Killer in the Carriage House

Killer in the Carriage House

The second book in the Victorian Village Mystery series from New York Times bestselling author Sheila Connolly! After fifteen years away, Kate Hamilton never expected to end up back in her hometown of Asheboro, Maryland full time. And she definitely didn’t expect to be leading the charge of recreating the town as a Victorian village and tourist attraction. But as unexpect...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Killer in the Carriage House
Author:Sheila Connolly
Rating:

Killer in the Carriage House Reviews

  • Betty

    The second book of the Victorian Mysteries series is an outstanding history of the town of Asheboro, Maryland, it's library and Henry Barton's factory.

    Kate Hamilton is attempting to move ahead with the plans to turn Asheboro back to a VICTORIAN VILLAGE. She is finding it to be huge. She invites an expert, on manuscripts to catalog the paper in the Barton's Mansion. Plans to move the papers to the library are delayed as a body is found in the library just before the papers are to be delivered. N

    The second book of the Victorian Mysteries series is an outstanding history of the town of Asheboro, Maryland, it's library and Henry Barton's factory.

    Kate Hamilton is attempting to move ahead with the plans to turn Asheboro back to a VICTORIAN VILLAGE. She is finding it to be huge. She invites an expert, on manuscripts to catalog the paper in the Barton's Mansion. Plans to move the papers to the library are delayed as a body is found in the library just before the papers are to be delivered. Nowhere do they find the records for the factory. A Visit to the factory brings a huge surprise to light. What other secrets are to be found as Kate and historian Joshua explore the Mansion documents and Henry Barton's life.

    I HIGHLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK AND SERIES.

    Disclosure: Thanks to St. Martins Press for a copy through NetGalley. The opinions expressed are my own.

  • Barbara Rogers

    Series: Victorian Village Mysteries #2

    Publication Date: 7/9/19

    Number of Pages: 288

    I can hardly believe that this is only the second book in the series. The first book, Murder At The Mansion, did such a phenomenal job of setting up the characters and the backstory that you feel as if, in this book, you are coming home and visiting with old friends and places. The overarching background story concerns Asheboro, Maryland – a very small town that has gotten lost in the migration to larger cities. Th

    Series: Victorian Village Mysteries #2

    Publication Date: 7/9/19

    Number of Pages: 288

    I can hardly believe that this is only the second book in the series. The first book, Murder At The Mansion, did such a phenomenal job of setting up the characters and the backstory that you feel as if, in this book, you are coming home and visiting with old friends and places. The overarching background story concerns Asheboro, Maryland – a very small town that has gotten lost in the migration to larger cities. The only industry has closed down and the younger people are all moving to the larger cities for work. This leaves the town with few residents and no money to sustain itself. In a desperate, last-ditch effort to save the town, they are looking are re-making the town into a Victorian Village in the vein of colonial Williamsburg, VA.

    Kate Hamilton is busily trying to figure out how to convince the town merchants to rip out all of the modernization in their storefronts and change them back to their original Victorian configuration. Most of the changes from the last hundred years has been superficial and left the original structures intact. She also needs to find another tourist draw to the village and is hoping to find that in the remainder of the Henry Barton papers. In the last book, they found valuable and historic letters to Henry from Clara Barton, but that won’t be enough to draw tourists to their town. So, they are hoping that there will be additional historical documents of significance in Henry’s papers. Those things are very, very important because the town doesn’t have the money for any of the projects and if something of importance and value isn’t found, the town will just wither and die. So Kate has her hands full.

    As Kate, Josh and Carroll ready the documents from the Barton mansion to the town library, Kate has a young man drop in at the closed library asking to visit the family section of the library. Kate tells him that the library is temporarily closed because they don’t have a librarian and that he’ll have to ask permission from the town leaders before he can come in. The young man leaves and Kate soon locks up and leaves the library. When she returns the following day with her friend Carroll, it is to discover the body of the young man who had just visited the day before.

