Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors

Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors

Award-winning author Sonali Dev launches a new series about the Rajes, an immigrant Indian family descended from royalty, who have built their lives in San Francisco...It is a truth universally acknowledged that only in an overachieving Indian American family can a genius daughter be considered a black sheep.Dr. Trisha Raje is San Francisco’s most acclaimed neurosurgeon. B...

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Title:Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors
Author:Sonali Dev
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors Reviews

  • peachygirl

    Now this is the kind of retelling that doesn't make me want to pull my hair out!

    I've read so many variations of P&P and never have I been this satisfied with one. Sonali Dev has successfully delivered an awesome, gender-swapped retelling of everyone's favourite love story, with exotic Indian flavours and beautifully believable characters.

    Dr.Trisha Raje, the proud and acclaimed Neurosurgeon, is the protagonist and is our female Mr.Darcy, trying to save the world, one brain at a time. Darcy J

    Now this is the kind of retelling that doesn't make me want to pull my hair out!

    I've read so many variations of P&P and never have I been this satisfied with one. Sonali Dev has successfully delivered an awesome, gender-swapped retelling of everyone's favourite love story, with exotic Indian flavours and beautifully believable characters.

    Dr.Trisha Raje, the proud and acclaimed Neurosurgeon, is the protagonist and is our female Mr.Darcy, trying to save the world, one brain at a time. Darcy James Caine aka DJ Caine, portrayed as the male Lizzy Bennet, is a hot chef with yummy biceps and yummier desserts, who becomes a victim of his own assumptions when he meets our royal Dr.Raje. Sparks fly, misunderstandings happen, drama ensues, truth prevails, sparks fly harder this time around and ignites a fire in the lovers' loins and yayy happy

    ummm ending. That's right. HAPPY ENDING.

    The one thing I loved the most about this book was, unlike most retellings that rely heavily on Austen's beloved classic, this book manages to retain its uniquity in sub-plots and character developments. Be it the hero's backstory, the marital woes of the heroine's sister, the animal farm analogy for her ambitious family, Wickham's wickedness, cultural background of the protagonists or the way racism and classism are dealt with, the author has managed to cultivate Austen's subtle satire and cleverly ingest her own idiosyncrasies to the mix, while offering a stupendous literary feast. What a lovely blend of fragrant flavours!

    A must read for P&P fans.

  • Obsidian

    Wow. What a wonderful retelling of Pride and Prejudice. Only the Mr. Darcy character is gender swapped and instead of being an upperclass nobleman, we have a young surgeon whose family is descended from Indian royalty (Trisha Raje) I initially didn't like that Dev had focused on the Mark Darcy character first, but I get why she did it. Eventually we get our Elizabeth Bennett (DJ Caine) and he was fantast

    Wow. What a wonderful retelling of Pride and Prejudice. Only the Mr. Darcy character is gender swapped and instead of being an upperclass nobleman, we have a young surgeon whose family is descended from Indian royalty (Trisha Raje) I initially didn't like that Dev had focused on the Mark Darcy character first, but I get why she did it. Eventually we get our Elizabeth Bennett (DJ Caine) and he was fantastic. Dev follows the same plot though modernizes it for readers. And she even takes a look at black live matters, feminism and rape culture that I was not expecting in this one. I maybe choked up a bit a few times. No spoilers, but I can say that I am excited to see if Dev follows Trisha's brother (Yash) in the next one. I really really want it. Cause, I am all about revenge, I wanted to knock the block off the Wickman character we get in this one. I was pretty much dream casting this book from beginning to end.

    "Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors" follows 30 something year old neurosurgeon, Trisha Raje. Though Trisha's family is pretty freaking spectacular, her mother is an ex-Bollywood performer, her father is descended from Indian royalty and is a doctor. Her older brother was Attorney General in California and is now running for governor. However, Trisha feels pushed out of her family. An incident occurred when she was 17 that affected her brother and caused a scandal that was hushed up. Trisha though finally decides she's tired of being on the outside of her family and wants to help her brother get elected. However, an old enemy rears her head again and Trisha deals with that, a secret her sister wants her to keep from everyone, and her growing feelings for chef DJ Caine.

