Gutten som elsket rådyr

Gutten som elsket rådyr

Det er jul. En eldre mann sitter i bilen sin på vei over fjellet. Han får plutselig øye på noe i mørket der fremme, og får med nød og neppe stoppet. I snødrevet foran ham står en liten gutt. Blå på leppene. Med et rådyrhorn på hodet. Fjorten år senere blir en ung jente funnet død i et fjellvann, ikke langt unna. Jenta er kledd som en ballettdanser. Ved bredden står et foto...

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Title:Gutten som elsket rådyr
Author:Samuel Bjørk
Rating:
Edition Language:Norwegian

Gutten som elsket rådyr Reviews

  • Susan

    This is the third in the series featuring Holger Munch and Mia Kruger. The first book was, “I’m Travelling Alone,” and the second was, “The Owl Always Hunts at Night.”

    I loved, “I’m Travelling Alone,” but was a little more reserved about its sequel, so I was interested to read this. For those familiar with the characters, there are still the same issues surrounding the main characters. Holger Munch is still, unrealistically, hoping to reunite with his wife and Mia Kruger is still obsessed with h

    This is the third in the series featuring Holger Munch and Mia Kruger. The first book was, “I’m Travelling Alone,” and the second was, “The Owl Always Hunts at Night.”

    I loved, “I’m Travelling Alone,” but was a little more reserved about its sequel, so I was interested to read this. For those familiar with the characters, there are still the same issues surrounding the main characters. Holger Munch is still, unrealistically, hoping to reunite with his wife and Mia Kruger is still obsessed with her dead twin sister. That aside, I did feel this was a much better read than the previous novel, with a strong serial killer story, alongside that involving the members of the team.

    The beginning of this novel really sets the atmosphere, as does the discovery of a body in a lake – a young ballet dancer, found still in her dance costume. As the body count grows, Holger Munch is dispirited by the involvement of outside agencies, and his lack of control in the investigation. The author really keeps the pace going with this novel and he manages to embrace all of the members of the unit, not just Munch and Kruger. I thought the writing was excellent - there were lots of clever touches and interesting characters, such as the rather annoying journalist, who you end up feeling sorry for, and I enjoyed Curry’s greater involvement in this book.

    Overall, I feel that the author has written a novel which is easily as good as his debut and, having got past that difficult, second novel, in a series, is back on top form. I look forward to reading more in this series and recommend this instalment in the series highly. I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley, for review.

  • Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Random House UK, Transworld Publishers for an advance copy of The Boy in the Headlights, the third novel to feature Norwegian detectives Holger Munch and Mia Krüger.

    When the body of a ballet dancer, in full costume, is found dead in a remote lake the special unit is reactivated. Munch and Krüger have hardly got going when more bodies are discovered. The team is stumped but gradually start to build a picture.

    I thoroughly enjoyed The Boy in the Headlights which

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Random House UK, Transworld Publishers for an advance copy of The Boy in the Headlights, the third novel to feature Norwegian detectives Holger Munch and Mia Krüger.

    When the body of a ballet dancer, in full costume, is found dead in a remote lake the special unit is reactivated. Munch and Krüger have hardly got going when more bodies are discovered. The team is stumped but gradually start to build a picture.

    I thoroughly enjoyed The Boy in the Headlights which is a slow burn of a read with an imaginative killer and some surprising twists and turns. The novel opens in 1990 with an old man driving home through remote countryside and finding a young boy with reindeer antlers tied to his head, the eponymous boy in the headlights. How he ties in to the rest of the plot only becomes clear later in the novel but it’s ingenious. The rest of the novel is set in the present, involving the hunt for a serial killer. I found it gripping and compulsive from the unusual killing method and investigative practices to the more mundane than you would guess motive through a series of well drawn vignettes of reactions to the investigation like the reporter and the general. It makes for a cohesive whole.

    I like the characters too who are very human and frail. Holger Munch whose life outside work revolves around his family and still hopes to get back with his ex wife even though she’s married to someone else. Hope or delusion? Whatever, his customary good sense evades him on that subject. Mia Krüger is a more complex character. A brilliant investigator given to flashes of genius who always moves the investigation on she is precarious mentally. Suicide and death are never far from her thoughts and she struggles with alcohol and prescription drug dependencies, longing to join her dead twin, Sigrid. There are, however, green shoots of survival in this novel. She has ditched the drink and drugs and her determination to get to the bottom of Sigrid’s death suggest a desire to move on. I found her ups and downs very relatable and have nothing but praise for her portrayal. It is moving and all too human.

    The Boy in the Headlights really hit the spot for me so I have no hesitation in recommending it as a great read.

