Screen Queens

Screen Queens

The Bold Type meets The Social Network when three girls vying for prestigious summer internships through a startup incubator program uncover the truth about what it means to succeed in the male-dominated world of tech.This summer Silicon Valley is a girls' club.Three thousand applicants. An acceptance rate of two percent. A dream internship for the winning team. ValleyStar...

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Title:Screen Queens
Author:Lori Goldstein
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Screen Queens Reviews

  • Jenn

    God, this book made me SO ANGRY but in the best way. I'm not even in tech, but reading this book still felt cathartic. I wish I'd had the opportunity to read it as a teen, back before I could relate to so very much of it. Screen Queens touches on so many issues of feminism without getting didactic and above and beyond all that, it's just a blast to read. Loved it.

  • JANELLE || WHATSHESEEES

    Huge thanks to BookSparks for sending me a free copy of Screen Queens along with some bookish swag for having me as an event Ambassador tomorrow (June 12th) @7pm at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, Ma - I'm super excited to be a part of it and meet the author along with two fellow Bookstagrammers who I'm meeting and doing the event with!!

    This book was a super fast read for me and took me about 2/3 days to finish.

    I also read this book as a buddy read with the other BookSharks that will be joinin

    Huge thanks to BookSparks for sending me a free copy of Screen Queens along with some bookish swag for having me as an event Ambassador tomorrow (June 12th) @7pm at Porter Square Books in Cambridge, Ma - I'm super excited to be a part of it and meet the author along with two fellow Bookstagrammers who I'm meeting and doing the event with!!

    This book was a super fast read for me and took me about 2/3 days to finish.

    I also read this book as a buddy read with the other BookSharks that will be joining me in the event.

    This book is about three girls who are smart as heck. They all are here for the same reason. To win a Pulse internship which will ultimately put them on the right track with their future careers.

    As this is the number one factor for them, they each become friends.

    While getting closer together as each day passes, during there five weeks where they have discovered something disturbing and not right with their mentor and leader who most practically worshiped, Ryan Thompson.

    As the girls easily discover that something isn't right within Ryan Thompson's company Pulse, they immediately abandon there App there supposed to present at the end of the five weeks in order to win the scholarship that is Pulse. That doesn't seem to matter anymore because what they plan to do now knowing what they do about Ryan Thompson and Pulse is going to be bigger than any Pulse internship they could have wanted/hoped for.

    Finally upon revealing the truths about Pulse and what Ryan Thompson has been hiding and faking for the past year or so. They turn to their mentor and fellow winner of ValleyStart Nishi who guides them in the way they needed. With ultimate girl power backing them up they created and came up with the concept Girls Empowered on such short notice to throw Ryan and the other teams off there game.

    And just when Ryan least expected it, Nishi introduces the next team to the stage and gives them the chance to explain their new up and reveal what has been discovered.

    In the end, they each walked away with something more than they came with.

    Whether it is friendship, a newfound perspective, or even love, they each made their time at ValleyStart worthwhile.

    This was a great Youth Adult novel with smart women who are on the brink of success and how they will let no one or anything come in there a way of success.

    And if you are a tech fanatic and think you're the only girl whos alone in that department, you are wrong. This book proves that and uplifts the impossibilities of future tech females to come.

  • Sara (A Gingerly Review)

    4.5 stars

    I had an idea of where this book was headed early on but still reading it shocked me. It pissed me off but in a good way (it'll make sense once you read the book!). If you don't walk away feeling empowered, you might be broken.

    FRTC

  • The Clever Reader

    Full 4.5 Star review is up on the blog!

  • Amanda

    This book was one that I picked up on complete impulse. I heard about the blog tour and signed up thinking that I may get the opportunity to read it, and lucky that I did, because this book was exactly what I needed. I don’t read a lot of contemporaries, but I really should because I almost always wind up enjoying them way more than anticipated. Screen Queens is such an important read for young adults and especially young

    This book was one that I picked up on complete impulse. I heard about the blog tour and signed up thinking that I may get the opportunity to read it, and lucky that I did, because this book was exactly what I needed. I don’t read a lot of contemporaries, but I really should because I almost always wind up enjoying them way more than anticipated. Screen Queens is such an important read for young adults and especially young women. This story is about girls who are in STEM, specifically, girls in computer science. It made me interested in coding and computer science, more important than that though, it highlighted the struggles of women in this male dominated field. Screen Queens was a fun read, but it was also a powerful one.