    Trisha is a snob. Sorry, she is. I actually didn't like her at first. But heck, I wasn't a huge fan of Mark Darcy either until later in Pride and Prejudice. Trisha without realizing it talks down to people and has a way of being rude to DJ and acting as if cooking isn't a real job and that it makes him lower class. These two end up having a terrible foot in the mouth meet cute, and then again when DJ has a special reason to keep interacting with Trisha. Trisha though has a lot of heart. She's just afraid to show it. When we hear about the incident that occurred that caused Trisha to be labeled the "black sheep" I felt sorry for everyone involved. And when she has a heart to heart with her mother, I maybe teared up a bit. This was a strong story-line I wasn't expecting and Dev did an excellent job with it. We also of course get the Mark Darcy I am attracted to you scene in this one and it goes just as poorly in this book as it did in P&P. It doesn't help that this is after Trisha almost gets DJ shot by a cop (it's a long story) and I loved that DJ had to slap her down about her privilege of being a rich woman whose family is known and he is seen as nothing but a black man when law enforcement is around.

    DJ Caine is an up and coming chef. He left England after he realized that his younger sister needed his help. Now he's catering and hoping for a big break. His sister is all he has and DJ is worried that he won't be able to do what is needed for her. We do get a Wickman in this one, but won't get into that too much. It was a surprise and I liked how DJ interacted with Wickman and Trisha. Dev did a good job with DJ's backstory (actually English, though his father side is descended from Indian's too and his mother was a Rwandan refugee). I loved how DJ learned how to cook Indian food and how he modernized it up a bit too.

    The other characters are very developed in this one too. Loved Trisha's sister Nisha and her brother Yash. And wow, Yash's story-line. Once again, I hope the next book in this series follows him. I have some questions.

    Dev takes a very good look at the Desi culture in the United States and how Trisha's family remade itself. And I think it was great that she included in DJ's background and what he went through becoming a chef and how he still has to carry himself a certain way due to the fact that yes, he’s seen as a black man who can be killed if he breathes hard a certain way.

    I do wish that Dev had included the recipes of the food that DJ was cooking though. Seriously everything sounded delicious and I love Indian food. Don't read this book while hungry. Have a snack nearby.

    The flow was a bit uneven at first, but stick with it. I promise it gets better.

    The ending was a delight. I just wanted more.

  • Stacee

    Well, I’m a complete sucker for anything P+P and I was excited to see how a different take played out.

    Love love loved Trisha and DJ. She’s smart and maybe a bit awkward. He’s gruff and sort of a marshmallow. Together, she’s the Darcy and he’s the Elizabeth and I was all over their arguing. This entire set of characters is fantastic. I loved her crazy large family and his sister. The loyalty of the family their dynamic was refreshing to read.

    Plot wise it was new and comfortable at the same time

    Well, I’m a complete sucker for anything P+P and I was excited to see how a different take played out.

    Love love loved Trisha and DJ. She’s smart and maybe a bit awkward. He’s gruff and sort of a marshmallow. Together, she’s the Darcy and he’s the Elizabeth and I was all over their arguing. This entire set of characters is fantastic. I loved her crazy large family and his sister. The loyalty of the family their dynamic was refreshing to read.

    Plot wise it was new and comfortable at the same time and the descriptions of the food were mouth watering. Of course the slow burn story telling is so effective in a P+P story like this and the added conflict with Julia was a bonus I wasn’t expecting. I seriously loved every aspect.

    Overall, Sonali took a well known story and made it something that is entirely hers. I was captivated from the first page and I would love to read more from this family.

    **Huge thanks to William Morrow for providing the arc free of charge**

  • Lisa (Remarkablylisa)

    MY RATING: 5/5 STARS

    I received a copy from Harper Collins Canada in exchange for a honest review.

    BUT GUYS this might be my favourite read of 2019 so far. Okay, not my most favourite book of 2019 but Top 10 and it's pretty high up on the list. If you're a fan of retellings, then you need to read this one because instead of it being completely by the book, this is a fresh twist on Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. I'm not educated enough to tell you point by point differences but Sonali Dev play

    MY RATING: 5/5 STARS

    I received a copy from Harper Collins Canada in exchange for a honest review.

    BUT GUYS this might be my favourite read of 2019 so far. Okay, not my most favourite book of 2019 but Top 10 and it's pretty high up on the list. If you're a fan of retellings, then you need to read this one because instead of it being completely by the book, this is a fresh twist on Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. I'm not educated enough to tell you point by point differences but Sonali Dev played around with the characters from both the Bennet and Darcy family.

