Troll Hunting: Inside the World of Online Hate and its Human Fallout

Troll Hunting: Inside the World of Online Hate and its Human Fallout

In 2013, journalist Ginger Gorman was trolled online. She received scores of hateful tweets, including a death threat. A picture of Ginger heavily pregnant alongside her husband and two-and-half year old daughter appeared on a fascist website. Understandably she was terrified, but once the attack subsided, she found herself curious. Who were these trolls? How and why did t...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Troll Hunting: Inside the World of Online Hate and its Human Fallout
Author:Ginger Gorman
Rating:

Troll Hunting: Inside the World of Online Hate and its Human Fallout Reviews

  • Katty O'Neill

    I was preparing myself to take a long time with Troll Hunting. Not for lack of interesting content, mind you, but for my general peace of mind. Delving deep into the world of online hate, I thought I would have to dip in and out - immersing myself into Ginger’s story and then coming up for air just for a bit of self preservation. But so far, this hasn’t been the case at all for me. I’ve been engrossed.

    ‘What are you reading?’ an 80-year-old woman asked me on the train to Ararat yesterday night,

    I was preparing myself to take a long time with Troll Hunting. Not for lack of interesting content, mind you, but for my general peace of mind. Delving deep into the world of online hate, I thought I would have to dip in and out - immersing myself into Ginger’s story and then coming up for air just for a bit of self preservation. But so far, this hasn’t been the case at all for me. I’ve been engrossed.

    ‘What are you reading?’ an 80-year-old woman asked me on the train to Ararat yesterday night, ‘you’ve had your head stuck in that book the whole way!’ And it’s true. There is something about Ginger’s writing as she leads herself (and in turn, finds herself being led) deeper into the world of trolling that holds you. As you read, you’ll feel despair and anger and frustration, but there’s also another feeling that will sneak up on you. Awe. Awe for what Ginger has done - putting herself on the line to lift a particularly heavy, slippery and dangerous curtain for everyone to see behind. In an age where the media (especially women in media) are being hounded from all sides, a book like this comes along and just blows your mind. Investigative journalism. Bam.

    Troll Hunting will make you look at cyberhate directly in the eye. But Ginger’s effective writing, humour and bravery, will help you see it for what it is and what it means.

    If you’re reading this post it means you’re online. If you’re online, you need to read this book when it comes out early next year.

  • Carly Findlay

    I received an advanced copy of Troll Hunting from Hardie Grant. I have also pre-ordered a copy from Booktopia, paying for it myself. And I am featured in Troll Hunting – Ginger is a dear friend and she interviewed me about my experience of being trolled. It was enthralling and un-putdownable, but I needed to take breaks for my own mental health. I can’t imagine the impact on Ginger when researching and writing it.

    Troll Hunting is about cyberhate – relentless and malicious online trolling. It fe

    I received an advanced copy of Troll Hunting from Hardie Grant. I have also pre-ordered a copy from Booktopia, paying for it myself. And I am featured in Troll Hunting – Ginger is a dear friend and she interviewed me about my experience of being trolled. It was enthralling and un-putdownable, but I needed to take breaks for my own mental health. I can’t imagine the impact on Ginger when researching and writing it.

    Troll Hunting is about cyberhate – relentless and malicious online trolling. It features stories of being the victim of trolling from many people, and perspectives from trolls themselves. These are particularly creepy to read. The justification of cyberhate is vile.

    Ginger took such great care in telling my story of being trolled on Reddit - five years ago now - and I know she’s been gentle in telling everyone else’s stories in the book.

    Ginger is angry too - rightly so. Trolling is an epidemic that costs victims their jobs, families and lives – yet police and government authorities and social media don’t take tracking down and punishing trolls serious enough.

    This mustn’t have been an easy book to write - Ginger’s strength and researching ability is commendable. It’s so well written and researched, and easily readable for all the referencing and dark subject matter.

    Troll Hunting isn’t fiction. It real life. The internet is real life, therefore trolling is real life. Troll Hunting will make your stomach churn, but also make you marvel at Ginger’s (and other victims of trolling’s) resilience, and the unlikely friendship between her and a troll.

    I really hope it shakes up the way cyberhate is dealt with by authorities - because cyberhate destroys lives.

  • Paul Bryant

    As I was reading this book it did dawn on me that

    right here on Goodreads. The great majority of trolling is done for the lols, you know. Joking around, yanking people’s chains, getting a rise out of the unwary, lotsa lolz. So when I adopt the persona of an irritable 12 year old to review

    and complain that the author totally ripped off

    , or I want my money back because there were no songs in

    by Charles Dickens, or I critici

    As I was reading this book it did dawn on me that

    right here on Goodreads. The great majority of trolling is done for the lols, you know. Joking around, yanking people’s chains, getting a rise out of the unwary, lotsa lolz. So when I adopt the persona of an irritable 12 year old to review

    and complain that the author totally ripped off

    , or I want my money back because there were no songs in

    by Charles Dickens, or I criticize Steinbeck for not writing enough about mice in

    to warrant the joint billing, that’s really trolling, and many people have eagerly berated me for not realizing that

    was written a long time before

    , and that

    is a quote from a poem. Oh, I did not know that, I say, and anyway, who cares, lol.