    Screen Queens was a young adult novel that I really felt represented teens well. The struggles of growing up and deciding what to do with th rest of your life were shown in three very different perspectives. Lucy, Delia and Maddie are each brilliant, empowered young women interested in computer science and Lori Goldstein does a great job of giving each of their perspectives a distinct voice and personality. The writing is light and flows at a great pace. This book pulled me out of a slump after reading some dense high fantasy. The idea of an app that rates people based on their populatiry on socal media combined with the novel’s light hearted pace really grabbed my attention.

    As a person who runs a blog and a bookstagram I could really relate to how likes and comments can start to feel like your worth as an online presence, so I really loved the idea of the Pulse app because I could see how something like that could turn sinister. While parts of this novel felt a little too political for me, I also felt like this was an incredibly important read. I loved that this book was about teenage girls interested in STEM because I don’t feel like there are many YA fiction books about women in science. I found myself even getting interested in coding because of the way it was presented.

    I really enjoyed this quick read and felt like it is an important book for young women. I loved the representation of women in STEM and felt like it was presented in such an interesting way, but felt like aspects of the book were overly political for my tastes. It was a fast paced read with good characters that will be empowering for young women. I would recommend this to young women or fans of the contemporary genre.

  • The Nerd Daily

    | Review by Nathalie DeFelice

    I love stories about the empowerment of women, especially in the tech world. Screen Queens will make readers quake with outrage at the injustice that women face everyday in the industry, and then turn that stereotype into fodder for change through three young women who’ve had enough. I laughed, I raged, and I ultimately loved this story. We get to see relationships challenged and change for the better, or at times, worse. More i

    | Review by Nathalie DeFelice

    I love stories about the empowerment of women, especially in the tech world. Screen Queens will make readers quake with outrage at the injustice that women face everyday in the industry, and then turn that stereotype into fodder for change through three young women who’ve had enough. I laughed, I raged, and I ultimately loved this story. We get to see relationships challenged and change for the better, or at times, worse. More importantly, we get to see women empower each other, not just tear away at themselves.

    At the crux of this story are Lucy, Maddie, and Delia. All three of these young women have just made it into ValleyStart, the tech program where they can jump start their dreams. For Lucy, it’s the opportunity of a lifetime, getting to rub elbows with the big-wigs in tech as a future CEO in training. Maddie sees it as the ultimate chance to bolster her design portfolio and nothing else, while Delia is ready to find out if she can make it in the tech world as a self-taught coder. As the competition begins, these girls realise how challenging the weeks ahead will be, adding on the fact that if they win…they’ll be the first female only team to win. Let’s also add a first love, a nemesis ex, and a two faced mentor and we’ve got a wild ride ahead.

    The story is told in three perspectives, which I quite liked, getting insight from Lucy, Maddie, and Delia really helped round out the story. More importantly, it helped distinguish their personalities, thoughts, and feelings. The character development in this story was really something. While I do love rooting for the main characters in the story, I will openly admit that I was a little underwhelmed with Lucy at the start. She comes off as superficial, fake, and ultimately only seeking to better her social status. I was disappointed, however, she does eventually grow on you. Not only that, but readers will begin to understand and see the motivations and drive behind her actions.

    Maddie is quite the opposite in terms of Lucy, she likes to keep to herself, and is not in any way interested in Lucy’s machinations until she gets to know her. She’s a tough nut with a squishy center. The relationship she has with her brother was sweet, and I loved that this also showed in her interactions with other kids her brother’s age. Delia is the shyest and youngest of the group, very timid and soft spoken. However, she’s got a back-bone of steel. One of my favourite scenes is toward the very beginning, where she stands up for herself in front of Lucy. It’s an assertion that she might be shy, but she will not let people bully or put her down.

    These girls are besieged by challenges of all kinds, but I think the most important one is how they’re treated by some of the men within this book. They are objectified, ridiculed, and their accomplishments minimised especially in comparison to men. It made their pushback so incredibly satisfying to read. It expressed the solidarity that women should have in the face of someone attempting to tear them down.

    Though the story did feel to start off a little slow, it definitely gained momentum and strength as I kept reading. I couldn’t put it down toward the end. There was a sweet romance as well that slowly builds, and felt satisfyingly quirky. There’s also a lot of humour to be found in this story, and I loved it, even when I got side-eyed at work while reading. That being said, at times there were moments where I felt there was a disconnect between certain characters, like we were potentially missing some important development in certain scenes. It isn’t enough to be really bothersome, but I think other readers might also find the same thing happening as they are reading.