    I don't know how to go into this book without gushing over everything but you're going to hate Trisha or at least think something is wrong with her because she's emotionally unavailable and socially awkward. YESSSSSS. She is Darcy and she has good intentions for everything (a saint, really) but she's so freaking awkward, people think she's a jerk. When she's not. And then she doesn't understand what is going on to the point that there's a bunch of misunderstandings and she becomes the jerk people paint her to be. I'm not saying Trisha is perfect. She's not. She says some stuff that are unwarranted but I loved her a lot by the end of the book just like how readers love Darcy so hush. Don't hurt my baby.

    Anyways, Trisha is great because she strives to win the heart's of her family members after The Incident. The Incident has caused major grief and complications in her family as they dealt with a psycho stalker and her father basically hating Trisha for basically, allowing it to happen to her own brother. It was terribly angsty when the issue was resolved between Trisha and her father. It hit me in the fact when everyone's true emotions were revealed and I may had shed a few heart-warming tears. I just...cannot. Trisha, baby, you're doing great.

    Meanwhile, the cook, also known as Dj, cannot stand to lose his sister to brain cancer. Trisha knows a brilliant way to save his sister but shockingly to both of them, his sister doesn't want to do it because she'll lose her vision and what's the point of life as an artist if you can't see what you're doing? DJ has his own prejudice against Trisha. He sees her a rich brat who got everything handed to her. After all, her wealthy upbringing allowed to get the best of studies and also, the best connections for the best jobs. He also doesn't like her that much because well, Trisha called him the Help and usually when that happens, nobody likes you.

    Anyways, the psychopath comes back throughout the whole story and you're just waiting for her to get her punishment. When that moment comes, i'm kind of let down? In a way? Like it was like oh snap! Trisha really did that and defeated the beast but I wanted a legal battle. I wanted psychopath person to be in jail. To be removed from the country. Because I CANNOT STAND HER. I REALLY CANNOT. Sonali did a great job at writing a Wickham that made readers want to rip the pages out and eat them because you cannot possibly handle this character.

    MY RECOMMENDATION

    In conclusion, this book made me feel a lot of emotions. Good emotions. I teared up and cried a lot so yeah. Pick this bad boy up and dig into 400 plus pages of delicious writing.

  • Bookphenomena (Micky)

    Review is now live on the blog:

    This read was the most unusual Pride & Prejudice retelling I have encountered and where it shone was in the complexity of the plot and characters of the family, so true to the original. However, this is a authentic piece of fiction in it's own right, you recognise the foundation of Pride and Prejudice but the Rajes family are new and fresh for your perusal.

    Trisha Rajes was a savant-type neurosurgeon but she was also ever

    Review is now live on the blog:

    This read was the most unusual Pride & Prejudice retelling I have encountered and where it shone was in the complexity of the plot and characters of the family, so true to the original. However, this is a authentic piece of fiction in it's own right, you recognise the foundation of Pride and Prejudice but the Rajes family are new and fresh for your perusal.

    Trisha Rajes was a savant-type neurosurgeon but she was also everything socially awkward, quirky and sensitive in her non-professional life. I lost count of the times her dialogue and inner monologue made me laugh out loud. Believe it or not, although talented, Trisha was pretty insignificant in her family and she longed for closer ties with them.

    "Because it was a fact universally acknowledged that she was an approval slut when it came to her family."

    When Trisha met DJ (Darcy James), also known as 'Bicep-Chef' she was all clumsy tongue, arrogance, superiority and foot in mouth. This situation continued whenever they met and that was often. Trisha's connection to DJ was complex and emotive, there was a story with such heart in the background to this retelling. DJ was definitely the one with the quick quips and speedy rebuttals but really he was no better behaved than Trisha.

    "What was it about this woman that made him want to be a prick? Oh yeah, it was the fact that she was a callous snob and she made him feel like - what was the phrase? -ah, the hired help."

    The family element in this story is strong with lots of dysfunctional connections but bonds that desired more. Nisha and Yash were my favourites, with HRH my least favourite. There were short periods of description and back story that sometimes felt like I was pushing through but this story was so worth it.

    If you fancy a classic retelling that is out of the ordinary, then Sonali Dev will inspire you, make you laugh and generally entertain the heck out of you.