    Kate calls Detective Reynolds of the State Police and tells him what has happened. Nobody knows who the young man is – and his death wasn’t natural or accidental. Kate and company try to leave the murder investigation to Detective Reynolds while they focus on the documents – but – things keep happening that lead them to believe that the murder is somehow associated with the documents and they begin to wonder if there aren’t more documents stored somewhere else. What other secrets could there be? Is there something that would garner the town the money it needs to save itself? What was the young man looking for? Who could have killed him and why?

    This is a fun read with excellent mysteries – murder and other. I also liked the introduction of the historical and research information included because it made the scenarios very believable. All-in-all, it was a thoroughly enjoyable read and I can’t wait for the next book.

    I’ve read other series by the author and she seems to bring any romance elements into it very slowly – much to my dismay. I love a good mystery, but it also needs to have a good, strong romance element in it for me. So far, the romance in this series is tenuous and I’m getting antsy about it. Is Josh the one? The real, strong connection doesn’t seem to be there so far. Is it Ryan? Unlikely, but possible. Someone else? Who knows. I’m ready for it to be settled.

    I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  • Amy

    This second book in the Victorian Village series picks up Kate Hamilton's vision of bringing back prosperity to small-town Asheboro, Maryland--where she was born and raised. Putting her management skills to work after being downsized from a major hotel in Baltimore, she has made it her mission to find a way to revive her hometown. She hopes that Barton mansion will again provide an answer. But does the mysterious death of an intruder into the now-closed town's library have a connection to these

    This second book in the Victorian Village series picks up Kate Hamilton's vision of bringing back prosperity to small-town Asheboro, Maryland--where she was born and raised. Putting her management skills to work after being downsized from a major hotel in Baltimore, she has made it her mission to find a way to revive her hometown. She hopes that Barton mansion will again provide an answer. But does the mysterious death of an intruder into the now-closed town's library have a connection to these plans?

    The book can be read as a standalone, although it is helpful to read the first book to get a sense of the town,the significance of the Barton name, and his role in the community. As there are only a few characters, none of whom are particularly well-developed, there is a seemingly lack of a surprising suspect pool for most of the book. While the murder mystery unfortunately took a back seat until the very end, I really enjoyed the historical focus and what the potential was for the town. Kate's connection to her hometown deepens as she explores ways to develop her ideas, though some seem rather obvious, like meeting with the town's newspaper publisher and looking up articles relating to the relevant times. I wish there had been a little bit more romance between Kate and Josh but their seemingly casual relationship appears to be heading in a different direction at the conclusion of the book. I would definitely be interested in reading the next installment in this series.

    Thanks to NetGalley and Minotaur for an ARC of this book. My review is voluntary.

  • Kristina

    Killer in the Carriage House is the second book in A Victorian Village Mystery series. It can be read alone for those who are new to this series. Kate Hamilton lost her job when a big conglomerate took over the hotel where she worked. Her friend, Lisbeth Scott asks her to return to Asheboro and come up with a plan to save the dying town. Kate’s idea is to turn the town into a Victorian village after seeing the Henry Barton mansion. However, it will take a massive amount of planning, money and he

