Aftershocks

Aftershocks

A solar system fights to survive and reform in the wake of war, but the real battle is about to begin.Across the six-planet expanse of the Gaia System, the Earthlike Gretia struggles to stabilize in the wake of an interplanetary war. Amid an uneasy alliance to maintain economies, resources, and populations, Aden Robertson reemerges. After devoting fifteen years of his life...

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Title:Aftershocks
Author:Marko Kloos
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Edition Language:English

Aftershocks Reviews

  • Liviu

    Quite an unexpected hit for me as I started but never progressed in the author's debut six-volume+ series Frontlines; an Amazon prime book of the month in July 2019, I got a sample in my email and the first page intrigued me, so I started reading and couldn't put the book down until the end, while volume 2 became a clear asap;

    Closer to space opera than pure military sf (though on a multiplanet solar system scale), the novel starts some 5 years after the end of a brutal 4+ year interplanetary wa

    Quite an unexpected hit for me as I started but never progressed in the author's debut six-volume+ series Frontlines; an Amazon prime book of the month in July 2019, I got a sample in my email and the first page intrigued me, so I started reading and couldn't put the book down until the end, while volume 2 became a clear asap;

    Closer to space opera than pure military sf (though on a multiplanet solar system scale), the novel starts some 5 years after the end of a brutal 4+ year interplanetary war in which Gretia, the main Earthlike but militaristic society (and with Nordic/German like names and racial description of the population to boot) of a 6 planet system (the others being much less hospitable to humanity but compensating in their own ways) tried to subjugate the other 5 and eventually lost to the alliance led by their main opponents Rhodia (having the main alliance fleet and Anglo-like names and ranks) and Pallas (with their shock ground troops and Southeast Asian names and racial description), though it surrendered while still occupying enemy territory and without being invaded; under the surrender terms, Gretia is under alliance rule, has to pay huge reparations, its fleet was confiscated, its military disbanded and its main elite forces - the Blackguards - condemned as war criminals so subject to a 5 year pow imprisonment rather than the usual 2 for the regular soldiers

    The main characters are Aden Robertson, a Gretian Blackguard intelligence major (with an Oceanian mother and a very good linguist) who is now just being set free from the Rhodian pow camps and has to decide what to do with the rest of his life after 17 years in the Gretian military, experienced Palladian sergeant Idina Chaudary of the allied occupation forces whose standard reconnaissance mission in the Gretian countryside goes bad in the first major incident since the peace, lt commander Dunstan Park, captain of Rhodian frigate Minotaur in charge of guarding the remains of the Gretian fleet (still under dispute between the alliance members 5 years on, as to whom gets what), a routine mission that turns out to be far from such, and finally but not least, Solveig Ragnar, 23, sole remaining child of major industrialist and former leading Gretian politician, Falk Ragnar - one of the 100+ council members who voted to start the fateful war and who is now banished from any interaction with his company or any political role in the "new" Gretia (as Solveig's much older brother Aden vanished 17 years ago after a brutal confrontation with their father and is presumed dead, while her Oceanian mother left her a year later and is now living a gambling socialite life in the casinos of Hades); Solveig by dint of being just under 18 when the peace treaty was signed is allowed to take the reigns of the failing family company from its interim managemnent now that she just graduated from college (any Gretian financial dynasty member whose company was involved with the war effort and was over 18 at the time of signing the peace treaty is not allowed to take any part in the company business or the political life of Gretia under said treaty, while Solveig was just 3 days under 18 then, so she and the Ragnar dynasty got lucky - or did they?) .

    The universe (politics, society, technology) is extremely intriguing and the characters quite appealing, while the book has action, intrigue and of course promises a lot more to come, parallels to WW1 and all (there is a passage towards the end where confronted by Solveig as to why he voted for war, Falk expounds for the first time the seemingly reasonable Gretian point of view of why Gretia chose war and specifically the way they started and prosecuted it by invading helpless Oceania rather than taking on their main rivals, Rhodia and Pallas, as opposed to the Gretians were the aggressive, militaristic, often monsters point of view that we get from everyone else until then - Idina, Dunstan, various people whom Aden meets etc)

    Highly, highly recommended and the unexpected sff hit of the year so far

  • Bradley

    Solid opening on two counts. The beginning of the novel was pretty strong with the whole "what are we going to do after being in a PoW" vibe going on, full of space opera MilSF goodness between two human populations.