    I voluntarily read an early copy of this book, thank you Edelweiss and Harper Collins.

  • Jypsy

    Pride and Prejudice and Other Flavors is a modern retelling of the timeless classic. This version has a unique element. The woman, Trisha, is proud, and the man, DJ, is prejudice. I liked Trisha. She is proud because she's a surgeon, and that's a justifiable reason. She is an intelligent, strong and likeable character. DJ, on the other hand, I despised. At some point, I should have come to like him, like in the original, but that didn't happen. He's just unlikable and garners no sympathy. I unde

    Pride and Prejudice and Other Flavors is a modern retelling of the timeless classic. This version has a unique element. The woman, Trisha, is proud, and the man, DJ, is prejudice. I liked Trisha. She is proud because she's a surgeon, and that's a justifiable reason. She is an intelligent, strong and likeable character. DJ, on the other hand, I despised. At some point, I should have come to like him, like in the original, but that didn't happen. He's just unlikable and garners no sympathy. I understand that the differences between social classes is supposed to be sharply rendered, but prejudice is present in every class and every race. Much of it is due to extreme ignorance, lack of education and an unwillingness to admit or acknowledge that these attributes are present. I see all of this in DJ. His character soured what was otherwise an engaging story. Everything else is quirky and charming and it flows well. The culture is beautiful described, well written and immersive. The place and time have a true feeling of life about them. Overall, I'm just ignoring DJ because he's a drag who brings the review down to a two star,and I think it's better than that. Instead, I'm focusing on the merits of the story. It's a delightful and culturally rich retelling. For the positive attributes, the story is more of a four star. Thanks to NetGalley for an arc in exchange for an honest review.

  • WhiskeyintheJar/Kyraryker

    4.3 stars

    I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

    In this start to the Rajes series, Sonali Dev gives us an emotional look into a royal Indian family that migrated to America. The title gives a clue that Ms. Dev took inspiratio

    4.3 stars

    I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

    In this start to the Rajes series, Sonali Dev gives us an emotional look into a royal Indian family that migrated to America. The title gives a clue that Ms. Dev took inspiration from Jane Austen, Trisha is our arrogant still waters run deep Mr. Darcy while DJ is our making some snap judgments Elizabeth. There is also a villainous Wickham character, older sister (already married) worried about her beau wanting someone else, sick younger sister, mother pressuring children to get married, and other little takings that Pride and Prejudice readers will recognize. It's all inspired by and not based on and I loved how Dev put her spin on the tale.

    The beginning focuses on Trisha, a young brilliant brain surgeon, and the dynamics she has with her family. Her family is rather large but I never felt overwhelmed with characters, Dev is amazing at weaving sibling, parent, cousin, and grandparent relationships into the fabric of the story. We learn how Trisha feels like an outcast in her family because of how a friendship (Julia Wickham) ended up hurting her brother Yash, a US District Attorney gearing up to make a run at California Governor. I can't even put into words how Dev expertly touches on and relays all those complicated family feelings; you'll get sucked in believing the Rajes are a real family and probably personally connect with some of their issues.

    DJ comes into the story with the opposite of a meet-cute with Trisha, leaving him to believe she's an arrogant snob. He also turns out to be the older brother of Emma, a patient of Trisha's. Emma has a brain tumor that other doctors have said is inoperable, but Trisha has developed a way to remove it, however, it would leave Emma, an artist, blind. Emma wants to refuse the surgery and DJ is mad that Trisha won't heavily push her. They are forced to spend more time together when, because of his friendship with one of Trisha's cousins, leads to him catering for her brother Yash's campaign fundraiser. Further complicating matters is Trisha's past enemy, Julia, snaking around DJ and Emma.

    Trisha is harder to warm up to right away, she is a bit arrogant but Dev deftly draws out her character through showing how she grew up, the dynamics, her guilt, her love for her family, and the very essence of what makes Trisha such a brilliant surgeon. Her character is a master class in giving what people need from you while still staying true to your core and finding someone who understands and loves you because and despite it all. It takes a little longer to get to DJ but Dev gives him as much depth and breadth to his character as Trisha. His background, parent's situation, racial and class divisions, relationship with surrogate mother, and being responsible for Emma at a young age, breath life into his thoughts, feelings, actions, and motivations.