    Killer in the Carriage House is the second book in A Victorian Village Mystery series. It can be read alone for those who are new to this series. Kate Hamilton lost her job when a big conglomerate took over the hotel where she worked. Her friend, Lisbeth Scott asks her to return to Asheboro and come up with a plan to save the dying town. Kate’s idea is to turn the town into a Victorian village after seeing the Henry Barton mansion. However, it will take a massive amount of planning, money and help to pull it off. Money is something that is in short supply after the banker embezzled the town funds. Kate is hoping Henry Barton’s papers will be a help and gets assistance from Josh Wainwright and Carroll Peterson. I like that we are introduced to some of the townspeople like Mayor Skip Bentley, Frances who owns the newspaper, Ted the diner owner, and Mr. MacDonald with his hardware store. Killer in the Carriage House is a slow starter with a sluggish pace. I thought the mystery was light. The dead body is found after I was a quarter of the way through the book and is barely addressed after that point. Identifying the killer is a piece of cake and the resolution was lacking. Kate has great ideas for the town with no idea on how to execute them. She is also a procrastinator. Kate keeps putting off things she needs to accomplish (even going to the grocery store). She should be looking into funding, building codes, talking to towns people and doing research. Instead, Kate devotes her time to the Barton papers. Henry Barton does sound like a fascinating man and I am sure there is more to discover about him. I like the inclusion of Nell Pratt in the story from A Museum Mystery series. A Victorian Village Mystery series is a concept that I think is charming and I enjoyed Murder at the Mansion. Killer in the Carriage House, though, was lacking which is unusual for Sheila Connolly. I am curious to see what Kate and her friends uncover in the next A Victorian Village Mystery.

  • Lesa

    Although Kate Hamilton, the amateur sleuth in Killer in the Carriage House, comes across as distracted, I was wondering if the author, Sheila Connolly, was distracted when she wrote this latest mystery. I know I had an ARC, so I won't mention errors I found in the text. Those are acceptable in any ARC. But, the murder itself doesn't take center stage in this latest book. It almost seems like an afterthought, a body and murder easily forgotten.

    In Murder at the Mansion, Kate's best friend from hig

    Although Kate Hamilton, the amateur sleuth in Killer in the Carriage House, comes across as distracted, I was wondering if the author, Sheila Connolly, was distracted when she wrote this latest mystery. I know I had an ARC, so I won't mention errors I found in the text. Those are acceptable in any ARC. But, the murder itself doesn't take center stage in this latest book. It almost seems like an afterthought, a body and murder easily forgotten.

    In Murder at the Mansion, Kate's best friend from high school, Lisbeth Scott, begged her to return home to Asheboro, Maryland. The town is in decline, in desperate straits, and Lisbeth wants Kate's suggestions as to how to turn it around and make the small town thrive again. Kate suggests the townspeople and shop owners try to turn the central blocks into an authentic Victorian village, capitalizing on the Barton mansion on the outskirts. It's going to take money the town doesn't have, but Kate hopes there are documents that might help them find financial backers for the renovations.

    Kate is working with historian and professor Joshua Wainwright, who is an expert in 19th century industrialization. Together with a researcher, they drag documents from the Barton mansion, storing them in the closed public library. But, once they remove the boxes to the library, Kate is interrupted there by a young man who begs to use the library's resources. Kate's a little suspicious, and she tells him to talk to the people at the town hall. The next morning, Kate and the researcher, Carroll, find the young man's body in the library. It appears as if he broke in, but both women suspect murder.

    Let me preface the following remarks by saying I loved Murder at the Mansion and the concept of renovating an entire village. The first documents came as a surprise to me. At the point of the murder, though, this second book seems to go off course. Although there was a murder, everyone seems more interested in solving the mystery behind Henry Barton, owner of the town's shovel factory and the Barton mansion, than finding a killer. In fact, the murder seems minor, and there's little development of the victim, so the reader cares as little as the amateur sleuth does. The murder doesn't occur until one third of the book is over, and it seems incidental to the plot. The main plot is the need to develop Asheboro and find documents to support the renovation of the town.

    Kate Hamilton bumbles her way through the book, and through town meetings that open and close the story. She's not confident. She gets ahead of herself in the planning, and never does organize her plans. Although she has an academic and a researcher with her, she doesn't follow through with her own plans to do research. She over explains herself to others, telling them about her relationships, while trying to hide the documents. In fact, she comes across as someone who hasn't put a lot of thought into her next steps.

    I want to like this series. I want Asheboro to thrive. I love history, and the search for answers for this town. But, Killer in the Carriage House succeeds only for those of us who enjoy history. It won't succeed for readers who are interested in the murder mystery.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.