  • Ceecee

    This was an easy 5 star rating for me as I loved the two previous books in the Holger Munch and Mia Kruger series which started with the outstanding ‘I’m Travelling Alone’ which was a real jaw thunker. Whilst my jaw didn’t hit the decks quite so many times it was still an absolutely amazing read. This was a bit like a symphony with either Mia or Holger taking the individual instrument parts in the action then the full ensemble comes together to reach a crescendo and the storyline rises and falls

    This was an easy 5 star rating for me as I loved the two previous books in the Holger Munch and Mia Kruger series which started with the outstanding ‘I’m Travelling Alone’ which was a real jaw thunker. Whilst my jaw didn’t hit the decks quite so many times it was still an absolutely amazing read. This was a bit like a symphony with either Mia or Holger taking the individual instrument parts in the action then the full ensemble comes together to reach a crescendo and the storyline rises and falls effortlessly. This was so cleverly written with twists , turns and misdirections and some incredibly powerful moments that made your eyes pop and your jaw drop. I don’t want to give much away but the plotting and pace was excellent from the first dramatic moments where car headlights caught the antler wearing young boy and couldn’t put this down.

    I really liked the characters- poor Holger remained in love with his ex wife although the new forensic pathologist Lillian Lund could become a distraction! Munch was struggling with guilt from the injuries his daughter suffered in book 2 - The Owl always hunts at night. Whilst Mia was still suffering many years on with the death of her twin sister Sigrid from a heroin overdose and this became relevant to this storyline. There was a serial killer who carefully posed his victims in a number of different ways and left a series of bizarre clues which challenged and taunted the brilliance of the unit led by Munch. Mia had to use all her analytical skills, insight and determination ably assisted by the likes of Gabriel Molk whilst Munch worked doggedly to unveil the killer. The storyline had so many intriguing elements to it including links to an Astrid Lindgren book ‘The Brothers Lionheart’ and to a case of arsonist Jon Ivar Salem which made Mia’s reputation. The story reached an exciting climax as yet again Mia was in danger. The book ultimately finished on an optimistic note for both of the lead characters.

    Overall, another terrific book from Samuel Bjork and an excellent translation too. Whilst this book can definitely be read as a stand-alone it helps to have read the previous two.

  • Venla

    Samuel Bjork's The Boy in the headlights is the third book in the Holger Munch & Mia Kruger series. It follows the foot steps of the previous books as a compelling psychological thriller. The main characters are still kind of the same, Much is still hoping to get back with his ex-wife and Mia is still thinking about her dead twin sister.

    Bjork's novels have always been precise and well-build so that the reader dives straight into a new place and time when the novel starts. The story begins w

    Samuel Bjork's The Boy in the headlights is the third book in the Holger Munch & Mia Kruger series. It follows the foot steps of the previous books as a compelling psychological thriller. The main characters are still kind of the same, Much is still hoping to get back with his ex-wife and Mia is still thinking about her dead twin sister.

    Bjork's novels have always been precise and well-build so that the reader dives straight into a new place and time when the novel starts. The story begins with a scene from 1999 where an old man is driving home when he sees a young boy in front of him on the empty road. Will that event be actually significant? Fourteen years later, a ballet dancer in full costume is found dead in a lake. Following couple of weeks are a disaster for everyone and the serial killer is still on the loose.

    The old murder investigation group is put back together and Oslo's police is facing hard time with these particular crimes. Investigators are dealing with their personal problems as well and Munch is not the only one whose life is going haywire. The Boy in the Headlights is a read that traps the readers completely into the story and refuses to let them go. Bjork is known for his skilful use of psychology in his novels and this is no exception. I really enjoyed this book and the whole series belongs to my favourites. I hope that Bjork will continue this at least with a few books and I'm super excited about the next book.

  • Laura Rash

    Another solid addition to this series. Fans of Nesbo and Jonasson will love these books.

  • Michelle

    The boy in the headlights is the third in the Munch and Kruger series. I have read the previous one so I was excited to receive a copy of this.

    A ballet dancer in full costume is found dead in a middle of lake in a remote area. There is no sign of a struggle. Munch and Kruger and assigned to the case and are troubled. How did she get there? They find a needle mark on her body. As the case goes on more bodies turn up, with similarities to the ballet dancer and the team know that they have a serial

    The boy in the headlights is the third in the Munch and Kruger series. I have read the previous one so I was excited to receive a copy of this.

    A ballet dancer in full costume is found dead in a middle of lake in a remote area. There is no sign of a struggle. Munch and Kruger and assigned to the case and are troubled. How did she get there? They find a needle mark on her body. As the case goes on more bodies turn up, with similarities to the ballet dancer and the team know that they have a serial killer on their hands.

    This story had a great start, like the previous two books. I was an easy, but gripping read. But there was so many characters and I got lost a bit. When we find out who the killer really was I was a bit disappointing. 3.5 stars from me.

  • Heidi

    One of my favourite things about Scandi crime is the atmospheric setting, which normally includes a bleak winter landscape. True to the genre, Bjork manages to set the stage of The Boy in the Headlights very quickly and immediately drew me into the chilling scene of a lonely, wintry country road, where an old man is driving through the night. Suddenly his headlights illuminate a creature he thinks is an animal crossing the road. But when he gets closer, he realises it’s a small boy running throu

    One of my favourite things about Scandi crime is the atmospheric setting, which normally includes a bleak winter landscape. True to the genre, Bjork manages to set the stage of The Boy in the Headlights very quickly and immediately drew me into the chilling scene of a lonely, wintry country road, where an old man is driving through the night. Suddenly his headlights illuminate a creature he thinks is an animal crossing the road. But when he gets closer, he realises it’s a small boy running through the night with deer antlers strapped to his head. My interest was immediately piqued, even though it wasn’t until the very end that this particular thread came full circle and I managed to slot the piece of the puzzle into its rightful place.