    Ultimately, Screen Queens attempts to dismantle outdated ways of thinking; especially sexism and the attitudes of men towards women in the tech world. Though there are some minor things that I didn’t love, overall, it’s a great story. It’s an 8/10 for me. I encourage others to pick up and read this story, especially if you need a dose of women empowerment. It will also make an excellent summer read.

  • Larry H

    3.5 stars.

    So just to clear up any confusion if you're the type of person who occasionally picks up a book without reading what it's about and simply

    what it will be about based on the title, Lori Goldstein's new novel,

    , isn't about a bunch of actresses. (Hangs head sheepishly.)

    Lucy Katz, Maddie Li, and Delia Meyer are three of only four young women accepted into ValleyStart, one of the most exclusive high school technology incubator competitions in the country. Only two p

    3.5 stars.

    So just to clear up any confusion if you're the type of person who occasionally picks up a book without reading what it's about and simply

    what it will be about based on the title, Lori Goldstein's new novel,

    , isn't about a bunch of actresses. (Hangs head sheepishly.)

    Lucy Katz, Maddie Li, and Delia Meyer are three of only four young women accepted into ValleyStart, one of the most exclusive high school technology incubator competitions in the country. Only two percent of more than three thousand applicants are accepted, and the winning team is guaranteed a dream internship.

    Although they share some kick-ass technical and design skills, Lucy, Delia, and Maddie couldn't be more different. Lucy is the daughter of one of the most famous (and few) female leaders in the technology industry, although she'll be the first to say she's nothing like her mother. She's hoping that she'll be able to ride her team's victory into an acceptance at Stanford, and she'll flirt with whomever she needs to in order to make her dreams happen.

    Delia is shy and socially awkward, but she can code like nobody's business. Having grown up in a small Midwestern town, she taught herself to code on an out-of-date computer. She doesn't feel like she belongs among the children of privilege at ValleyStart, but she is determined to succeed, if for no other reason than to take the burden of supporting her off her parents.

    Maddie arrives from Boston with a chip on her shoulder. She doesn't care much about winning the competition, or making friends. She is only interested in how her participation in ValleyStart might have an impact on the growth of her graphic design business. She also has to deal with her parents' marriage imploding, and its effect on her and her younger brother.

    is a fun, heartfelt book about fighting for what you believe in and learning to stand up for yourself when all of the odds are stacked against you. It's the story of recognizing your strengths and your talents and not letting anyone tell you you're not worthy of success because you're a woman or a minority or because you don't come from a wealthy background. It's also a story about how sometimes you have to fight hard to make the truth known, and you can't be cowed into keeping quiet.

    While this book is fairly predictable in terms of plot, I really enjoyed reading it. It has a great message and would be a terrific read for young women or those who could use a bit of a confidence boost. It also was a fascinating (although unsurprising) look at the challenges faced by women in the tech world, and a salute to the early female pioneers in that field.

    I read the majority of this book on a plane (I seem to be doing that a lot lately) and thought Goldstein told a fun story. Sometimes when you're totally wrong about a book it still pays off in the end!

    See all of my reviews at

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    Check out my list of the best books I read in 2018 at

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  • Surbhi Das

    is a book which, deals with the disparity that exists between the male and female gender in the tech industry. Following the story of three young woman this book does a fantastic job in portraying the various circumstances and predicaments that women have to face in the tech industry or I suppose any industry that is male d

    is a book which, deals with the disparity that exists between the male and female gender in the tech industry. Following the story of three young woman this book does a fantastic job in portraying the various circumstances and predicaments that women have to face in the tech industry or I suppose any industry that is male dominant.

    The three main protagonists, Lucy, Maddie and Delia, all comes from different background with a different kind of upbringing but the three of them have one thing in common- their will to succeed in their respective fields. Therefore, when they are put in one team together in the country's most elite incubator program, ValleyStart and that too the only all-female team among the sea of men, the stakes are raised higher than they excepted. Now, Lucy, Maddie and Delia will have to give their absolute best if they want to win. But, the next five weeks of their lives are no bed of roses and as challenge upon challenge are thrown at their faces, the girls must learn to trust in their abilities and trust each other, not just for the sake of winning the competition and securing the internship but also, for the sake of empowering themselves against the men, who will stop at nothing to bring them down.

