narrator threw me off a bit. Overall, especially with the introduction of Colin and a few great dogs, this book ended up as good as book one. I cannot wait for book 3!

  • Jamie Canaves

    Great Historical Mystery! (TW suicide)

    I love this historical mystery series and if you’re already a fan of Perveen from the first book I don’t see any reason why you wouldn’t also enjoy this one. The first half of the book does a great job of bringing the Satara mountains in India to life during 1922. You see not only Britain’s colonialism in India but also the caste system and the different religions. Massey does a really good job of showing a lot through Perveen’s travels and interactions as s

    Great Historical Mystery! (TW suicide)

    I love this historical mystery series and if you’re already a fan of Perveen from the first book I don’t see any reason why you wouldn’t also enjoy this one. The first half of the book does a great job of bringing the Satara mountains in India to life during 1922. You see not only Britain’s colonialism in India but also the caste system and the different religions. Massey does a really good job of showing a lot through Perveen’s travels and interactions as she takes on a job where she’ll have to intervene and decide where a future ruler will go to school until he’s old enough to lead. The mystery part starts once she’s at the kingdom of Satapur and discovers not everyone believes the royal family members’ deaths were accidental…and her own life seems to be in jeopardy. From there, the tension builds and builds into an explosive ending. I love that Perveen is smart and thoughtful and introspective and willing to fight for what she believes. This is a great series for historical mystery fans and a perfect introduction to mysteries for fans of historical fiction who have previously shied away from the crime genre.

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  • Rincey

    Probably a 3.5 that is closer to a 3, but it gets the bump up for being the book to get me out of my reading slump. Watch me talk about the book in my October wrap up:

  • Annet

    I loved, loved this 2nd book about woman lawyer Perveen Mistry, set in the princely state of Satapur, tucked away in the remote Sahyadri mountains. India, 1922. Wonderfully engaging story, although fictional, a lot to learn, about for example purdah, women living separate and not speaking to men. This book is about the Satapur's royal family, whose maharaja died of a sudden illness, as well as his teenage son, died in a tragic hunting accident. The royal ladies (grandmother and mother) are in di

    I loved, loved this 2nd book about woman lawyer Perveen Mistry, set in the princely state of Satapur, tucked away in the remote Sahyadri mountains. India, 1922. Wonderfully engaging story, although fictional, a lot to learn, about for example purdah, women living separate and not speaking to men. This book is about the Satapur's royal family, whose maharaja died of a sudden illness, as well as his teenage son, died in a tragic hunting accident. The royal ladies (grandmother and mother) are in dispute over the education of the young crown prince and a lawyer's counsel is required. So Perveen travels to Satapur and the story unfolds... 4.4, absolutely loved it, more to follow, and already looking forward to the next book. Would definitely recommend this book to my friends here!

    Here's the story: It is rainy season and Preveen travels to the princely state of Satapur as a curse seems to have fallen upon its Royal family, with the death of the maharaja and his son. The state is now ruled by an agent of the British Raj on behalf of the two maharanis, the dowager queen and her daughter. To solve their dispute over the education of the crown prince, Perveen travels to Satapur, determined to bring peace to the royal house and make a sound recommendation for the young prince's future. She arrives to find that the palace is full of cold-blooded power plays and ancient vendettas......

  • Lynn

    The first book The Widows of Malabar Hill was one of my best reads of 2018 so I was eager to read this second entry in the Perveen Mistry series. The time is 1922 and the location is India. Perveen is a female lawyer which is quite a feat for the times since women are treated as second class citizens without most rights. She, however, can not litigate in court room but deals mainly with women's issues where men can not have contact with women. She also does paper work in her father's law firm.

    Pe

    The first book The Widows of Malabar Hill was one of my best reads of 2018 so I was eager to read this second entry in the Perveen Mistry series. The time is 1922 and the location is India. Perveen is a female lawyer which is quite a feat for the times since women are treated as second class citizens without most rights. She, however, can not litigate in court room but deals mainly with women's issues where men can not have contact with women. She also does paper work in her father's law firm.

    Pereen is very bright and intuitive and knows how to handle delicate situations. She is going to places most women can not travel alone to. She travels to Satapur to resolve a problem between two maharanis who are in disagreement over the future education of a young prince who will reign over the area in about 10 years. There is hard travel through the jungle to arrive at the palaces-old and new. There is poisoning, suspected previous murders of rulers and intrigue. I think I enjoyed most the admirable character of Perveen and the information on customs, the food and clothing. There was information what life was like for the Indian people under the British rule during this time period. I am looking forward to the next book in the Perveen Mistry series.

  • Shomeret

    I received a free ARC of this book via the F2F mystery group that I attend. I will be passing on the ARC to another member of the group in preparation for the group's future discussion of the book.

    As I expected, this wasn't as interesting or intense as the first book. I'm not a fan of mysteries that center on royal courts. The sort of conflicts that arise are predictable. I still love Perveen as the protagonist. The British agent who was supervising her was also interesting. Yet the most surpris

    I received a free ARC of this book via the F2F mystery group that I attend. I will be passing on the ARC to another member of the group in preparation for the group's future discussion of the book.

    As I expected, this wasn't as interesting or intense as the first book. I'm not a fan of mysteries that center on royal courts. The sort of conflicts that arise are predictable. I still love Perveen as the protagonist. The British agent who was supervising her was also interesting. Yet the most surprising new characters were women-- particularly the Maharani Mirabai.

    I am hoping the next book has a different focus perhaps involving Gandhi's Quit India movement.

  • Tammy

    This is the second in the series and not quite as strong as the first. In the 1920’s the female Bombay lawyer, Perveen, is unable to argue in court and works as a solicitor for her father’s firm. She is hired as a counselor to determine the education of a crown prince which is in dispute between his mother and grandmother, the dowager queen. The men of the royal family have tragically died so an agent of the state now rules the province. Once again, the women are observing purdah and once again

    This is the second in the series and not quite as strong as the first. In the 1920’s the female Bombay lawyer, Perveen, is unable to argue in court and works as a solicitor for her father’s firm. She is hired as a counselor to determine the education of a crown prince which is in dispute between his mother and grandmother, the dowager queen. The men of the royal family have tragically died so an agent of the state now rules the province. Once again, the women are observing purdah and once again Perveen is the answer the problem but encounters a web of intrigue. In this installment Perveen has lost some of her chutzpah and I had hoped the story-line would have varied from the practice of purdah which occurred in the first of the series. Will I read the third? Possibly.

  • Jessica Woodbury

    I had hoped to come back to the Perveen Mistry books in print and enjoy myself more and happily I did. (I very much disliked the audiobook of the first novel.) I was pleased that the setting here moved to somewhere new and we got to see Perveen mostly on her own. Part of the pleasure of this kind of book is diving into a piece of history I don't know well, exploring a whole new set of customs and beliefs, and we get a very different world here than we did in the first book, looking at the Hindu

    I had hoped to come back to the Perveen Mistry books in print and enjoy myself more and happily I did. (I very much disliked the audiobook of the first novel.) I was pleased that the setting here moved to somewhere new and we got to see Perveen mostly on her own. Part of the pleasure of this kind of book is diving into a piece of history I don't know well, exploring a whole new set of customs and beliefs, and we get a very different world here than we did in the first book, looking at the Hindu ruling family of a princely state that is still under British control.

  • Melanie (Mel's Bookland Adventures)

    I think this was suffering slightly from second book syndrome. Shall definitely pick up book 3.

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