    The rest of the story follows more traditional guidelines of a Scandinavian murder mystery. There appears to be a serial killer on the loose, seemingly picking his victims at random and staging them in different locations in the Norwegian countryside. With no pattern or apparent motive to go on, this type of “thrill killer” is a detective’s worst nightmare. Investigative team Holger Munch and Mia Krüger, officers of the elite homicide squad, are pitching their brilliant minds against the devious plans of the murderer, racing against time to catch him before he can strike again – which will challenge even these two brilliant minds.

    When I started reading The Boy in the Headlights, I didn’t realise that it was the third in a series featuring the two main investigators Munch and Krüger, and I wished immediately that I had read the other two books first before tackling this one. Whilst it can easily be read as a stand-alone, both Munch and Krüger are complex and interesting characters with a rich backstory. Munch, whose daughter is still recovering from injuries sustained in an attack that was somehow related to one of his investigations, still harbours regrets about his involvement and his recent marriage breakdown. Krüger, who has lost a sister to a drug overdose, is also still struggling with her own personal demons. With a brilliant mind but also very highly strung and prone to anxiety and depression, Mia makes a very clever but also volatile investigator. Her impulsive nature often sends her off on different tangents not obvious to the clue-by-clue detective, and I found her thought processes fascinating.

    Bjork makes good use of all the elements that make Scandi crime so enjoyable for me: an atmospheric setting, a brutal and yet imaginative and clever killer and an investigative team whose own personal stories will leave you wanting to see them in many more books to come.

    I admit that the final reveal didn’t totally work for me, as I found aspects of it slightly baffling and far-fetched. I am wondering, however, if reading the earlier novels in the series would have filled in those gaps for me and am keen to start the series from the beginning to see what I have missed. All in all, I really enjoyed this original police procedural and think it will appeal to readers who like interesting, complex detectives that don’t quite fit the mould of your average investigator.

  • Kate~Bibliophile Book Club

    Having read and loved the first two books in this series, I was delighted to be able to read this one!

    We’re back with Holger and Mia in The Boy in the Headlights as they recover from the events of The Owl Always Hunts at Night. They each had a lot to deal with and are doing so in their own way.

    When a body is found at a mountain lake, they are called in to investigate. But as with all good crime novels, the body count inevitably rises. As Holger and Mia work to find out who is leaving them clues

    Having read and loved the first two books in this series, I was delighted to be able to read this one!

    We’re back with Holger and Mia in The Boy in the Headlights as they recover from the events of The Owl Always Hunts at Night. They each had a lot to deal with and are doing so in their own way.

    When a body is found at a mountain lake, they are called in to investigate. But as with all good crime novels, the body count inevitably rises. As Holger and Mia work to find out who is leaving them clues at each scene, they find themselves drawn in deeper into the killer’s game at every turn. What follows is a game of murderous cat and mouse that delves into their pasts while simultaneously threatening their future.

    I really like the pairing between these two detectives, it shouldn’t work, but it does. Both have their own flaws and foibles, but they know each other well enough to push past them and focus on the job at hand.

    The Boy in the Headlights is another excellent addition to the series. A gripping plot, dark characters and great writing make this a highly absorbing read.

    If you like your Scandi crime (as we all know, I LOVE it), this is a series you need to add to your TBR!

    Highly recommended!

  • Wendy

    I’ve been perched on the edge of my seat waiting for book three of the ‘Munch and Kruger’ series and was happy to find the usual intensity of the team dynamics are all present and correct, their personal dramas casting a shadow across any professional lines that have been drawn.

    I also relish the spontaneous scene changes that always keep me on my toes, as they drive the unpredictable plots to inevitable life-changing ends.

    Sadly, on this occasion, I failed to be 100% engaged by the usual erratic

    I’ve been perched on the edge of my seat waiting for book three of the ‘Munch and Kruger’ series and was happy to find the usual intensity of the team dynamics are all present and correct, their personal dramas casting a shadow across any professional lines that have been drawn.

    I also relish the spontaneous scene changes that always keep me on my toes, as they drive the unpredictable plots to inevitable life-changing ends.

    Sadly, on this occasion, I failed to be 100% engaged by the usual erratic delivery and couldn’t help but feel a spark of similarity to one of the previous investigations. So while the strength of our duo's company is without fault I struggled to connect to this story as a whole.

    may not be my favourite of the series, but I won’t quit reading further instalments based on this isolated experience. Probably best to try it for yourself, as the opinions appear to be mixed for this one.

  • Sjors

    I dont really get this book. Its so tense and weird. You hope that the ending will be awesome, but then it becomes lame and predictable. Liked the first two books better!

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