    This book has a very slow start and therefore, it took me a while before I could really get invested in the story and the lives of these three girls but at some 30% mark, the story picked up and I was hooked. I loved the setting and I think the author did a superb job in integrating both the positive and negative nature of the tech industry and Silicon Valley. This is a place where dreams come true for so many tech nerds but the question is at what cost? and especially, if that person is a woman.

    addresses relevant topics likes sexism, racism and the vices of social media. While social media definitely has its benefits, it can't be denied that somewhere it is also gnawing our society from within by having a huge cultural influence on its users, especially, the younger generations and this book does such a fabulous job in depicting just that.

    Apart from that,

    has a lot of diversity in both cultural and economical sense. Maddie is biracial and their is an American-Indian representation in the form of the girls mentor, Nishi Kapoor, with whom I fell in love with. At the heart of it all, this book is so much about female friendship, solidarity and empowerment. I loved the fact that even though, these girls had to face so many brutal challenges, both on professional and personal front, they never gave up, they improvised, they supported each other and they made a bang-on come back each time.

    Initially, I didn't really liked Lucy and Maddie but they eventually grew on me. I liked Delia best, she is such a sweetheart and I connected most with her but I can't deny that I admired Lucy's confidence and Maddie's perseverance. Both Lucy and Maddie never really had any friends and it was wonderful to read how they slowly discovered the power of women looking out for other women. The relationship among these girls evolved over time and turned into something really beautiful. At the end, I was glad that they remained together and showed the world the true meaning of "Girl Power".

    I did have a few timeline issues here and there and sometimes the writing felt a little uneven. In addition, the whole idea behind PULSE, strongly reminded me of an episode of Black Mirror,whose name I am unable to recall but other than that, I think,

    makes for a lovely summer read, what with ambitious young women, heart-warming friendships and lots and lots of female empowerment.

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  • Zev

    Two and a half stars. I liked the book's cover right away. I kept closing the book to admire it when I was trying to decide whether I should keep reading it. Sometimes, the cartoon-style covers are simplistic and yet communicate a lot in the way of small details, as did this one. I misunderstood what this book was about when I placed it on hold, but decided to give it a shot anyway when it came in at the library. It still kind of felt like false advertising. This is a story about three girls who

    Two and a half stars. I liked the book's cover right away. I kept closing the book to admire it when I was trying to decide whether I should keep reading it. Sometimes, the cartoon-style covers are simplistic and yet communicate a lot in the way of small details, as did this one. I misunderstood what this book was about when I placed it on hold, but decided to give it a shot anyway when it came in at the library. It still kind of felt like false advertising. This is a story about three girls who originally don't like each other, but are grouped together at a tech summer camp so they need to work together, both on their project and to take down a predator.

    The book jacket kind of made it sound like they would all be fast friends despite their differences and that the book would approach topics in a different way than the writing actually did. I didn't buy the girls' changes from enemies to friends, when I was reading this. I didn't find any of them likeable. I didn't care about who they missed and why, nor at things at stake for them. The writing just wasn't there for me. The characters...weren't naive. Naive isn't the right word. They were operating with the information given to them about life from people who had lived it in very specific ways. None of these girls set themselves up an Option B if this didn't work out, and readers got to see things fall apart for Lucy. I disliked Lucy perhaps the most. Portrayals don't exist in a vacuum, and the author went with ones I felt were really damaging. I got -why- she did it, though, and have been thinking a lot about it. I didn't like Lucy, but I was still really sad that Ryan did those things.

    Lots of mixed feelings over here on every aspect of the story. I wasn't the intended audience, but I lived the real-life version of this story. Went to the right school program, didn't pick an option B, landed a competitive internship (I was one of two people to get it for the seven-month period), worked hard. Everything pointed to me having a bright future and awesome career ahead of me. The actual result was that what few jobs I was able to land over the next five years always ended after four months, often much sooner and for stupid reasons. I live in a state where people can be fired for any reason or no reason at all. Pay is higher than minimum wage so that the employer doesn't have to pay your healthcare. I wish I were exaggerating. The day I read this book, I had just gotten fired after working at a place for five days. I wondered a lot while reading the book if my opinion would be different had I a more stable work history and a far less cynical and jaded outlook.

  • Greyson Richter | Use Your Words

    you had me at The Bold Type!!!!!

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