    The other solid opening was for the expectation of a full series.

    Unfortunately, the actual novel does not feel all that much like a set piece. It might be fine and rather perfect as long as you're reading it along with a full set of novels to come, but since the wait time will be som

    Solid opening on two counts. The beginning of the novel was pretty strong with the whole "what are we going to do after being in a PoW" vibe going on, full of space opera MilSF goodness between two human populations.

    The other solid opening was for the expectation of a full series.

    Unfortunately, the actual novel does not feel all that much like a set piece. It might be fine and rather perfect as long as you're reading it along with a full set of novels to come, but since the wait time will be somewhat long, I have the distinct feeling like I'll have to re-read this one just to pick up on the other various character's viewpoints and the details leading up to the hanging plot threads. One or two is no big deal, but this opener promises a bit more complexity.

    Not bad, mind you, and great for MilSF space opera fans, but it does come with that caveat. :)

  • The Captain

    Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . .

    Okay mateys, I know I haven't even finished Marko Kloos' Frontlines series and yet here I be starting another series by him.  I have no regrets.  I picked this up and devoured it in one sitting.  It also helps that it be under 300 pages.

    In this book a nasty war has ended and it has been five years since the peace treaty.  But peace seems to be faltering.  This se

    Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . .

    Okay mateys, I know I haven't even finished Marko Kloos' Frontlines series and yet here I be starting another series by him.  I have no regrets.  I picked this up and devoured it in one sitting.  It also helps that it be under 300 pages.

    In this book a nasty war has ended and it has been five years since the peace treaty.  But peace seems to be faltering.  This series has multiple points of view.  Ye follow four perspectives:

    Aden - a POW from the losing side of the battle who is released five years after defeat to start anew;

    Idina - a soldier from the winning side who holds a grudge, she is part of the occupying military force on the defeated planet;

    Dunstan - a member of the winning naval space fleet whose simple guard duty turns into a mess with epic ramifications; and

    Solvieg - a civilian who was a minor during the war now has to deal with the consequences of her planet's loss and what it means for the family business.

    Like the first book in the Frontline series, this one was enjoyable entertainment of the popcorn fluff type.  Nothing wrong with that.  These characters are all likeable in their own ways and I was rooting for them all even when they were at cross-purposes.  Aden was me favourite.  The world-building was sufficient and the plot was fun but the characters were the driving force for me.  The peace is about to destruct and I want to know what happens next!

    Be advised that this has a major cliffhanger ending that had me surprised at the abruptness and wanting more.  For those crew members who dislike these, mehaps wait until more books are released.  I will be reading them as they come.  Arrr!

    So lastly . . .

    Thank you 47 North!

    Check out me other reviews at

  • Ben Babcock

    As much as I think the finale of

    might be one of the best TV finales ever, I do wish we had seen (canonically, on screen) what the aftermath of the Dominion War brought. It’s one thing to tell a war story—and DS9 told it well—and another to talk about after the war. About picking up the pieces, rebuilding, and healing wounds of all varieties.

    is exactly that kind of book. Marko Kloos drops us into a solar system five years after the last official shot was f

    As much as I think the finale of

    might be one of the best TV finales ever, I do wish we had seen (canonically, on screen) what the aftermath of the Dominion War brought. It’s one thing to tell a war story—and DS9 told it well—and another to talk about after the war. About picking up the pieces, rebuilding, and healing wounds of all varieties.

    is exactly that kind of book. Marko Kloos drops us into a solar system five years after the last official shot was fired and, through a select cast of characters, asks us to consider how we would rebuild trust, empathy, and our own personal lives. Thanks to 47North and NetGalley for the eARC!