    The ugly end of internet trolling is very straightforward – anyone sending death and rape threats to women should be given a prison sentence, that’s as much of a no brainer as the scummy trolls are themselves no brainers. But there is a much greyer, more convolutedly complex form of trolling, and a lot of this book is clogged with Ginger Gorman’s flailing attempts to find a foothold in this soggy, sinking moral morass.

    Let’s take #sandylootcrew. This was a “successful” co-ordinated campaign of what’s classed as

    , a type of trolling designed to expose the built-in prejudices of our beloved mainstream media, and by extension, our own prejudices.

    During Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, one of the trolls interviewed by Ginger, Meepsheep, explains that trolls pretended to be a horde of black looters by making “all these accounts on Twitter pretending to be a bunch of black dudes in New Jersey and…posting that we’re going around looting and robbing and whatever during the hurricane. We used the tag #sandylootcrew and just through that, it attracted a lot of media attention. We were saying totally ridiculous things”.

    cats!

    Meepsheep said :

    GG is not convinced. She says

    This is not a new question. Way, way back in 1965 a British comedy writer created the character Alf Garnett in the tv sitcom

    (this became

    with Archie Bunker, in the USA). He was a white working class Conservative bigot who was very frequently explicitly racist, and this was done by the leftie Speight in order to satirize his attitudes. But not surprisingly, a part of the show’s huge audience turned out to be

    all of Alf’s tirades against blacks and wogs and Pakis. Oh dear!

    The satire defense is always very dubious. For instance, you get all manner of gross misogyny being served up and presented as satire and black humour, supposed itself to be excoriating misogynistic attitudes, not confirming them. (See Brett Easton Ellis’ nervous explanations of

    , and Nick Palumbo’s outrageous claims about his movie

    .)

    People used to chuck the contents of chamber pots out onto the street, they used to spit on the street and on buses (I just about remember signs on buses NO SPITTING), they used to smoke cigarettes all the time, everywhere, they also used to let their dogs poo all over the place, on pavements, in parks, anywhere. None of this happens anymore.

    Here we have the stories of two jailed British trolls, one female, who both sent rape and death threats to Caroline Criado-Perez, who was campaigning for a woman to be featured on the £10 note, and Labour MP Stella Creasy, who supported the campaign. The article interviews both of them about motive and life after jail. I thought this statement by John Nimmo was remarkable :

    "Not feeding the trolls doesn’t magically scrub out the image in your head of being told you’ll be gang-raped till you die."

    She wrote an article about the whole thing which includes a handy list of the rape & death threats she got, should you be interested

    It’s a large question, but undoubtedly most of the hate comes from young or youngish white men who have come to feel that they live in a suffocating liberal-left culture & that white men have been made the scapegoat for the whole world’s problems and who now perceive themselves to be the real victims & react by spewing forth unlimited hatred upon the easiest, most obvious targets, women and minorities and leftists. The cliché of the kid in the basement who’s never had a girlfriend is not that far off, according to Ginger. (Cf the modern incel self-identification.) Except that the guys she interviews (at length) aren’t like that.

    I already read a similar book

    (great title) by Whitney Phillips. She is the sociologist, and Ginger Gorman is the emotionally committed journalist. Both books are essential reading about this whole cyberhate thing. Neither has any silver bullet solution, cause there ain’t one.

  • Brooke - One Woman's Brief Book Reviews

    *

    *

    Troll Hunting : inside the world of online hate and its human fallout by Ginger Gorman. (2019).

    In 2013, journalist Ginger was trolled online. She was terrified but then curious about who the trolls were, how and why do they attack, and how can one fight back? Ginger spent the next five years researching by speaking to psychologists, trolling victims, law enforcement, academics, and the trolls themselves. This book is that journey and t

    *

    *

    Troll Hunting : inside the world of online hate and its human fallout by Ginger Gorman. (2019).

    In 2013, journalist Ginger was trolled online. She was terrified but then curious about who the trolls were, how and why do they attack, and how can one fight back? Ginger spent the next five years researching by speaking to psychologists, trolling victims, law enforcement, academics, and the trolls themselves. This book is that journey and the discoveries Ginger made along the way about the trolls, their targets and the costs of cyberhate.

    I rarely read non-fiction but this book was highly recommended to me by a friend and sounded quite interesting. Happy to report that it didn't disappoint. 'Cyberhate' is something the majority of internet users are aware of, and a high number have experienced it in some shape and form so this book is very relevant and timely as the issue gets more exposure. The book was compelling and very informative. A few times it felt a bit dry for me, however I also think the information was clearly very well researched and referenced by the author. I enjoyed and found fascinating the author's interactions with 'trolls' and respected her compassion and willingness to try to understand the motivations behind that kind of behaviour. It was disappointing to read about the lack of support for victims of cyberhate; one can only hope that this novel assists in more exposure of the trauma experienced by people and the realisation that it isn't a feasible option for people to just 'turn it off and don't look at it'. Definitely an on topic novel that doesn't necessarily find answers but rightly points out that all of us in modern society are involved in this issue; would recommend this book for those interested in the topic and any regular users of the internet.

  • Jaclyn Crupi

    This book offers rare insight into the terrifying and troubling world of trolls and online hate. It’s a taxing read and Gorman repeatedly returns to how difficult it was to write. Her research is impressive and my main takeaway is most of the things you assume about trolls and trolling is wrong.

Best Books Online is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2019 Best Books Online - All rights reserved.