    The romance is all at once the background and motivation for the story, family dynamics steal the show often enough but without those dynamics driving the story, the romance would not flourish and feel as complete the way it does. Their relationship is very biting at first but as Dev peels back the layers on Trisha and Dev, it becomes clear how they are talking at cross purposes to each other and you begin to root for these two to clear up misunderstandings and give into what their hearts are trying to tell them.

    As I said earlier, there is no way to touch on all the characters and threads that make this such an enriching full story. I don't know if it is a term but this read like literary romance, Dev beautifully began a woven tapestry of the Raje family. I've called Dev a “lip quivering” author and while the emotions can be quite raw at times, there is always an underlining hopefulness to her writing that makes me believe that love will win in the end. I'm utterly invested in the Raje family and can't wait for the next in the series.

  • Sahitya

    Mostly a 3.5.

    I had read books by this author before, but long ago that I don’t remember much about them. However, when I read the synopsis for this one and realized it’s a desi retelling of P&P, I was just so happy. I also loved that this was set in US, because I can relate more to diaspora stories these days than those set completely in India. And this one both impressed and frustrated the hell out of me.

    Trisha is an accomplished neurosurgeon who takes immense pride in her job but is quite

    Mostly a 3.5.

    I had read books by this author before, but long ago that I don’t remember much about them. However, when I read the synopsis for this one and realized it’s a desi retelling of P&P, I was just so happy. I also loved that this was set in US, because I can relate more to diaspora stories these days than those set completely in India. And this one both impressed and frustrated the hell out of me.

    Trisha is an accomplished neurosurgeon who takes immense pride in her job but is quite socially inept. She also immensely loves her family, but has a lot of guilt for something that she did fifteen years ago which affected her brother Yash and soured her relationship with her father. She is compassionate and a problem solver and I loved her relationship with her sister and cousins and her grandmother. However, despite working hard to achieve her goals, she has been born to extreme privilege and it shows. She also frequently puts her foot in her mouth because she isn’t good at talking or expressing her feelings.

    DJ is a chef who has left everything he worked for and is almost bankrupt trying to save his sister suffering from a tumor in her brain. He feels almost spiritual about his cooking and takes immense pleasure in seeing people enjoy and appreciate his food. He has also suffered a lot in his life, bullied and tormented and left homeless by his own father’s family, so he feels very hurt when Trisha makes insensitive comments about him and doesn’t see his concerns in tricky situations because of her own privilege. That makes him retaliate with his own harsh words.

    Both these characters hurt each other a lot, both knowingly and unknowingly, argue all the time and even though I saw that they were attracted to each other, I didn’t completely feel invested in their relationship. I just wanted them to stop hating each other. Even though they both are good people, I think I wanted to be convinced that they could be great together too, which I didn’t get in the book. Their getting together felt too much like the end of P&P and I don’t think that translates well to a contemporary setting.

    The author does a good job bringing the Raje family to life. We get to know their history, how the kids have been brought up, their beliefs and values and I think it was all well done. The family is very close to each other and I think that reflected on the page. The author also shows that despite being good people and working towards the betterment of society, both personally and politically, they all are still creatures of privilege and can be tone deaf and insensitive to other’s issues. For all their talk about family loyalty, they are all very quick to judge Trisha for her choices and make her feel more guilty all the time and I didn’t like it. Trisha is such an accomplished woman in her thirties but cowers in front of her father, and even though we are taught in our Indian culture to be very respectful of parents, I particularly hate when parents take advantage of this and emotionally manipulate their children which is what happens here. Even though everything works out towards the end, I think Trisha should have grown a bit of a backbone and stood up for herself instead of everyone just behaving as if it was all ok now.

    This book is only a loose gender bent retelling of Pride and Prejudice which focuses mostly on the character’s pride and prejudices. It is a mostly realistic portrayal of different kinds of families and how class privilege can affect the perceptions of people towards others. Just don’t go into this expecting a lot of romance. It is an interesting read and I didn’t wanna put it down at all, but I also wanted something more from the characters.

  • Leigh Kramer

    I keep going back and forth on the rating. This might be 2.5 stars or it might be solidly 3. I can't decide.

    I’ve enjoyed Sonali Dev’s romance novels so I was curious what I would think of her women’s fiction, particularly one that is Pride And Prejudice-inspired. And I have to say, my feelings are complicated.