    Perhaps the main character, because we meet him first and get the most pagetime with him, is Aden. At the beginning of the book he is a prisoner of war, because he was on the losing side. He is soon released, time served, and finds himself adrift in that way released prisoners often are. Aden is in no rush to return to his home planet of Gretia, to be found by his estranged father of means, yet he doesn’t know where else he might belong. Kloos introduces other perspectives: Dunstan is the commander of a Rhodian battleship that witnesses some very unusual activity; Idina is a Palladian infantry sergeant who loses her entire squadron in a devastating ambush and then gets put on peace patrol duty; Solveig is the heiress to a Gretian family business suffering under sanctions and war reparations.

    Each of these characters is trying to move on in some way, to some degree, although you will grow attached to them by varying amounts. For example, as much as I liked Dunstan, we don’t learn as much about his backstory as we do some of the others, so I’m not entirely sure what his deal is. Idina might be my favourite. She goes through

    in a short amount of time in this book, yet she remains true to herself and still develops as far as her character goes.

    Kloos makes it clear that there is something untoward happening in this system, hints at a conspiracy or Xanatos gambit behind the scenes. From strange piracy behaviour to mystery attacks and the destruction of mothballed fleets, it’s as if someone is trying to stir up trouble—but to what end? If you’re looking for answers, without spoilers I’m going to tell you that you won’t really find them.

    doesn’t exactly end on a cliffhanger, but it’s definitely not a standalone book. Indeed, my major grip with this novel is just how little Kloos ties together the characters’ stories. There is definitely some overlap; don’t get me wrong. Clearly the connections are there. I just was expecting the storylines to converge towards the end, and when that didn’t really happen, it left me disappointed.

    I’m willing to cut Kloos a lot of slack, however, simply because I enjoyed the sandbox we got to play in. Lots of tantalizing hints about the origins of this system without anything along the lines of a huge infodump. The technology is handwavey at times, yet also fairly familiar—commtabs and artificial gravity, etc. Oh, and do you like naval-inspired space battles? Because have some good naval-inspired space battles happening here, particularly in Dunstan's chapters. Great combination of AI and human responsibilities, really intense and suspenseful scenes of stalking a target, deciding when to go hot, etc. This isn’t the main focus of the book by any means; I wouldn’t call

    military SF per se—but it’s just enough to satisfy me without being more than I really want in a book.

    So on balance, I liked

    . It’s

    without being particularly great, and you know, that’s really all I want in the end. I’ll

    great when I can get it, and I’ll wax poetic and reread it and talk about how it changed my life. But this is a nice science fiction adventure full of intrigue and both interpersonal and intrapersonal drama, and I am totally here for it. Give me more!

  • Sherwood Smith

    Simply inhaled this.

    Be warned: it's the first in a series, and ends on the sort of cliffhanger that causes readers to breathe brimstone and pitchforks. If you can't stand that sort of ending, then buy the book and stash it underneath that copy of Proust you've always meant to read, until the next comes out.

    It starts deceptively slowly, as Aden, who has been a prisoner of war for five years, is released and told to get out of Rhodia. Everyone hates the Gretians who lost the war, but they really,

    Simply inhaled this.

    Be warned: it's the first in a series, and ends on the sort of cliffhanger that causes readers to breathe brimstone and pitchforks. If you can't stand that sort of ending, then buy the book and stash it underneath that copy of Proust you've always meant to read, until the next comes out.

    It starts deceptively slowly, as Aden, who has been a prisoner of war for five years, is released and told to get out of Rhodia. Everyone hates the Gretians who lost the war, but they really, really hate the military unit he was in.

    We also are introduced to some other POVs. Some of these connect up toward the end, others don't, but as attacks begin to happen, without anyone knowing why or who, it's clear that all these POVs will be converging as action stars shifting into high gear.

    Kloos is so good at military SF and worldbuilding. Terrific characters, fascinating setup, unpredictable turns in the plot. But how long O lord, how long, until book two????

    I'll be buying this in print.

    Copy provided by NetGalley

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