    As a P&P-inspired gender bent story, it’s inventive and a great update. Julia Wickham’s character in particular was a great/treacherous take. This is not a straight retelling and this f

    I keep going back and forth on the rating. This might be 2.5 stars or it might be solidly 3. I can't decide.

    I’ve enjoyed Sonali Dev’s romance novels so I was curious what I would think of her women’s fiction, particularly one that is Pride And Prejudice-inspired. And I have to say, my feelings are complicated.

    As a P&P-inspired gender bent story, it’s inventive and a great update. Julia Wickham’s character in particular was a great/treacherous take. This is not a straight retelling and this frees Dev up to make some interesting choices with the characters.

    The food descriptions are one of the best parts of this story. DJ’s passion for his work as a chef was just as fascinating as Trisha’s response to his creations. I also really liked learning about the technology Trisha developed in order to do cutting edge surgeries on tumors. I have no idea if it's based on existing technology but I hope so!

    However, the medical plot didn’t work for me and that means a good portion of this book didn’t work, as Trisha is a surgeon and DJ is her patient Emma’s brother. There are major HIPAA violations throughout where Trisha readily discloses Emma’s medical history, options, and prognosis to her family. She even laughs off HIPAA, basically saying her family is exempt, which just no. They’re not. Then there’s the matter of Trisha, a health care provider, dating her patient's brother. Now there is some gray area here as Trisha’s cousin connected DJ to her for the sake of giving Emma more medical options. Technically they first met at Yash’s fundraiser as DJ catered the event. Although Emma was already her patient, DJ was never at the hospital when Trisha did her rounds. So I can see where the lines are blurred but they never address the possible ramifications of how a relationship could impact Emma’s care and I’m still pretty sure it would violate Trisha’s employer’s policies, if not her medical license.

    Look. I don’t know how many times I need to say this regarding health care provider-patient/patient family member relationships but they’re wrong. If you are providing direct care to someone, then there’s a good reason to not become romantically or sexually involved with them or their family members. It’s an ethical violation for good reason and it boils down to relationship imbalance. If your health care provider ever tries this with you, please run in the opposite direction because they do not have you or your well-being in mind. I really need authors to stop with this pairing, unless it’s to paint it in a negative light or to show someone grappling with it. I will read those books but I cannot handle romanticizing an ethical violation.

    The other thing that super bothered me about the medical plot was the lack of social work involvement. (Of course it did. I used to be a medical social worker.) Emma’s situation is the perfect reason to involve the hospital social worker. I would have been all over helping her process her treatment options and what the loss of her vision would mean for her life and career. This was a gross mishandling of her care and it’s no wonder she didn’t respond well to Trisha or her brother. Additionally, the story was filled with ableism, some of which is countered but most is not. I was irritated Trisha and DJ wouldn’t respect Emma’s wishes to not get the surgery if it meant losing her eyesight—again pointing to why social work involvement would have helped. Patient-centered care is paramount and I didn’t see it here.

    The Yash-Julia storyline was quite troubling. Without spoiling why, I’ll say it was a poor understanding of #metoo. And frankly, it didn’t seem like the best way to adapt or update P&P.

    Lastly, Trisha’s family was quite toxic. I found myself willing Trisha to confront them or to at least stop avoiding the issue but she never did, which was quite puzzling as she’s very confident and assertive professionally. While we can be different people at work vs. home, the difference was jarring. By the time she did stand up to them, I was rooting for her to just cut them out of her life altogether. I wanted better for her. And along those lines, the antagonism between her and DJ lasted far too long for my comfort and I could not buy a happy ending for them.

    Like I said, this book was complicated. I’m still turning over the elements from Pride And Prejudice over in my mind but the rest of it was a struggle.

    CW:

    Disclosure: I received an advanced copy from William Morrow Paperbacks in exchange for an honest review.

  • Aarya Marsden

    I thought I had the mental bandwidth to discuss why this book didn't work for me, but I don't. I'm tired. But I want to justify my rating and what I thought was problematic, so major spoilers under the spoiler tag.

    CW: rape

    I thought I had the mental bandwidth to discuss why this book didn't work for me, but I don't. I'm tired. But I want to justify my rating and what I thought was problematic, so major spoilers under the spoiler tag.

    CW: rape

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